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Problem with TV watching

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hello, 

 

I think my brain is fried so I haven't been able to come up with a solution.

My 5 year old has mild autism, so his speech is around 2.5 to 3 years old.

 

He likes physical play; chase, tickle, restle, play ball.

 

When we are out and about, it is fine, he is not watching cartoons (unless we go to the bank, he is allowed to watch on the iPad while I do what I need to do)

 

But when we are at home he gravitates to watching DVDs on the TV (I don't have cable, by choice) or watch cartoon on the iPad. Unless I am willing to chase him or tickle him.

 

He lately doenst want to playdoh or blocks/ He has never been into crafts. he dislikes board games or workbooks, coloring will not last more than 5 minutes, same with reading.

He refuses to help me cook or anything else. It is either run or TV

 

My problem is that i cannot physically chase him all the time we are home so he stays out of the iPad or TV.

 

Any ideas?, I am beyond  tired and feeling I cannot let him watch so many cartoons

post #2 of 4
I have an almost 2-year-old & occasionally we get into a TV watching rut. Its so easy to put on PBS or Dora so that I can check my email or prep dinner. Sometimes it gets to be too much and if the TV is off she asks for it to be on. I find music to be helpful as an alternative to TV. I put on a toddler-friendly Pandora station by searching 'silly songs' or 'toddler singalongs'. We can dance or I pull out her music box (maracas, shakers, a little drum).

Another way I try to start independent tv-free play is by pulling out 2 different sets of toys, like megablocks and her little people princesses. I dump both out in the middle of the floor & encourage her to play. Sometimes she picks one or the other to play with and sometimes she'll incorporate both into her play. Balls, stuffed animals, dolls, music toys...any combo tends to work. She'll find a forgotten/neglectes toy and play for a while.

If there is a favorite cartoon or character he likes, offer/encourage a TV-free alternative. He wants Mickey? Pull out the Mickey puzzle/book/figure/coloringbook & put on some Disney tunes.

Make the most of the TV time you do allow. Use it to allow yourself to shower, make dinner or any other important task that need your full attention.
post #3 of 4

Wow New Mom, I could have written your post.  Our DS (4.5) is MASSIVELY active, and, although he can play on his own, it is rare and he almost always prefers that I am playing with him.  Which means that the only down time I really get is when the TV or iPad is on. 

 

I'm at a loss what to do.  Most days I make sure we have at least 2 activities/outings planned which makes it easy to keep him off the TV. But of course it isn't possible to always have big outing planned every single day.  When we stay home, some days I am full of energy and can get him out in the yard or playing something, but other days I am wiped out and find myself letting him watch 2-3 hours which then of course makes me feel like a terrible mom. 

 

I look forward to hearing thoughts from others!

post #4 of 4

We're just the same here. My 6 six year daughter has moderate autism, and LOVES to watch DVD or shows on the iPad. 

 

She doesn't like to be read to, puzzles, most toys, coloring books are just laughable at my house (The crayons usually get eaten if I'm not watching like a hawk), same with crafts. 

 

I can't find a way to get much done AND also a way to limit her TV watching. She's so all over the place, getting into everything. And I mean EVERYTHING. All the hands, and curiousity of a toddler, but with the climbing abilites and strength of an older child. 

 

Anyway, I'm sorry I don't have any solutions, but it's nice to hear I'm not alone. *hugs to you all*

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