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No foolin'! Dingos are running through April! - Page 12

post #221 of 247
Jo, sign up already!!! Renaissance kids, farm-loving kids, STEM interest... Who knows? They'll find their own way... And may (probably) do something that's not even have on the table. (I started writing that about my kids. Then changed it to your kids. Then I realized it applies to both. smile.gif )

Tjsmom, can. not. believe. you're still skiing! Tomorrow's May 1st, for crying out loud! Enjoy! Great report!

Got in my run. Woot.
post #222 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by loftmama View Post

Tjsmom, can. not. believe. you're still skiing! Tomorrow's May 1st, for crying out loud!
Well see, it's still snowing here. Word is there's 5-7" on the way for the Denver 'burbs tomorrow, though hopefully not sticking too too much down here.

Did I mention that I am D - O - N - E with the snow? This will be snowstorm #8 since March 1. At least it's not supposed to be as cold as the others have been, which is doubly good because I planted all of the cold crops on Sunday (the latest I've planted a garden in about a decade) and put in some strawberries too. My rhubarb is just recovering from the last hard freeze that I feared had taken it out of the running for this year.
post #223 of 247

We only need 3 more inches of measurable snow and we break the all-time snowiest winter for Duluth. Since like 1880.  And did I mention that the first two weeks of January we had borrowed a friends' bike trainer because we had so little snow?

 

Speaking of biking: dh and I went biking yesterday. I'm so wiped today. It was super fun, and I refused to let myself get frustrated when I tried to draft, was pedaling as fast as I could and he still repeatedly slipped away. I think he needs to come down to my level.I think he will. But in the meantime it is a feat to declare that I will.not.be frustrated/feel bad when I can't keep up.

post #224 of 247
I am fly-by posting as I am chronically harried lately.

I am so ready to hit a summer schedule. Final exams start next week for ds1 as he has 5 AP exams and 1 English paper last I checked. He might have to take his regular chem final too, I forget. Ds2 is probably good to go but I want to finish our unit on plants. The girls, as usual, wear me out. We will do math and history through the summer but at a reduced rate. The weather is gearing up for some good beach days!

thispath, San Diego area seems to have races almost every weekend. The weather averages to be always nice though not as hot as many expect. It is great running weather year round but I usually take a sweatshirt or sweater to the beach with me except in September and my girls will play in the water year round as "once you are numb it doesn't matter how cold the water is."

RR: nope. but I think about it. I also think about the dingos that need a grouphug.gif.
post #225 of 247
Okay, homeschoolers and those who supplement math at home ~ DD1 is struggling with her basic math facts. She understands the concepts (borrowing, carrying, etc.) but basic addition and multiplication facts are not there. I plan to work with her this summer to ensure that all addition and multiplication 1-10 facts are "cold" so when she starts 4th grade, she can take off. She's relied on finger counting for WAY too long and it's starting to show in her speed (obviously) and propensity for basic computation errors. So, how do I do this? Drill? Flashcards? What is the best way to get those facts into her head and make them stay?!

RR - kettlebells tonight

NRR - looks like public school again for us next year greensad.gif. Trying to dredge $10,000 from our budget for tuition was an exercise in futility. Can't get blood from a stone. I plan on getting a job that pays, as opposed to my 40+ hour a week volunteer gigs, and saving for a year. In the meantime, DH is job hunting again. Get us out of Illinois, stat.

Time to put groceries away.
post #226 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayGee View Post

Okay, homeschoolers and those who supplement math at home ~ DD1 is struggling with her basic math facts. She understands the concepts (borrowing, carrying, etc.) but basic addition and multiplication facts are not there. I plan to work with her this summer to ensure that all addition and multiplication 1-10 facts are "cold" so when she starts 4th grade, she can take off. She's relied on finger counting for WAY too long and it's starting to show in her speed (obviously) and propensity for basic computation errors. So, how do I do this? Drill? Flashcards? What is the best way to get those facts into her head and make them stay?!
 

My second, then third grader had Mad Math Minute worksheets.

 

http://www.webmathminute.com/default.asp

 

The point is to do as many problems as quickly as you can -- you get 1 minute.

At first she didn't finish the sheet.

But it was daily. And it helped. A lot.

 

 

However, like anything else, I'd guess it depends on your kid. 

post #227 of 247
JayGee--not homeschooling but R has been drilling math facts at a site called Xtramath.com every night. It does about a 10-minute drill and tracks her progress on some helpful graphs. She's also supposed to be doing something at another website called multiplication.com though I don't think she has. We had another throw-down last night about math facts. She's so close to being done with the addition on XtraMath, but she won't complete it one day, is not paying attention the next day, etc, and keeps backtracking. We've had the conversation several times but I made it very clear that she WILL learn her math facts for addition, subtraction and multiplication by the end of summer, even if it means she doesn't get to do anything fun because all we do is drill. There's also a fun math facts game that she has on her Kindle, but she's not made the choice to use it.

We have flashcards too and during the long tantrum/throw-down last night she claimed they would be easier. I opened them up and started drilling her and she was forced to admit that gee, she doesn't know all of them and it wasn't any better and chose to go back to Xtramath. I think I'll start drilling her in the car too. That should be fun. eyesroll.gif

It's a battle we've been having all year. She has no interest in memorizing them, has thrown several fits, and for a few months DH kept insisting that she did know them (when originally tested, math was her biggest strength. She's good at figuring stuff out (when she wants to be) but memorizing math facts is something she's too busy investing energy in resisting than in just learning). I had to prove to him that she didn't before he got involved (that was probably November) and even with both of us having explained why she needs to know this, we've had several throw-downs. Honestly, I'm not sure what I'm going to do with her. Lately, any time she's asked to do her work the drama starts. Fix a violin error? Drama. Do your work before play? Drama. Fix the spelling errors on your book journal? Drama. Told you're going to take two weeks of swimming lessons this summer because um, you cannot swim at all? Drama. banghead.gif I cannot for the life of me understand why she invests so much time and energy into resisting rather than just getting it done and getting on with her life. (Yes, we've had that conversation multiple times too. But every. single. time. she chooses the hard way that leaves her less time for fun.)
post #228 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayGee View Post

Okay, homeschoolers and those who supplement math at home ~ DD1 is struggling with her basic math facts. She understands the concepts (borrowing, carrying, etc.) but basic addition and multiplication facts are not there. I plan to work with her this summer to ensure that all addition and multiplication 1-10 facts are "cold" so when she starts 4th grade, she can take off. She's relied on finger counting for WAY too long and it's starting to show in her speed (obviously) and propensity for basic computation errors. So, how do I do this? Drill? Flashcards? What is the best way to get those facts into her head and make them stay?!

If she finger counts, I take it to mean she's solid with the concept of addition, right?

 

How is she with the concept of multiplication?  Does she know when to use it and understand how it represents objects?

 

Assuming she's solid on both, here's what worked for DD the summer before 4th.  For her, it was a need to get to the point where she could do the written, timed tests at school, so everything was written.  If the writing part of it isn't the barrier, then I'd do whatever seems to be least stressful for her. 

 

We made two goals, (1) to work at it and to show effort towards achieving faster math facts, and (2) to get to a speed goal (100 multiplication up to 12x12 in 5 minutes)

 

To achieve (1), we agreed that she'd attempt a page of multiplication facts for 5 minutes every single day for the month of August.  If she met (1) even if she didn't meet (2), she'd get a reward (I don't remember what it was, but it was sizable)

To achieve (2) we would keep track of how she did daily, and plot it on a graph by her desk.  We drew a horizontal red line across the graph at 100 showing the goal.  If she achieved (2), then she'd get a different reward (I don't remember what it was, but it was a lot smaller than the (1) reward).

 

The graph was key for us as it showed her very clearly her improvement toward the goal.  We noted a few patterns in her learning (a huge dip one day almost always predicted a big leap the next), which helped us frame a lot of subsequent discussions about her learning when she'd get frustrated.  This approach really worked out well for us because it showed her that the effort was what was most key, and small amounts of effort daily was quite effective.  We'd also set the bar really low for the second goal, which means she'd met it in a matter of days.  She quickly then set herself a second goal (150) which she also blew past.  The 168 problems in 5 minutes page is still on our fridge almost 2 years later.

post #229 of 247

Our district is seeing a lot of stress in kids on xtramath.  Mine haven't been subjected to it, so I'm not sure.

 

I have come to prefer "how many can you do in X time" approaches in stead of  "do all of these in X time" approaches like Mad Minute.  The child will necessarily fail each time until she/he finally gets fast enough.  We liked the almost daily success with our way of "beat last week's record."

post #230 of 247
Xtramath should be free, so you can try it and see what you think. R does like the graph that shows what she's mastering (see below). She'll usually tell me after the progress quiz how many more have turned green. I like the one that tracks her mastery. This only shows the last two months, but she's been doing it since November (100+ days). Her original score was 6. She had an 81 but now she's doing I don't know what again, and has dropped back down to 70. banghead.gif Oh, I also like the fact that it's literally 10 minutes and I don't have to time it or have her nearby to supervise.



Paul watched her last night (her Kindle privileges were removed for screaming and carrying on about learning math facts; she can only use it to do Xtramath under our direct supervision). He discovered that she came up with some sort of rule about large numbers that she apparently believed will have double-digit answers and so she'll type a 1 before figuring out the second number. Unfortunately, it's a severely flawed rule and leads to results like the ones you see below (all the ones where the only answer is 1), never mind the fact that the point of math facts is to know them. We know she can problem solve but that's not what we need her to do here. (Paul also pointed out that it's a problem when one doesn't recognize that their rule is flawed and adjust it accordingly....)



Each session has one progress quiz and two fact practices. The smilies are for questions answered correctly and within three seconds or something like that. The green checkmarks are for questions answered correctly in a slightly longer time frame. The blue hourglass is for questions answered correctly but often prompted by the program (it will show one or both numbers in a grey font after a while and the kids can type it in for some credit) and obviously there are the ones that are wrong. (I'm not necessarily a fan of that, but I do like the fact that at least she can move on to another problem without getting "stuck.")

Also, I wouldn't suggest Xtramath unless they can do it on something with a touchpad. When R does Xtramath on a laptop using the numbers above the letters, her score drops quite a lot. That requires more than computation because then she has to distinguish the letters from the numbers and function keys and symbols above the numbers on the same key, etc. She might do ok on a number pad if we had a keyboard that had one, but then there's the problem that it looks like a phone number pad except the numbers are exactly opposite. As long as she does it on her Kindle she doesn't have to think about the technical process of typing it in.

I've printed out some of the worksheets that kerc suggested. We'll try those too. I'm really ready to throw anything and everything at it at this point.

Wise Dingos:

For those that do incentives, what and how? Our school is great with the positive rewards kind of thing, but I'm not so much. She's not currently motivated (enough) by the fact that as soon as she gets all of the squares to be green she'll get a certificate from the teacher, in front of the class no less. She's not motivated enough by the fact that once she knows them she won't have to practice them anymore. She's not motivated by the opportunity to buy a book (for her Kindle or otherwise). She only seems motivated by the option to buy another game for her Kindle, but that leads to more drama when it comes to doing work. We go to the zoo and museum regularly so that's apparently not an incentive either. She doesn't buy much of anything and isn't a kid who's always asking for stuff either (for example, the kids were each given $15 gift cards for Disneyland and both bought one stuffed animal. R had more money to buy other stuff but didn't). But maybe I'm thinking about this all wrong?
post #231 of 247
Thanks so much Real, geo and kerc! You guys are awesome.

Real - for DD, her biggest incentive is time alone with me. No sister, no brother, no one but the two of us (preferably browsing at Justice and then the bookstore). We don't have to buy anything at all, but time spent with me that she doesn't have to share with siblings is a huge incentive for her to do most stuff she doesn't want to do.
post #232 of 247
I am chiming in too late that I use 1 and 5 minute timed sheets (that came with Saxon grades 1-3. I mark how far they get in the allotted time and then they finish the sheet. There are 1-2 sheets a day, each sheet is either addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. For four of my kiddos that was plenty if not too much. Dd1 needed some extra drilling because she 'didn't want to memorize' them. eyesroll.gif There are many things she doesn't want to do.

No running today but I did do school, go to piano lessons, Costco, Asian market for tamarind and other random goodies, and soon we are off to swim practice followed by a math banquet at UCSD where ds1 is presenting his solution to a problem from his most recent contest. It should be nothing but giggles. winky.gif (I am proud of him but I am not going to understand what he or anyone else is saying.)
post #233 of 247

Would like to add in that my dd gets all the concepts, and is hung up on a few mult facts. I have game or two loaded on the iPad, and I also photocopied a 0x0 through 12x12 table, and dd fills that in. Because she gets concepts and is into learning how to do things in math, the incentive for her (right now) is that it's a lot easier to do 2-digit multiplication when you have the facts memorized--less likely to forget what you carried, etc. We will continue at least the games, if not add in worksheets, over summer.

 

My ds seemed to take forever to learn them. Totally my fault and due to where I was in my life when he was in grades 1-3. But he has picked it all up and amazes me daily with how he learns in his Geometry & Algebra course. shrug.gif

 

RR: ran longer yesterday morning. It was pretty good. I am running for longer stretches, and I can definitely go farther, faster than when this all started. I have a long way to go, but some fitness stayed around. I'm on my way. And I'm registered, which saved me like $15.

 

But followed by a long and stressful school day, since I told ds he was not going on today's field trip unless he finished his science project (which meant only finishing up final touches on the report, pasting up the presentation board, and videotaping himself presenting). This was complicated by Wednesday being our marathon Arabic lesson day (kids each do an hour; I do 2). Anyway, it all got done and lucky me, today I get to go to Dubai. On the bright side, my plan is to sign my kids into the things and then slink off to read a book on my Kindle and drink a lot of coffee. Not a perfect day, but it is what I will take. And tomorrow is weekend, when we will make up the Thursday off. Poor kids.

post #234 of 247
Thread Starter 
DS also uses the timed one minute sheets.

It has been a day here. Long snowy drive up to the mountains, mediocre snow conditions before lunch, better after but I was too tired from the mediocre conditions to enjoy them. Then, the pass was closed due to the snow, so we had to go the long way back to the highway. On the way down (NOT going fast, for the record, all of about 20mph), I went around a curve and slowly slid into the ditch. irked.gif It was scary, but we were very fortunate that we went off the side toward the mountain and not the side with the drop-off. A bunch of good samaritans stopped and tried to dig/push me out, but no luck. I was on the phone with AAA (which would have taken forever, due to the high number of accidents) when another good samaritan pulled up with a big truck and a tow rope. He saved our bacon and pulled us out. We crept down into the next town, only to find that the highway was closed (9 car accident) with no estimated re-opening time. We hung out at Starbucks for a while, then went to an outlet to shop a little. While we were there, my mom called to tell me that my grandma passed away. bawling.gif She had been in hospice care for about a month, so it wasn't unexpected, but that doesn't make it any easier, ya know? Two hours later, the highway reopened and we slowly made our way home. Sigh. The good parts of today: the skiing was good in the afternoon, I got to hang out with a good friend, I bought a cute shirt at the outlet, and we made it home safely with no damage to ourselves or the car.
post #235 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommajb View Post

Dd1 needed some extra drilling because she 'didn't want to memorize' them. eyesroll.gif There are many things she doesn't want to do.
This is exactly our problem. Congrats to your son!

1jooj--actually, it doesn't surprise me that he rocks at geometry and algebra. They're different skill sets, and one is mostly about memorizing. R's a good writer, but her spelling (which boils down to memorization of either individual words or spelling rules) is not.

tjsmama--I'm so sorry to hear about your grandmother, and that you were stuck in that mess coming home.

RR: 3 at the gym. It was so nice to not do speedwork today thanks to tapering. I'm thinking I am a wimp at heart.
post #236 of 247

uh. yes real. you've been describing some of our issues with erin. freaking first-born children (I'm married to one, but not one myself).
 

post #237 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by kerc View Post

uh. yes real. you've been describing some of our issues with erin. freaking first-born children (I'm married to one, but not one myself).
 

Yup, we've got one too.  Good writer, bad speller etc.  We've used xtramath but what has really helped has been when dh sits down and does drills with dd.  However, dd just showed me a game my dad had on his ipad that seemed like a fun drill, math vs. zombies.

 

Gaye - I'm sorry about your Grandma.

 

We  had a bawling.gif day here too.  I realized on Tuesday that my all-time favorite cat, who has been ailing, had stopped purring.  We'd both taken a nice long nap together after my boxing class and when I got up he stayed in bed but no purring and I just knew that it was time.  So yesterday dh and I took him in.  The girls have been very sad but trying to be brave.  We'll have a funeral tomorrow because dd1 wants to do something significant.

 

I'm sorry to be so absent recently, I'm just trying to find the new groove now that I can go back to a normal schedule.

 

Love to all my Dingoes!

post #238 of 247

Gaye, I am really sorry to hear about your grandma. And glad you are safe.

 

And Plady, also your kitty.

 

Shanti, thinking of you, mama.

 

On the math facts...I guess what surprised me was that I figured since ds was so slow to memorize the math facts (especially multiplication), I was really afraid they would hinder his acquisition of new abilities in math--like, get in the way of his attaining new concepts as he stumbled over basic facts. Luckily, this did not turn out to be the case. Maybe it took him longer to do the work until he got the memorization, though. Anyway, big sigh of relief as the rote part caught up with the concepts. Hoping for dd to get to the same place this summer.

 

This is the ridiculous child-marketing scheme my daughter participated in today. Yes, I am a little ashamed. I could not bring myself to go in (crowds of not just children, but a very special brand of mostly Emirati schoolchildren, 900 or so of them...I knew I would probably end up deported).

 

RR: Out for a run tomorrow morning.

post #239 of 247
Plady - greensad.gif sorry about your sweet kitty

tjsmama - scary day. I'm so sorry about your grandmother. Even expected losses are difficult.

I just got back from the WORST dentist experience with my DD2. She had a filling that had cracked and needed to be replaced. She started freaking out the minute they put the gas on her nose and cried the entire time. She spoke disrespectfully to the dentist and BIT him!!! Three times!!!! She just kept saying, "I don't like you touching my face", and "I don't want your fingers in my mouth". Then, when he had to drill out the old filling, she screamed bloody murder, but because she'd been crying the whole time, we couldn't tell if she wasn't numb, or if she was just crying from the pressure. It was truly awful. She literally cried for an hour afterwards and every time I tried to talk to her about it, she just cried more. I am just so mortified that my almost-7-year-old BIT the dentist. Oy.
post #240 of 247
JayGee--maybe a bad reaction to the gas? Or not enough? It sounds like she was being assertive in the way we teach kids about stranger danger and maybe the gas took off the edge enough that she lost any inhibition about the fact that it was the dentist and ok, but not enough edge off to make her feel calm? They had to adjust the gas with when R had the sealant put on. I don't remember whether they had to turn it up or down but she did better once it was adjusted. At any rate, I'd guess the gas was a major factor in what happened.

An oral sedative might also help. That's how we did R's cap when she was 4. Our dentist generally won't do work if the kids are freaking out because they don't want to traumatize them or the other kids in the office. Even better, most of the oral sedatives have the side effect of giving them amnesia about the experience. Pure awesomeness. R needed three fillings when she was 2 and unfortunately, completely freaked out when we tried to do it in-office with the gas mask (I think she still remembered the whole NICU experience when she was born...she had a white-coat aversion for a loooong time). We ended up doing the complete sedation route at the hospital. Even there they try to give an oral sedative before the kids go into the OR, but the one they gave her had no effect whatsoever and she remembered all of it, down to the blanket they put over her to keep her warm. So that ended up being traumatizing for everyone 'cause we all remembered them holding the mask down as she cried before she dropped off to sleep. guilty.gif She played "dentist" for months after that, re-enacting the scenario again and again and again, usually with her as the dentist and us as the patients, and she freaked out every time we went to the dentist just for a checkup. One of her fillings fell out when she was 4, so they decided to do a cap. They used a different oral sedative, it worked (!), she completely relaxed, did just fine, and didn't remember any of it. She's been calm for visits since then, although getting the sealants put on this spring took a bit of coaching. If she needs another filling, I'd go the oral sedative route again because it's so much easier on everyone. Sorry for the book!
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