or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Selective & Delayed Vaccination › Might vaccinate this time around
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Might vaccinate this time around

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

With my previous kids I was involved with someone different and we both agreed with not vaccinating. This time I'm with a new partner and he's not convinced that vaccinating isn't for the best. I'm trying to keep an open mind but I don't really know where to start on finding objective information. Full schedule vs delayed schedule. What to avoid completely, what are safest, etc. Everyone here seems really knowledgeable so I figured I'd ask here.

post #2 of 8

There are a lot of knowledgable peopleon the vaccine forums. 

 

if you do not get enough answers, consider posting on the main vaccine page.  

 

Welcome to MDC!

 

kathy

post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesilence View Post

With my previous kids I was involved with someone different and we both agreed with not vaccinating. This time I'm with a new partner and he's not convinced that vaccinating isn't for the best. I'm trying to keep an open mind but I don't really know where to start on finding objective information. Full schedule vs delayed schedule. What to avoid completely, what are safest, etc. Everyone here seems really knowledgeable so I figured I'd ask here.

 

here is  a place your partner can start his research on what he wants injected and why, into his child

Here are some questions to answer for yourself in deciding about vaccination:

1. Name of the disease
2. Description of the disease
3. Length of time from initial infection to end of all symptoms
4. Infectious period
5. Normal symptoms of the disease
6. Known serious consequences of the disease
7. Proportion of persons infected developing serious consequences
8. Transmission route of the disease
9. Prevalence of the disease
10. Treatments of the disease and efficacy of those treatments
11. Relevant research about the disease
12. Name of the vaccine
13. Company that makes the vaccine
14. Contents of the vaccine
14A. The significance of whether or not the vaccine is live
15. History of development of the vaccine
16. Known side-effects of the vaccine and rate of incidence of those side-effects
17. Possible side-effects not yet acknowledged by the vaccine maker
18. Relevant research into the vaccine
19. How effective is the vaccine at preventing the disease?
20.What is the vaccine meant to do? (Many vaccines are not meant to prevent infection or transmission).
21.Number of cases reported each year.
22.Number of deaths reported each year from the vaccine and natural disease.

Here are some sources to help you out:

Vaccines: The Risks, The Benefits, The Choices 1/18 DVD, By Sherri J. TENPENNY-http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OORHqEedtUY



http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwr_wk.html (download the current issue)

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/pink-chapters.htm

http://vaers.hhs.gov/pdf/PackageInserts.pdf

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7018835240451107552&q

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6351515212287981735&hl=en

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/appendices/G/cases&deaths.pdf


WHO GRAPH-http://apps.who.int/immunization_monitoring/en/globalsummary/timeseries/tsincidencepol.htm


Beyond Conformity Resources Page- http://www.beyondconformity.org.nz/resources

Do you have a quick-fire summary?- http://www.beyondconformity.org.nz/questions#

Inside Vaccines- http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress/

http://childhealthsafety.wordpress.com/graphs/

http://het.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/05/04/0960327111407644.full.pdf+html
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/appendices/G/cases&deaths.pdf

http://vaers.hhs.gov/index

http://www.thinktwice.com/sids.htm

post #4 of 8
post #5 of 8

I would also say to look into common age for acquiring the disease, age of patient experiencing death/severe illness, and if the disease was the primary cause of death, or if there was a secondary infection.

 

Specifically with chicken pox, the most common problem in young children is high fever (which can be managed with tylenol/motrin) and secondary skin infections (which are also preventable).  Most fatalities were in people after puberty.  This is why some people choose to delay Chicken pox vaccines until a child is older.  

 

I would also specify that you should look at the prevalance of the disease in your area and places were you and your family members travel.  For example, Polio is very rare in the US, but is endemic in India & Pakistan, so if you or your spouse traveled to those areas frequently, you might put Polio higher on your vax list.

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by anj_rn View Post

I would also say to look into common age for acquiring the disease, age of patient experiencing death/severe illness, and if the disease was the primary cause of death, or if there was a secondary infection.

 

Specifically with chicken pox, the most common problem in young children is high fever (which can be managed with tylenol/motrin) and secondary skin infections (which are also preventable).  Most fatalities were in people after puberty.  This is why some people choose to delay Chicken pox vaccines until a child is older.  

 

I would also specify that you should look at the prevalance of the disease in your area and places were you and your family members travel.  For example, Polio is very rare in the US, but is endemic in India & Pakistan, so if you or your spouse traveled to those areas frequently, you might put Polio higher on your vax list.

 

 

I really feel the need to address the hightlighted comment because it is a bad suggestion and should not be followed. Giving acetaminophen to reduce a fever in chickenpox can prolong the illness, by defeating the virus-fighting  benefits of an elevated body temperature. This also goes for the other childhood viral diseases. 

 

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1310&dat=19890906&id=H_NVAAAAIBAJ&sjid=y-EDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5698,1337443

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mirzam View Post

I really feel the need to address the hightlighted comment because it is a bad suggestion and should not be followed. Giving acetaminophen to reduce a fever in chickenpox can prolong the illness, by defeating the virus-fighting  benefits of an elevated body temperature. This also goes for the other childhood viral diseases. 

 

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1310&dat=19890906&id=H_NVAAAAIBAJ&sjid=y-EDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5698,1337443

 

Exactly. I would never consider fever during a viral illness to be a "problem." If there is a fever, it's because it's needed to fight the illness properly. Ever since I read from many sources that fever under 107.6 does not cause brain damage, I've been very relaxed about fever. I've never tried to lower fever in my kids, and no longer for myself, and the highest a fever has ever gotten in my family was 105. I think not lowering fever is a big reason why my kids seem to get over viral illnesses very quickly.

post #8 of 8
I don't use antipyretics either. I am actually very grateful for fever in a healthy child. I stress healthy (fever can also be associated with cancer, stroke, etc).
It is also my understanding that reducing fever during infection overall increases risk of complications and mortality. Regarding chicken pox, children treated with acetaminophen actually take longer to recover, the lesions have a prolonged healing period too.
Apart from hyperthermia due to poisoning or external conditions (ex.car) an undamaged brain should regulate the height of the fever so that infection is controlled without damage to the body by the fever.

OP good luck I hope that you and your partner can reach an agreement that you are comfortable with.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Selective & Delayed Vaccination
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Selective & Delayed Vaccination › Might vaccinate this time around