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"I'm shocked people still use..."

post #1 of 73
Thread Starter 

I am at work listening to someone use an adding machine.  Not the most unusual thing, but I find Excel also works very nicely.  There are also some old electric typewriters around my office that people actually use sometimes.  I was shocked when I found that out.  What are you surprised people still use?

post #2 of 73

When I was a kid, my family still used a wringer washing machine. 

post #3 of 73
My mom used a scythe to cut some portions of our (tony NY country home) lawn.
post #4 of 73

I gotta get me a scythe.  That would make yard work easier!

post #5 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by pokeyAC View Post

I am at work listening to someone use an adding machine.  Not the most unusual thing, but I find Excel also works very nicely.  There are also some old electric typewriters around my office that people actually use sometimes.  I was shocked when I found that out.  What are you surprised people still use?

 

Hm. Not surprised, but we still use a manual typewriter occasionally, mostly for craft projects.  

 

We have an abacus.  We don't use it, but I have older relatives who are pretty quick with it. And slide rulers. 

post #6 of 73

I tend to be more surprised over things people have begun using, rather than old technologies they still use. But then, I'm weird. I'm 26, yet I prefer a treadle sewing machine to an electric, hands down, I'd rather manually grind my own coffee beans than use an electric grinder, I love coffee, but despise electric coffee makers, I won't even look at an electric can opener, I insist my children learn to use an abacus, and I find the concept of browsing the internet on a phone to be obnoxious and unnecessary. I also have a Queen Wringer Washer on my wishlist. I think we opt for the more modern option incredibly frequently when the more traditional options are actually better. Sure, there are modern conveniences that are improvements, but I think we've gone overboard.

post #7 of 73

We have 2 electric typewriters that are the most played with things in our house--my kids LOVE them (and they're really cheap at thrift stores) :)  

post #8 of 73
I don't know what an adding machine is but I did work at a place where they still used a typewriter for forms about 10 years ago. I haven't seen them since then though. I
post #9 of 73

For some tasks, I actually prefer to work on an adding machine than a spreadsheet (and I really, really like spreadsheets - I always have). I kind of miss them.


 I can't really think of anything that surprises me much. My family have always held onto things and used them long after most people have given up on them. (I was still desperately trying to cling to my old Walkman - the cassette type - when MP3 players were making an appearance, and it took me years to switch from vinyl. I only did, because it became almost impossible to find.)

post #10 of 73
Quote:
I tend to be more surprised over things people have begun using, rather than old technologies they still use. But then, I'm weird. I'm 26, yet I prefer a treadle sewing machine to an electric, hands down, I'd rather manually grind my own coffee beans than use an electric grinder, I love coffee, but despise electric coffee makers, I won't even look at an electric can opener, I insist my children learn to use an abacus, and I find the concept of browsing the internet on a phone to be obnoxious and unnecessary. I also have a Queen Wringer Washer on my wishlist. I think we opt for the more modern option incredibly frequently when the more traditional options are actually better.

Intriguing. What do you find better about them? I know old treadle sewing machines are meant to be well-made, but do they actually produce a neater stitch or offer more control, or is it more of a psychological benefit - feeling connected to seamstresses of the past or what-have-you?

 

I really can't see the appeal of a wringer-type washing machine. Does it get clothes cleaner than a modern machine? (Heck, even if it did, I'd take my perfectly adequate walk-away-and-let-it-do-its-thing model...)

 

I never learned to use an abacus. No-one ever taught me. I therefore assume using one requires arcane, quasi-mystical skill.

 

We hang out in a geek crowd, which tends to be pretty pro-technology, so we don't have too many obsolescent artifacts. :p DH can wield a sword and shoot a recurve bow, though; does that count?

post #11 of 73
Thread Starter 

I prefer the old school can opener.  When I moved in with DW, we switched to her can opener that cuts through the side so you have a smooth cut.  She wasn't home when I tried to open a can for the first time, and I could not figure out how to do it.  dizzy.gif  I had to dig through some stuff in the closet to find my old one and then I got the can open. 

post #12 of 73

Our apt. has a Chambers stove - the gas oven and grill have to be lit with a match. That's always fun to show people. It's this one:

http://www.antiquestoveheaven.com/images/chambers4.jpg

 

We also use a non-electric push mower, but I think those made a comeback - Target sells them! Maybe it's because of all the people in cities with small lawns.

 

I have an old egg beater that we use occasionally that looks like this - http://www.ebay.com/itm/EKCO-HAND-MIXER-EGG-BEATER-OLIVE-GREEN-HANDLE-VGUC-/171040437668?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27d2cdf5a4

 

I also own my grandmother's abacus, but have no idea how to add with it!

 

What I lament: the demise of the non-power car door. I really always prefereed the regular non-power lock/knob and handle for rolling the window up and down.

post #13 of 73

Oops! Didn't actually say what I was surprised to see people use! My step-dad used a corded dial phone until he could no longer get through phone trees - at the time I couldn't understand why he didn't want a cordless. He also uses a percolater coffee pot on the stove - have you ever had percolated aka overboiled coffee? twins.gif nasty.

post #14 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

 and it took me years to switch from vinyl. I only did, because it became almost impossible to find.)

 

Vinyl is still pretty popular with some people. I have a friend with a huge vinyl collection. DS is excited because his band is releasing an album on vinyl. In fact, he just got word today that the records have arrived. He and his bandmates are organizing right now to pick them up. I think he would run to get them immediately but he has a previous commitment to tutor someone this afternoon and with exams around the corner, he can't bail on her. 

post #15 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragana View Post

What I lament: the demise of the non-power car door. I really always prefereed the regular non-power lock/knob and handle for rolling the window up and down.

 

I don't mind power windows, in general. I hate the one on the driver side of my minivan. When I push it down, even very briefly, it keeps going on its own. I rarely want my window all the way open, as there's too much noise, and too much wind. So, I have to start over putting it back up, and concentrate on it more than if they didn't have the automatic feature.

 

I like dial phones.

 

Abacuses are pretty simple to use - I looked it up for dd1 once - but I assume they require some practice if you want any speed.

 

I'm a fuddy-duddy, and don't like change. I still use a naptha/white gas camp stove, as I don't like propane cylinders. I'm still mourning the death of my nice, simple flip phone, which died a few months ago. I hate touch screen phones.

post #16 of 73
I still use an adding maching when I do the banking at work. I need to be ale to print out receipt tapes, and it wastes much less paper than doing it in Excel. But using Excel is an interesting idea. I may have to give that a try sometime.
post #17 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinuviel_k View Post

I still use an adding maching when I do the banking at work. I need to be ale to print out receipt tapes, and it wastes much less paper than doing it in Excel. But using Excel is an interesting idea. I may have to give that a try sometime.

 

I've tried Excel (and Lotus 123) for that. It works okay, but I find the adding machine to be the best tool for the job when you're attaching the tapes.

post #18 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokering View Post

Intriguing. What do you find better about them? I know old treadle sewing machines are meant to be well-made, but do they actually produce a neater stitch or offer more control, or is it more of a psychological benefit - feeling connected to seamstresses of the past or what-have-you?

 

I really can't see the appeal of a wringer-type washing machine. Does it get clothes cleaner than a modern machine? (Heck, even if it did, I'd take my perfectly adequate walk-away-and-let-it-do-its-thing model...)

 

I never learned to use an abacus. No-one ever taught me. I therefore assume using one requires arcane, quasi-mystical skill.

 

We hang out in a geek crowd, which tends to be pretty pro-technology, so we don't have too many obsolescent artifacts. :p DH can wield a sword and shoot a recurve bow, though; does that count?


Treadles are better made and offer more control. I make fewer errors on a treadle.

 

As for the washer, the one I have in mind uses less water and is more efficient than most modern machines, and I don't mind wringing before drying.

 

I'm a recovering geek. Once upon a time, I was a business solutions software programmer, loved gadgets, and artificial intelligence programming was my main hobby. Then I realized technology ate my life, and took a step back. All in all, I'm just a happier, healthier person stepping away from it where practical.

post #19 of 73

I have a good friend who resisted getting a cell phone for as long as possible. He finally gave up when he got stranded somewhere and couldn't find a pay phone, because so many people have cell phones that pay phones are becoming uncommon.

 

I've been tempted to make a Russian-style hexidecimal abacus, even though Windows comes with a calculator program that can do hexidecimal. And it's not like I need to crunch hexidecimal numbers that often.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ragana View Post

What I lament: the demise of the non-power car door. I really always prefereed the regular non-power lock/knob and handle for rolling the window up and down.

 

I actually bought a 2012  Nissan Versa with manual everything... I can't say I share your sentiment. I actually added an extra $700 on my loan to get auto-locks installed, but apparently the guys that do that don't work on weekends, so for the last six months I've been unlocking my car with a key like some kind of barbarian! It wouldn't be so bad except only one of the doors has a keyhole. It would really suck if I had young kids.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

I'm a fuddy-duddy, and don't like change. I still use a naptha/white gas camp stove, as I don't like propane cylinders. I'm still mourning the death of my nice, simple flip phone, which died a few months ago. I hate touch screen phones.

 

I so like it when portable devices flip closed. That way the screen doesn't get damaged so easily. And in the case of phones, it's harder to butt-dial someone.

post #20 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinuviel_k View Post

I still use an adding maching when I do the banking at work. I need to be ale to print out receipt tapes, and it wastes much less paper than doing it in Excel. But using Excel is an interesting idea. I may have to give that a try sometime.

Yes, and if you are carrying it around for adding somewhere else, it's just faster to punch the numbers in on an adding machine than a laptop keyboard, and it has a smaller footprint in most cases.  

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