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Our O.T. wants our 7 m.o.fed on reduced schedule - Page 2

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by twockenfuss View Post

Agree.  Agree.  Agree.  Except you have a lot going on trying to take care of you and that little one...I wish there was a means of getting this OT educated without your having to do it.  What we need is some sort of pamphlet or linked research we can present to these professionals (pediatricians included) with the information and wisdom that we've acquired (a lot of which has been iterated here).  Then we could just hand it over and say, "Thank you, but I'm not sure you have ALL the facts."
It would be helpful. There is SO much data though on this subject and so readily accessible. I have just skimmed through about ten links on the role of breastfeeding on sensory development, as well as cognitive and motor and oral, many in relation to premature infants.
post #22 of 28
Can you find a different OT? One who at least is familiar with ebf babies? Seems like shes missing a lot of what i would consider vital knowledge.
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asiago View Post


It would be helpful. There is SO much data though on this subject and so readily accessible. I have just skimmed through about ten links on the role of breastfeeding on sensory development, as well as cognitive and motor and oral, many in relation to premature infants.

There is a TON of data...even in more digestible abstract form...I did a search after my post also...so why are we battling with our children's HCPs?  Ugh.  My pediatrician tried to get me to "stop breast feeding just for 48 hours" so that he could diagnose breast-milk jaundice in my preemie.  Wish I had a pamphlet that said "Bite me."  Instead I said, hmmm...hmmm.  And then complained to my family, did my research, consulted my friends, took care of my itty-bitty, but couldn't muster the energy to educate the doctor. 

post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by bohemianmama21 View Post

Can you find a different OT? One who at least is familiar with ebf babies? Seems like shes missing a lot of what i would consider vital knowledge.

 

In your shoes, I would settle for an OT who could think things through about any babies.  It sounds like she's missing the forest, because she's overly focused on one specific tree.  I don't think the real tangle here is that the OT isn't familiar with breast feeding (although I can see how it looks that way).  I think the real tangle is that the OT is failing to consider the needs of the child.  That makes her a terrible OT.  Someone should point that out to her, and possibly her supervisor, not in a "you need to understand the importance of breastfeeding!" way, but more in a "this is dumb and dangerous advice you are giving, and no therapeutic work can realistically take place if we do not prioritize the physical health and safety of the child."

 

Rule 1 for babies is Feed the baby.  Babies who are not fed do not do well.  They don't grow.  They don't hit developmental milestones.  Well-fed babies lag behind developmental milestones now and then, all the time, and they often catch up.  When a well-fed child comes into therapy for a persistent developmental delay, the therapist can work from the solid base provided by good health and adequate nutrition, and assist that child in doing as well as possible.  By comparison, undernourished children can suffer lifelong health problems that therapy can't get them over. 

post #25 of 28
Well I am an OT so I think I know where your OT was coming from in her recommendation. Now, I don't know the specifics about your child so can't give any advise for her treatment...but hopefully can help clarify things. My impression is that your OT is likely concerned about your daughter's oral motor development. Some research does point to the delay of solids being linked with oral motor delays. Now these studies do not compare bottle fed infants vs. Breastfed infants ( all babies are grouped together) and in my experience as both an OT and a mother who exclusively breastfeeds I find that oral motor development in EBF infants is typically superior. My thought is that your OT may be concerned about your daughter developing her chewing/swallowing skills and has this in the forefront of her mind when making her recommendation.

My personal view? I would stick with feeding on demand while ensuring my little one has lots of exposure to oral motor stimulation. If you need ideas for that...just ask your OT she should be able to recommend lots! Eating solids is not the only way to achieve this. I delayed solids for all my children and EBF until they were 8-9 months before starting any solids at all.
post #26 of 28
I too, am a pediatric OT who also does feeding and ebf my own child. I completely agree with the previous OT's post. I'd also like to add if once you speak to your OT and she still doesnt honor your request, and if you dont feel comfortable with her, you can always switch to another therapist, whether you are in early intervention or privately seeing her.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichelleZB View Post

It's not "feedings". It's sort of a lifestyle.

 

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post #28 of 28
I would say, if you're really concerned, talk to your pediatrician. But as for my opinion- your baby needs to ear. She doesn't sound ready for strictly solid/ pured food. Maybe instead of every 3 hours tho, feed on demand? I dunno, I've heard that's better n it works with my 3mo (full term baby)
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