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stress and vaccination

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Found this in MV, but thought it might make for an interesting discussion here:

 

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/brainwaves/2013/05/20/why-feeling-anxious-about-a-vaccine-makes-it-more-effective-and-other-benefits-of-short-term-stress/

 

Blech.

post #2 of 6

Blech is right

post #3 of 6
Funny. In the knee surgery study the number of immune cells increased in the first mention of the study. The second mention of the study said the number of immune cells increased in some, remained constant in some, and *decreased* in some.

So the first reference to the study was incorrect. The study showed mixed results. That means that no general conclusion can be accurately drawn.
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

This was the part that made me go blech:

 

 

"A nurse expertly injects his son’s thigh with a vaccine. For half a second, nothing changes. Then the child stops moving; his eyes widen; his face twists into misery as he begins to cry. Meanwhile, the nurse has not missed a beat, injecting several more vaccines. As she leaves she turns to the camera and says, “Sorry I couldn’t make him cry more.”

Dhabhar likes to film babies crying when they get their shots; he knows that the wailing is a good sign—so do the nurses in the hospitals he frequents."

 

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

Here is my problem with the article:

 

Mice that were stressed out before vaccination had a better immune response to vaccines.  I went digging, and it turns out they were stressed for 2.5 hours prior to vaccination.  The knee surgery patients were stressed, perhaps for days, before their surgery.

 

Patients are not stressed before vaccination, unless they are old enough to know what is going on.  The might be stressed right after a shot, and then get a few more shots, but the shots are given in fairly quick order.  Mice stressed for hours before the shot are not really comparable to humans stressed after the shot, or perhaps for a few seconds before the next shot.

 

While stress may augment vaccine effectiveness, it would be interesting to see if it also augments vaccine reactions.  

 

The mice study said this:(http://ajpregu.physiology.org/content/early/2005/05/12/ajpregu.00145.2005.full.pdf)

 

 

"However, such immuno-enhancement may also contribute to stress- induced exacerbation of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases."

 

Fever is an immune response.   MMR vaccine can cause serious fever, and febrile seizures.  Those who have febrile seziures are slightly more likely to have epilepsy.  Could stressing out a child make them more likely to have a immune-response-associated side effect?  

 


Edited by kathymuggle - 5/21/13 at 7:26am
post #6 of 6

 

 

Quote:

Fever is an immune response.   MMR vaccine can cause serious fever, and febrile seizures.  Those who have febrile seziures are slightly more likely to have epilepsy.  Could stressing out a child make them more likely to have a immune-response-associated side effect?  

 

i would think so...a child who experiences life at a more intense negative  level would have more of a negative response in regards to vaxing, imo.  My first dd is extremely intense and reacted with extreme emotion with any negative experience, thereby causing herself more stress. 

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