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HPV infections drop by half because of vaccination - Page 4

post #61 of 68

HPV vaccines and cancer prevention, science vs activism

 

 

Quote:
Abstract
The rationale behind current worldwide human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination programs starts from two basic
premises, 1) that HPV vaccines will prevent cervical cancers and save lives and, 2) have no risk of serious side
effects. Therefore, efforts should be made to get as many pre-adolescent girls vaccinated in order to decrease the
burden of cervical cancer. Careful analysis of HPV vaccine pre- and post-licensure data shows however that both of
these premises are at odds with factual evidence and are largely derived from significant misinterpretation of
available data.

 

post #62 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by fruitfulmomma View Post

Back to the study... I find it interesting that the massive drop only occurred in one age group - the 14 to 19 years. I wonder why that is? Was the uptake among other age groups significantly lower?

 

Also, what about other strains? I think they only studied vax specific strains, I wonder what a study on other strains of hpv would show? Would they show a similar reduction in incidence, a higher rate, the same?

My guess would be that the 14-19 year olds had a higher uptake of the vaccine prior to becoming sexually active. In older age groups, even if they got the vaccine, it might be too late--they might have already gotten HPV. The vaccine has been especially pushed for preteen and young teen girls. When it first came out there was some encouragement towards older teens and young women--not sure if there still is--but not to the same extent. Those groups also may not be visiting a doctor who encourages the vaccine. Pediatricians are used to vaccinating many of their patients; gynecologists probably not so much. I'd imagine many/most women 18-25 see a gynecologist but if gynecologists aren't pushing the vaccine much the uptake in that group will be lower. 

post #63 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by erigeron View Post

 

My guess would be that the 14-19 year olds had a higher uptake of the vaccine prior to becoming sexually active. In older age groups, even if they got the vaccine, it might be too late--they might have already gotten HPV. The vaccine has been especially pushed for preteen and young teen girls. When it first came out there was some encouragement towards older teens and young women--not sure if there still is--but not to the same extent. Those groups also may not be visiting a doctor who encourages the vaccine. Pediatricians are used to vaccinating many of their patients; gynecologists probably not so much. I'd imagine many/most women 18-25 see a gynecologist but if gynecologists aren't pushing the vaccine much the uptake in that group will be lower. 

 

It was offered five years ago to my eldest DD when she was 18, (now 23), by a gynecologist, she declined. I haven't asked her if she has been offered it since, but her answer would be identical.

post #64 of 68

I was offered it by a GP when I was 24, not too long after it came out, but since I was about to get married at that point it seemed sort of pointless; I figured I was with the last sexual partner I intended to have so any damage had already been done. Then I aged out of it so there weren't any subsequent offers. Anyway, kind of off topic. 

 

Also, there has been so much emphasis on getting it before you become sexually active, that I wonder if the older teens/young adults who are already sexually active were less likely to be interested partly because of that. And, of course, some of them doubtless already had HPV anyway. 

post #65 of 68

Teacozy…. you were bringing up stuff on anther thread on HPV, so I thought I would revive this one.  

 

You could be right - it is possible this decrease in HPV will lead to decrease in cervical cancer.  Time will tell.

 

Here are the issues I see that could throw a monkey wrench into the above.

 

1.  Timing.  The study looked at girls from 14-19.  We have no idea how long the vaccine lasts.  If it wears off before people choose what is meant to be one life partner  (which the researchers are saying is around 26), it isn't going to do much good.  Some places are pushing for the vaccine to be given as young as 9; it is given around 13 here.  

 

2.  any disease that has strains can change when vaccines are used.  The HPV vaccine protects against certain strains - when we start to vaccinate heavily, the disease can change as a result and strains that are not in the vaccine canbecome more dominant.  I can think of several (IIRC) where this or something like this happened - pertussis, prevnar, Hib…..  Google serotype replacement and HPV vaccine.


Edited by kathymuggle - 7/1/13 at 9:34am
post #66 of 68
Thread Starter 

Like I said in the other thread, "Nope.  At least two people asked why there weren't any pro vaccine people debating in the thread. I answered and used HPV as an example and someone tried to argue that perhaps Mayo Clinic didn't think HPV caused almost all cervical cancer so I responded.  " 

 

I need to take a break from this thread. If any other pro vaccine people have something useful to add I'd love to hear it!  I just don't like being virtually the only pro vaccine person arguing against 10 anti vaccine people.  Very tiresome. 

post #67 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by teacozy View Post

>


I need to take a break from this thread. If any other pro vaccine people have something useful to add I'd love to hear it!  I just don't like being virtually the only pro vaccine person arguing against 10 anti vaccine people.  Very tiresome.

So questioning and criticizing vaccines makes us "anti-vaccine?" And you only want to debate the issue if you're in the majority?

Well. That's convincing.
post #68 of 68
In all honesty I wouldn't want to be in the minority either. I think we can all agree that this board is really tough and especially if you're basically the only one arguing your point. I mean, we CAN agree on that, can't we??
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