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the bf thread

post #1 of 238
Thread Starter 
Can we use this space to talk about breastfeeding? I can't remember if there already was a thread in this ddc or not. Let's share tips and tricks.



So since I'm attempting to switch to nursing entirely without the shield I am encountering problems getting her to latch when I'm rather engorged. My nipples will leak milk all over her but she will fuss, half assedly latch and then pull off to fuss more. Right now is say we are going about 50% with shield still. What tricks should I try when she is fussing like that??
post #2 of 238
Our LO is just 24 hours old so not too much to talk about. I too would like some help with latching! I hope now that we are in the recovery room we can focus on all of the things we have to learn about parenthood.
post #3 of 238
Tiff4ny, try reverse pressure softening: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/rev_pressure_soft_cotterman/

I discovered this or was shown this with my first many moons ago. It works really well, even when each boob is bigger than your own adult head like mine were!

HTH,
MM
post #4 of 238
Oh, also, she may be latching well but getting too fast a flow! In that case, I would pull my kids off after letdown, they hated that, and let that first wild spray go directly into some towels. Then I would latch the kiddo back on and nurse as usual.

Typically, at this early stage, I was shooting across the room from the other side so that's how I figured perhaps there was a bit of drinking from the firehouse action going on!
post #5 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munchkin08 View Post

Our LO is just 24 hours old so not too much to talk about. I too would like some help with latching! I hope now that we are in the recovery room we can focus on all of the things we have to learn about parenthood.

Munchkin, what are your latching issues? Did my earlier answers help?

With a csection, a nursing pillow (and stool) were very helpful with my first. I also nursed lying down when that became possible (I had complicated wound care for six to eight weeks).

Your facility hopefully has a lactation counselor who can provide hands-on, sometimes literally!, guidance. Ask for her to come by.

Good luck!
post #6 of 238
I don't have many suggestions as I'm very new at this and have been blessed with a great little nurseling so far... Her latch has been really good from day one but I do have to watch her lips... She likes to tuck them in when she nurses and this prevents her from getting a good latch and it hurts too. I hope u have a smooth transition from the shield smile.gif
post #7 of 238
Thread Starter 

Thanks ladies! I can definitely tell when she gets the big wide opening that the latch is better. I have pulled her off when she's sucking like a straw and tried again. Strange little thing will sometimes latch on okay and sometimes will fuss until I put on the shield. I figure I'll just keep trying the nipple first and then do the shield before she blows up.

 

I do leak little drips but I'm not able to squirt anything. Still though, with DD1 I had flat nipples so I think they tend to get back towards that when I'm too engorged. I have even started her on the shield a bit and then pulled it out, which is a hit or miss. We'll see. I'm just going to keep trying!

post #8 of 238
Mira had her first successful latch in the side lying position last night! Woohoo this will make our night feedings so much easier joy.gif
post #9 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by MountainMama15 View Post

Oh, also, she may be latching well but getting too fast a flow! In that case, I would pull my kids off after letdown, they hated that, and let that first wild spray go directly into some towels. Then I would latch the kiddo back on and nurse as usual.

Typically, at this early stage, I was shooting across the room from the other side so that's how I figured perhaps there was a bit of drinking from the firehouse action going on!

This works for me too. I have a pile of dish towels by the bed for night nursing. I kind of hand express into the towel for half a minute after letdown. I couldn't believe the first time I shot one of the girls in the face with spraying milk. 

 

During the second week I was so engorged I had to pump off a quick ounce before the babies could get a good latch and gulp fast enough. Here we are a week later and now I am worried about keeping up my supply for the two of them. The lactation consultant had told me to stop pumping so that my supply would stabilize. But now I wish I had a bigger freezer stash so that someday grandparents can babysit for more than 30min. 

 

Has anybody successfully bf in public yet? I went and hid in a bathroom stall at dinner last night. My girls latch well with a little help positioning. I just don't understand the logistics of pulling out my boob and latching baby blindly under a cover of any kind. When we have visitors at home I feel like it's easy to read their comfort level. I've done everything from carrying on a conversation shirtless with one baby on each boob to walking out of the room with a towel draped over me. But in public with 3 week old twins I feel like everyones eyes are on us and there never seems to be a private corner. DF even asked me to cover up while I was nursing in the car this weekend. Grrr, if people want to ogle half my boob through tinted windows in a parking lot I don't really care. 

post #10 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munchkin08 View Post

Our LO is just 24 hours old so not too much to talk about. I too would like some help with latching! I hope now that we are in the recovery room we can focus on all of the things we have to learn about parenthood.

so its not a latching question after all. Hers is great!

my milk hasn't come in. And I get this is only night 2.

how often do you nurse?

my mother said its best to get on a schedule. Ex nurse 9, 12, 3pm, 6, 9pm.

is this ok? What if lo isn't settled in between feedings?
post #11 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munchkin08 View Post


so its not a latching question after all. Hers is great!

my milk hasn't come in. And I get this is only night 2.

how often do you nurse?

my mother said its best to get on a schedule. Ex nurse 9, 12, 3pm, 6, 9pm.

is this ok? What if lo isn't settled in between feedings?

 

It'll come soon!  Doing awesome, mama!!

 

I'd be careful nursing on a schedule. (though it seems to be a common suggestion from older generations)  Granted, I am very pro-nursing on demand, but I also think it makes things so much easier.  But the thing with schedules is that it seems moms are far more likely to encounter supply issues or other nursing troubles by trying to make it strict.  Babies tummies are only the size of a small marble early on, they're going to digest super quickly, and trying to get them to eat by the clock just seems to be asking for trouble (with hunger and sleep, etc).  I know a lot of women seem to pull it off, but it also appears to be the same group who have to end up supplementing or have fussier babies.  That's not science, just based on what I've noticed, but again, I think that nursing on demand just makes life easier.  

 

If they nurse a TOOOOOOON I don't think there is anything wrong with spacing things out a bit every now and then, but block feeding can help with that too, because they'll stay full a bit longer on that thicker hindmilk.

post #12 of 238
We have to supplement with formula to be allowed to leave the hospital. I realize we are operating within a system. Once home is there a better formula over another? What about nipple confusion?
post #13 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1babysmom View Post

 

It'll come soon!  Doing awesome, mama!!

 

I'd be careful nursing on a schedule. (though it seems to be a common suggestion from older generations)  Granted, I am very pro-nursing on demand, but I also think it makes things so much easier.  But the thing with schedules is that it seems moms are far more likely to encounter supply issues or other nursing troubles by trying to make it strict.  Babies tummies are only the size of a small marble early on, they're going to digest super quickly, and trying to get them to eat by the clock just seems to be asking for trouble (with hunger and sleep, etc).  I know a lot of women seem to pull it off, but it also appears to be the same group who have to end up supplementing or have fussier babies.  That's not science, just based on what I've noticed, but again, I think that nursing on demand just makes life easier.  

 

If they nurse a TOOOOOOON I don't think there is anything wrong with spacing things out a bit every now and then, but block feeding can help with that too, because they'll stay full a bit longer on that thicker hindmilk.

 

Just gonna second this! Also, if you allow her to nurse on demand likely your milk will come in sooner...

 

Is there a reason why they are not allowing you to leave until your milk comes in?  Three days is totally normal.  Is there an LC on staff? 

post #14 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munchkin08 View Post

We have to supplement with formula to be allowed to leave the hospital. I realize we are operating within a system. Once home is there a better formula over another? What about nipple confusion?

Why do you have to supplement in order to leave the hospital?

I wouldn't worry about your milk not in yet.. it can take quite  few days.  As long as baby is peeing and pooping a bit that's what's important.

Don't worry about a schedule during the newborn age.. just one more thing to have to stress over. as 1babysmom said,  their tummies are tiny and its best to feed when baby says they're hungry.  The baby will likely set their own schedule or pattern soon enough.

As far as formula, they're all basically the same.  Some are formulated for special needs like gas, fussiness, spit-up and soy, but I think it takes a while to know for sure that your baby requires one of those.  Just start with a basic one and see how the baby responds for several days.  From my own experience, I see a quality difference between name brand and generic; name brand mixes better without clumping in the bottle.

For nipple confusion, it's obviously best to stick to nursing only for as long as possible.  If you do a bottle, try having someone else offer it so the baby isn't confused about different sources coming from MOM.  When they latch on to the bottle, make sure it looks like the latch on the breast; I ususally have to flip my baby's lips out for her when she takes the bottle, hoping she'll stay consistent when switching back and forth.  

There's no denying that breastfeeding is best, but don't feel bad or like you've failed if you do have to supplement... every mother/baby is different and it's your choice what needs to be done.  I started supplementing at 4 days, even though I had breastfed my others for 1 1/2 and 2 years each.  It just wasn't the right fit with this baby and our home situation, and I'm at peace with it now, knowing she's content and growing.

post #15 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1babysmom View Post

 

It'll come soon!  Doing awesome, mama!!

 

I'd be careful nursing on a schedule. (though it seems to be a common suggestion from older generations)  Granted, I am very pro-nursing on demand, but I also think it makes things so much easier.  But the thing with schedules is that it seems moms are far more likely to encounter supply issues or other nursing troubles by trying to make it strict.  Babies tummies are only the size of a small marble early on, they're going to digest super quickly, and trying to get them to eat by the clock just seems to be asking for trouble (with hunger and sleep, etc).  I know a lot of women seem to pull it off, but it also appears to be the same group who have to end up supplementing or have fussier babies.  That's not science, just based on what I've noticed, but again, I think that nursing on demand just makes life easier.  

 

If they nurse a TOOOOOOON I don't think there is anything wrong with spacing things out a bit every now and then, but block feeding can help with that too, because they'll stay full a bit longer on that thicker hindmilk.

Yes!!! Everything she said!!!! Drop the damn schedule once you leave. Heck, we started just filling out their little nursing and diaper sheets with whatever they wanted to hear, regardless of whether or not the baby nursed or wet or pooped. It's all so ridiculous.

 

Here's the deal- the baby's tummy is, like 1babysmom said, the size of a marble and doesn't grow that fast. There is a reason nature doesn't make your milk come in right away- the baby can't handle  it. It infuriates me when people say "Nurse for twenty minutes on each side!" Then your nipples hurt and it's for NOTHING. I don't even wake up my babies to eat. They know when they are hungry. What cracks me up is they feed the babies all this formula (for the formula moms) and then the babies spit it all up and they say 'Oh! They have reflux!" No... they don't... they just can't handle all the fluids.

 

Munchkin, with my first I did everything "they" said and ended up not breastfeeding in the end. With my second I was fortunate enough to be given a DVD put out by a midwife on breastfeeding and she explained baby's tummy size and nature and the importance of letting things just happen. I followed her advice with #2 (who was a c-section) and it was MUCH MUCH better. When the nurses tried to make me fill out their schedule, I smiled, nodded, and wrote what they wanted. My son was fine and full doing things my way. If I were you, I would not give the baby any formula once you leave. Forget it. That's just my opinion though and you have to go with your gut. Hugs!

post #16 of 238
Thread Starter 

I agree with everything said. No scheduling, just feed on demand. We got a 6 hour window of sleep followed by a 4 hour last night. It's heavenly!

post #17 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munchkin08 View Post


so its not a latching question after all. Hers is great!

my milk hasn't come in. And I get this is only night 2.

how often do you nurse?

my mother said its best to get on a schedule. Ex nurse 9, 12, 3pm, 6, 9pm.

is this ok? What if lo isn't settled in between feedings?

 

I took a LC class as part of my doula training a couple months ago.  You need to start pumping with a hospital grade pump or double electric pump and that will help your milk come in. Put baby on first and make sure her latch is correct, even if your milk hasn't come in yet.  Sometimes you need to get firm with hospital staff to get that pump, as most will let you use theirs at the hospital. Nurse on demand - especially in the beginning. As they get older they will regulate themselves.

 

Also nipple confusion isn't as common as one would think. What babies actually get is flow confusion. They get this faster flow from the bottle than the breast when there' not milk yet. Once your milk comes in baby should latch right on regardless if they got a bottle or not.

 

With DS1 I left the hospital before my milk came in. It too another 3 days after leaving the hospital before my milk came in and I never supplemented. Yes DS was cranky but he was getting colostrum so he was good. 

 

momma-bear - I nursed my babies in public all the time, but I'm not sure what to tell you with twins. Do they always eat at the same time? If not I'd say just nurse one at a time in public and don't worry about covering up.

post #18 of 238
Thank you all! Getting discharged today. wink1.gif
post #19 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munchkin08 View Post

We have to supplement with formula to be allowed to leave the hospital. I realize we are operating within a system. Once home is there a better formula over another? What about nipple confusion?

No nipple confusion will result if you use an SNS (supplemental nursing system). It allows baby to get breast milk and extra whatever (milk or formula) while nursing at the same time. I believe hospitals prescribe them.
post #20 of 238

Yea!  Welcome home Munchkin.  My DD1 nursed on demand and did a lot of cluster feeding before going to sleep, or she would fall asleep and then wake up and nurse some more.  I never knew what to tell the pediatrician when they asked how many times she nursed in a day, because sometimes it just seemed like one day long nursing session!  lol.gif  But she peed, pooped and grew, so it was all good!  I would second the suggestion of pumping if you are also supplementing.  It seems supplementing would make it take longer for your milk to come in, as there is less demand, when baby is getting part of her feeding from another source.  

 

I really recommend the Le Leche League's book on breastfeeding.  That reminds me, I loaned mine out and need to get it back.

 

Awesome thread!  Thanks Tiffany!  Sorry I do not have any experience with using a nipple shield.  

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