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What can I decline in the hospital? - Page 2

post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by erigeron View Post

So what if you are in another position than on your back? Is your care provider going to push you over? Can't you just refuse to get on your back? I would fight that one. If your care provider is sympathetic, you may have better odds there. 

The wheelchair may be a reinforcement of patient status, but also it saves you some energy at a time when you need it, so I'm in favor of that. I wouldn't have wanted to walk 500 feet carrying my daughter on post-partum day 2 if I could avoid it. 
Heres what happens with birthing on your back....before you start pushing they have you lie down on your back for a cervical check, during which the bed is broken down, raised up, lighting etc to deliver on your back. It can be tough to haul yourself back up and get back in a good pushing position at that point. So prep you husband to help you up! They may freak if its harder to see, but your comfort has got to trump theirs at such a crucial point.
post #22 of 32

I know I got a cervical check while in a vertical position. The details are fuzzy but I was laboring on the toilet and wanted to poop because I had a lot of rectal pressure and the student midwife wanted to check me first so I let her. I don't remember if I was still on the toilet or stood up/squatted on floor but I know we didn't leave the bathroom and I definitely didn't lie down on the bathroom floor. So another potential solution there, if you're laboring standing, would be to not lie down for a check. 

post #23 of 32

Distinguish between permanent and non permanent.

 

For instance, stuff like what you are wearing while you labour, or how you walk/ride over the hospital threshold, are all impermanent. If you're in a wheelchair for a few minutes, you can get back up and walk around after. If you're wearing a hospital gown, you can take it off later and wear what you want.

 

There are things that are permanent! For instance, an accidentally circumcised baby is without his foreskin for the rest of his life, which is a huge huge deal. Those are the things to focus on.

post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by meow2013 View Post

As for the wheelchair, why are they discharging me if I can't even walk out to the front door?  It's just a reinforcement of your status, nothing more.

 

 

Because sometimes after your baby is born, you may feel like someone beat your butt with a baseball bat . . . that isn't a reason to stay in a hospital, but be aware that childbirth can be HARD on your body, even natural childbirth, and often especially with your first baby.  You may say a million thanks later for that very same wheelchair!  I had a birth center birth, and when it was time to walk out to the car (4 hours after baby was born), I wanted to cry and wished I had a wheelchair!  Heck, a week later I still wished I had one!  

 

I understand your concerns with the hospital, I'd be freaking out too!  But I'd save your energy for invasive things (ivs, shots, taking baby to nursery) and enjoy the pampering (wheelchairs, etc.).  Maybe they aren't doing it to pamper, but you can chose to look at it that way.  

 

Anyway, I hope you get your birth center birth!  I loved mind and wouldn't trade those experiences for the world!

post #25 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichelleZB View Post

Distinguish between permanent and non permanent.

 

For instance, stuff like what you are wearing while you labour, or how you walk/ride over the hospital threshold, are all impermanent. If you're in a wheelchair for a few minutes, you can get back up and walk around after. If you're wearing a hospital gown, you can take it off later and wear what you want.

 

There are things that are permanent! For instance, an accidentally circumcised baby is without his foreskin for the rest of his life, which is a huge huge deal. Those are the things to focus on.

 

They can be emotionally permanent.  

post #26 of 32
They can be emotionally permanent.  
[/quote]
This is true. Birth is powerful and you will remember how you felt forever. Not exactly what happened, but how you FELT about it, which ultimately only you control.

I think they want a wheelchair to the door because if you feel faint (you are losing blood) and fall you could sue. If its a big deal to you i respect that. But speaking as a person who declined practically everything, i did actually request the wheelchair...i chose to leave a few hours after birth and it really hurt to walk. Plus that way i could snuggle the baby the whole way out, rather than use a carseat or hospital crib, my older child even fit in the chair with me; it is actually one of my nicest memories of the birth, not a bad one. I hope you get the bc birth!!
Edited by myra1 - 6/7/13 at 12:48pm
post #27 of 32

Meow, I think you need to have some sense of scale.  Sure, the wheelchair might matter to you forever, if it's that important to you.  But there are a million things in this scenario that are going to matter, and you can't possibly control all of them.  You need to make some choices about where to invest your physical and emotional energy.  Sometimes, those decisions may involve ceding some control - letting a thing or two go, because there are things you care about more.

 

I suspect that there are things you care about more then the wheelchair.  Am I wrong?

 

I can absolutely have a conversation about how to avoid ever touching a wheelchair or a hospital johnnie, if those are your priorities.

post #28 of 32

To the best of my knowledge, HIV testing, Vit K injections, and eye ointment are required in some states. You cannot avoid them (unless you find a care provider willing to turn a blind eye).

post #29 of 32

I didn't want to ride out of the hospital in a wheelchair either, but after having a bunch of things happen to me that I didn't want during my induction, which led to a cesarean, I figured I didn't have a shot of making my wishes known. That was actually one thing that just went my way! The nurse I had when I was checking out said something like, "You don't want to ride in a wheelchair, do you?" (I guess she was really good at reading people) and just walked me down to the car, with her hand on my back to keep me steady. I will note, I was a little bit dizzy when I walked out. If I had lost more blood, I think it would have been wise for me to use the wheelchair.

 

I do actually think about this frequently, after feeling completely out of control in the birthing process, I was allowed to leave the hospital the way I wanted, which made me feel a little bit better.

 

I agree with other posters, I think there are bigger issues, but there ARE hospitals out there that will allow you to walk yourself to the car.

post #30 of 32

No hospital will kick you out but some will call CPS.  My advice is to forget the doula and have a lawyer attend your birth.

post #31 of 32

I disagree with those that say the wheelchair / gown are no big deal.  I ended up in a conventional hospital (instead of a homebirth) when I went into labor at 33 weeks, and went into the hospital with nothing but a water bottle and wearing my favorite sweats.  It was important to me that I had control of the situation, that I walked up to the room and that I walked out of the room.  (NOTE - they would not budge on not letting me walk for an hour and until I'd peed, non negotiable.)  It was very important to me that I not wear a hospital gown.  (I took my pants off when the baby was coming and had no problem finding them afterwards - they weren't dirty.)  I also drank my water the whole time and did not get on the bed until the very end... which next time, by the way, I would not do - next time, I'd do the last pushing kneeling or such on the floor.  I took all the cushions off the couch and made a floor mat to labor on. :) We did not do eye ointment, hep B, or vit K.  I had my midwife with me, acting as doula, and would absolutely not do a hospital birth without a level headed advocate; she kept the staff from doing things before I'd had a chance to answer.. Our nurse was bemused by the whole thing, but everything went pretty smoothly with the staff. I was polite but firm as was my midwife/doula.  Do what is right for you!  

post #32 of 32
I've had 2 vaginal births. I was never offered a wheel chair either time when I was leaving the hospital (though I would have appreciated it after my first birth as I had a zillion of stitches and walking hurt like hell) I did stay overnight at the hospital, didn't leave early after the births though so maybe that's why?
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