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What's your breastfeeding age limit? - Page 3

post #41 of 82

My son is still nursing at 37 months. I like to get my direction from the Bible, and my personal limit is when he is able to reliably "minister", and relay accurately a rather complex message, like Samuel apparently was able to do when he was weaned and sent to the temple to serve (See 1 Sam. 3), possibly 4-6 years of age.

post #42 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazurii View Post

I weaned both my children at the same time.  My son was just over five years old and my daughter was almost three.  I weaned them because my nursing aversion had hit its peak and was severely affecting our relationships.  I start getting the "nails on chalkboard" when they're around 18 months old.

If I were nursing just one child at a time I think my limit would be much higher, probably around 7 years old.  We're planning on having one more, so I guess I'll let you know if we make it that long.
post #43 of 82
Please explain what nursing aversion symptoms are as I think this is what I'm going through now I'm pregnant with my third and still nursing my 14 month old.
Thanks
post #44 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelmumma30 View Post

Please explain what nursing aversion symptoms are as I think this is what I'm going through now I'm pregnant with my third and still nursing my 14 month old.
Thanks

 

For me it feels like anxiety.  Heart pounding, wanting to jump out of my skin, almost screaming.  I want to hit my kids or slap them away from my breast.  Wanting to do anything but nurse.

post #45 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelmumma30 View Post

Please explain what nursing aversion symptoms are as I think this is what I'm going through now I'm pregnant with my third and still nursing my 14 month old.
Thanks

I had a physical aversion to nursing when I was pregnant, and I weaned my daughter completely until after my new baby was born (though she started nursing again after the birth - we tandemed for a while).

As my milk dried up during pregnancy, breastfeeding became so uncomfortable it was painful. Not like a "real" pain, more like upset nerves. It was like being tickled so much it "hurts", or like when you sit on your foot and it falls asleep. I got to where any contact with my nipples was so overstimulating, I would try to nurse her and find myself gritting my teeth and curling my toes just to put up with the sensation. I had to wean her, at least until the birth.
post #46 of 82
Each day they are just one day older and the change day by day is so gradual. I couldn't imagine stopping now. My daughter is 3.5. If you had asked me when she was a baby I couldn't have imagined still doing this now. But could I tell her we had to stop? No.
post #47 of 82

My personal age limit is 3, maybe 3 1/2.


My son self-weaned at 2 1/2, which was perfect for both of us. 

 

I think it depends on whether or not both mother and child are happy with the breastfeeding relationship.  My son was very calm and looked like a stoner baby every time he nursed.  It was cute as  heck and he was very attached to me. 

 

My daughter flails like a crazy person (she is now 7 months old), will climb on top of me to nurse, but will also get distracted easily or shove her thumb in her mouth while nursing.  OW.  I'm also having a bit of a hormonal reaction to her eating solid foods now and me nursing less.  I guess I'm getting PMS back.  Oh dear.  orngbiggrin.gif

 

It's a very different experience from child to child, and I imagine my daughter will either self-wean sooner than my son... or be very possessive of me for a longer period of time.  Haven't quite sorted that out yet. 

 

Anyway, I think if it's become unpleasant, there's nothing wrong with you weaning and letting it end sooner, rather than later. Yes, we want to do what's best for our children, but I also think part of parenting is doing what's best for all people involved.

post #48 of 82

I don't know yet. I've been thinking lately than when my 2.5 year old turns 3, I will be done. But his birthday is in february, and if he's still nursing then I might want to keep going until spring and warmer weather if he wants too as well.

We'll see when we get there.

He mostly nurses morning and bedtime only, but if he's very tired or sick he'll ask more.

I did experience a sudden, extreme aversion against night time nursing when he was 2. I was suddenly just DONE. One night when he was nursing I just felt it, that I could never, ever do that again with him. And I told him the next day, and the night after he and I was up for a couple of hours because he wanted to nurse and I said no. I carried him around and sang, we cuddled in bed and so on. The night after he woke up and asked, I said no, and he fell back asleep. And that was that.

post #49 of 82

I don't really have a "limit" but as a lactation consultant, I know the face elongates and juts out at about three that's why you often see toothmarks while nursing a child like this, the previous flat baby-face of the child is changing as is the palate shape. But, I've nursed for 1.5 years, 2+ years and my last baby for 4.5 years.

 

I never nursed while pregnant, but I know a lot of women get the "skin crawling" feeling while nursing during pregnancy.

 

I don't have an upper limit, but as the worldwide average of weaning is a little over four years (some kids wean sooner than this, some wean later) my limit is when my child no longer needs it.

 

A lot of moms try "limited nursing" when they feel that "skin crawling" feeling. Letting the child know they can nurse, but only for a set short time (this only works with children who are old enough to understand the passage of time and understand that other people feel pain) works for many moms. Also, "dry nursing" holding a child close to the body without actually breastfeeding them can be substituted for older toddlers whom you are not comfortable nursing for long periods of time.

post #50 of 82
wow, interesting. i had no idea that this was a phenomenon. sure, i've heard plenty of body-shame peeps turn up their noses at any hint of actually being mammalian. the type who call a lot of natural, normal things "gross". but now i know that there's this other phenomenon that can happen in the very-happy-to-breastfeed type, as well. i guess it makes sense that nature eventually starts giving us some little, "ok, maybe it's time to move past this phase" signals, which is totally different from that tired old "euww, if they can talk, they're too old" attitude. i learn so much cool stuff from you lot! orngbiggrin.gif
post #51 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by filamentary View Post

wow, interesting. i had no idea that this was a phenomenon. sure, i've heard plenty of body-shame peeps turn up their noses at any hint of actually being mammalian. the type who call a lot of natural, normal things "gross". but now i know that there's this other phenomenon that can happen in the very-happy-to-breastfeed type, as well. i guess it makes sense that nature eventually starts giving us some little, "ok, maybe it's time to move past this phase" signals, which is totally different from that tired old "euww, if they can talk, they're too old" attitude. i learn so much cool stuff from you lot! orngbiggrin.gif

Thank you, glad to help.

 

I hear the "skin crawl-ey" thing a lot as it's is very common in pregnant women and in breastfeeding moms as children get older than say, 3, give or take or only with the older child with tandem nursing in some women. In some cases, it's probably hormonal. Being pregnant and nursing works well for some, not so well for others. I have had a lot of clients and LLL moms tell me almost secretly, because most are "happy to breastfeed" types :) that their "skin just crawls when the child tries to nurse." As long as things look healthy in all other arenas, it's like you said, kind of a "time to move on" signal. If it happens during pregnancy or with a 3 year old, it's often seen as a signal that things are ready to change, if it happens with a newborn.... something else is going on.

 

On a related note, a lot of women get that same skin crawl-ey feeling when their partners want to engage in previously enjoyed breast play during sex play. Again, it may be partly hormonal and/or the woman is seeing herself differently than before. Happily most of these women do go back to enjoying breast play during love making after their children are weaned. In some it may take months or longer.  In some cases, many women have no problem with breast play. Every woman is different.

 

(My DH always says "You're a wealth of worthless knowledge, Maggie." :rotflmaoYeah, but I can kick his (and most every body elses) sorry butt at Trivial Pursuit like no one else. Other people just think I'm annoying.) 

post #52 of 82
We were gently weaning my first around his 2nd birthday. It was something I started to dislike because we got stuck at 2 a day and weaning stopped being "gentle". So I decided I was comfortable with nap and bed time and we would wean a little later. I found out i was pregnant a few weeks later and between the aversion and the pregnancy he completely weaned around 27 months. Some days I think i can nurse DD to three but other times when I'm around my sister and her still nursing 33 month old I start to think 2.5 might be my limit.
post #53 of 82

When I started nursing I thought 3 would be my limit. But I nursed baby #2 till 3 1/2 and "baby" number 3 till ??? She was 5 in June and is still nursing. That being said I too went thought the hormonal thought I was going to rip my hair out stage as well. I would have quit if it was up to just me but I have kids who need to nurse very bad and  although I have tried weaning doesn't happen. Honestly I had her and I all ready to wean for her 5th Birthday and while she laid in bed next to me and quietly sobbed it just felt so wrong! It was not our time to be done. She asks to nurse often but I generally only let her at bedtime and in the night. Yea she wakes still to nurse generally twice a night but if I fight it I (and my husband) gets too little sleep. 

 

Anywho long answer but there ya have it. : )

post #54 of 82
Not sure, I have not been tested. My GOAL has always been to nurse til 2 years, but each time I've had the child self wean due to pregnancy around 19-22 months old. I'm due with our last baby maybe she'll be the one to make it til 2! I think three would be my personal limit.
post #55 of 82

I believe in self weaning. I dont have a limit in mind. Ds1 stopped nursing just before his 5th birthday, and ds2 at about 3 1/2

post #56 of 82

I continued nursing both babies alot well into their 2's, but pregnancy  reduced my supply, so that by 3, ds1 wasnt nursing very often. Ds2 wasnt nursing much at 3 either, but certainly frequently enough. My third baby, dd, is 21mths and still nurses alot. I cant imagine not doing that, she is still  a baby to me. I nursed all of my kids alot at this age.

 

I cant  even begin to imagine weaning at 18mths,...that seems very young....

post #57 of 82

The enzyme lactase that is needed to break down breastmilk or any milk gradually decreases after infancy to only about 10% of the original amount by ages 5-7. Some people retain a little more and some a little less which is part of what determines if someone is "lactose intolerant" or not. So, breastfeeding (or any milk intake) should be very little or none by ages 5-7 which sounds pretty old in our culture, but not in the rest of the world. A good article on lactase enzyme http://jn.nutrition.org/content/127/7/1382.full

post #58 of 82

Breastmilk comes with  its own lactase and probiotics that make  its nutrients, lactose included, bioavailable. That is one of the main reasons it is superior to formula or cows milk. It doesnt matter whether or not the child is 5-7yrs or 5-7mths, the moms milk doesnt suddenly not have anymore lactase.

 

The same is true for raw cows milk, which is why it is superior to pasteurized cows milk.

 

Your post reminds  me of a nurse who advised me not to nurse my toddler who had a stomach bug. She said 'dairy is hard for him to digest.'

 

Not so lady, its made easy to digest, because it contains lactase. Not to mention the probiotics and antibodies in there that  wipe out the bug  in no time. (usually less that 36hours for any of my kids)

post #59 of 82

My first four children weaned themselves by the time they were ten months old, which made me sad. My fifth breastfed until she was two weeks away from her second birthday. At that point it was only three times a day anyway, upon waking in the morning, at naptime, and at bedtime. I don't know what my upper limit would have been, as I wouldn't have had a problem with nursing her longer. But I think three would have been it.

post #60 of 82
I'm breastfeeding my 21month son. I will like to stop at 2 but it looks like there is no end! I don't mind much him self weaning or going a little after 2 but I get no support from my husband or family. Everyone say he's too old to breastfeed and make negative comments. My husband just feels it's time to stop but I don't mind and my son don't want to stop! I could really use some support here!

OAN: please tell me what these abbreviations I'm seeing on all these posts mean. Ex. DS, DD...all of them I'm completely lost,lol!
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