or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Special Needs Parenting › Just realizing sensory issues could be bigger deal than I thought
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Just realizing sensory issues could be bigger deal than I thought

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I need you wise wise women to talk to me about sensory issues. My little 5 year old dd has always had little quirks but I have never placed to much significance on them. What I am noticing right now is sucking on her clothes. She has always rubbed her nose with her blanket which is made of a soft fuzzy fabric. She rubs the tip of her stuffed bunnies ears over her nose. She sucks and chews on them. She cannot tolerate underpants or anything in her crotch(ie pants, biker shorts, bathing suit) without CONSTANT fussing around. Cannot tolerate tags, jeans, itchy(to her) seams, elastic smocking on dresses, shoes are a whole deal where I have to bring her to try them on, have her walk around in them and then still keep the receipt because she is so finicky about the fit. She is pretty good with food, likes to eat quite a bit actually, but comments about things like soda fizz always making her eyes sting in the beginning. That goes something like this, "When you first drink sprite it makes your eyes sting a little, doesn't it Mommy?" every. single. time. She repeats herself almost immediately a lot of the time. Like she is scared we don't hear her, at least that is the impression I have gotten. She talks under her breath to herself. And then there is my husband. She has issues of his own. He can't handle the sound of gum being chewed, things being slurped, things being "smacked" as in chewed in a certain way. He likes his arm to be stroked as a way to relax. I don't relate to any of this but I just thought they were weird quirks. Is there more to this and what do I need to know? I want to be a better more supportive person for my family is there is something I should know about, I want to know about it, y'know?
post #2 of 9

This web site has a ton of information:

http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com/

 

My favorite book on sensory stuff is:

"the out of sync child"

 

One of the things that helps sensory issues is to figure out what "sensory diet" works for your child, and then make sure that she gets it. This is pinpointing the type of sensory input that is therapeutic for her. Working with an occupational therapist would be the quickest way to do this, but you may be able to figure it pretty much on your own (I used The Out of Syn Child to figure it out). It's different things for different kids. For my DD, activities where her whole body was moving through space in different positions were ideal, so gymnastics class, competitive swimming, etc were really great for her. For other kids, its more about getting to play in substances with different textures.

 

My thought on your first thread is that if you find ways to appropriately address her sensory needs, she may be less inclined to express those needs in ways that you find troubling. It's possible that the best way to address her issues at school lay in activities that she could do outside of school.

 

I'm pretty sure my DH has sensory issues as well. winky.gif

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you for your response, I will look into getting my hand on the book and check out the website tonight :)

post #4 of 9
Everyone has their little "quirks" and processes sensory input in different ways. there is no eight way to process sensory information. however, if it starts getting in the way of function (or if you feel your child is having to work harder than their peers), then its a problem and would suggest an OT evaluation. sensory processing is the basis for what we do and if there are problems it can impact fine/gross motor skills, emotional development, speech/language, and social interactions. Again, if its not getting in the way of functioning, many people live fulfilling lives with "quirks." also, sensory processing is very individual, so challenges can impact us in different ways-and therefore one may not "fit" into a particular category. hope this helps. good luck with everything smile.gif
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedscst View Post

Everyone has their little "quirks" and processes sensory input in different ways. there is no eight way to process sensory information. however, if it starts getting in the way of function (or if you feel your child is having to work harder than their peers), then its a problem and would suggest an OT evaluation. sensory processing is the basis for what we do and if there are problems it can impact fine/gross motor skills, emotional development, speech/language, and social interactions. Again, if its not getting in the way of functioning, many people live fulfilling lives with "quirks." also, sensory processing is very individual, so challenges can impact us in different ways-and therefore one may not "fit" into a particular category. hope this helps. good luck with everything smile.gif

Yes, after reading the recommended website last night my brain was swimming.  My daughter does have a lot of these quirks.  As you say, though, she seems to function pretty normally to me.  Her teacher has never mentioned anything unusual about how she functions in class, actually she only ever gets glowing remarks from all of her teachers.  I don't know what to make of it all.

post #6 of 9

Because of your other thread:

http://www.mothering.com/community/t/1383787/keeping-clothes-clean-whose-responsibility-how-do-you-handle

I suspect that your DD's behaviors get on your nerves a bit. I suspect that *if* her behaviors are in any way caused by or made worse by sensory issues, that she really isn't going to be able to change them without addressing the sensory issues. The most you can hope for is to drive one undesirable behavior into a different behavior (which may or may not be desirable) because she is seeking a way to meet a need.

 

Teachers don't tend to mention things until they are pretty big. She is 5 and if she is in a quality program, it allows for a variety of sensory learning experiences because those are considered age appropriate. However, as she progresses in school, if she is in a traditional school, her sensory issues could become more and more of an issue.

 

Everything we ever did to address my DD's sensory issues was fun for her. Every single thing. And it helped her think more clearly and function more comfortably in the world.

 

You are right that at present, this isn't that big of a problem. I would recommend finding fun ways to address it, though, rather than waiting for it to become a Huge Problem.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

I'm happy to help her in any way I can, I just feel overwhelmed, frankly, and don't know where to go from here.

post #8 of 9

I suggest reading a book about sensory integration and start trying some ideas. The book I read was "the out of sync child."  However, that was over a decade ago and at the time, it was the only book on this issue. Now there are a bunch to chose to from, and based on the Amazon reviews, some of them are more practical

 

The Out of Sync Child Has Fun gets great reviews, and is said to be more accessible:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0399532714/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=1535523722&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=0399531653&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0CQ9KEBASC7Z4PW9ZVD0

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Ordered it :)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Special Needs Parenting
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Special Needs Parenting › Just realizing sensory issues could be bigger deal than I thought