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What did you learn about birth that you wish someone had told you? - Page 7

post #121 of 132
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Originally Posted by lovebeingamomma View Post


I've never heard of this...are their studies showing this to be true?  Which medications?  I'm very anti-drug (in general), so I'm not shocked, but would love to see some studies. 

This bit of information is not about medication, however, it does have an interesting discussion as to how fluids (IV), during labor, influence a skewed weight loss in the newborn resulting in supplementation.   http://www.drjen4kids.com/soap%20box/newbornweight.htm

 

This is a great read by Dr. Sarah J. Buckley.  It is my conclusion, when any type of substance is entering mom's blood vein, the substance dilutes the healthy function of hormones including, but not limited to prolactin.  Prolactin makes breast milk.  http://www.bellybelly.com.au/birth/ecstatic-birth-natures-hormonal-blueprint-for-labor#.UggM65LrzAY

post #122 of 132

How difficult pushing can be. I hear so much in the natural birth world that pushing is a relief. I never felt the urge to push. Also, pee during labor, because you're extremely full bladder can get in the way of pushing. I also didn't have the urge to pee. 

post #123 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaydove View Post

How difficult pushing can be. I hear so much in the natural birth world that pushing is a relief. I never felt the urge to push. Also, pee during labor, because you're extremely full bladder can get in the way of pushing. I also didn't have the urge to pee. 

 

If it makes you feel any better, my first labor was completely like this - never got the urge to push, pushed for hours and hours, and it was hell.  I figured all my births would be like this and that I was just really wimpy.  Second labor, uncontrollable pushing urge, baby out in half an hour, and I wouldn't say it was exactly a relief but pushing felt better than not pushing.  Both my babies were posterior but my first had a nuchal hand, which really contributed to the "it was hell" feeling.  Basically... if it feels really hard, it's because it is hard.

post #124 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyKay View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by typebug View Post

As a first time mom I felt like I was really disconnected from my unborn baby all the time. I really didn't have the capacity to fathom what was really in there. I felt guilty about not feeling that connection my yoga instructors would go on and on about. Maybe it'll be there next time around after having been through the whole experience. It would have been cool if someone had said "if you don't feel all magical and blissed out, that's normal." 

 

I really wish someone would gather all the normal reactions women have to their babies after and document them for all moms-to-be. I have two friends who felt like this and now I make a point of telling first time pregnant moms that it could happen and it is absolutely normal.

 

I had a different weird reaction. It took me a while to see my daughter as a separate human. For the first few weeks I felt weird referring to her by her name and kept calling her "baby girl" until my best-friend asked me "why are you not using her name".

 

I felt like a terrible person for not talking, singing, reading, etc., to my unborn baby. Generally all I ever said to him was, "Please quit kicking mama!" But I just never really felt the urge to talk to him.

 

I also had the hardest time calling my baby by his name, and I'm glad I'm not the only one! I don't think it was really about seeing him as a separate person, it just seemed weird that I had the power to assign a name to another human being! We picked his name out long before he was even conceived, but I thought I would "know" when I saw him that it was the right name. And I didn't. I called him lots of things, mostly "Baby Bird" (because that's what he looked like when hungry!) for a good 2-3 months before slowly transitioning to referring to him by name. I think it was kind of like getting used to saying, "my husband" after I got married - it just seemed so strange and bold to make that sort of assertion. Anyway, I do call him by his name (or a shortened form of it) most of the time now. I'm glad I'm not the only one!

post #125 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyscience View Post

 

I felt like a terrible person for not talking, singing, reading, etc., to my unborn baby. Generally all I ever said to him was, "Please quit kicking mama!" But I just never really felt the urge to talk to him.

 

I also had the hardest time calling my baby by his name, and I'm glad I'm not the only one! I don't think it was really about seeing him as a separate person, it just seemed weird that I had the power to assign a name to another human being! We picked his name out long before he was even conceived, but I thought I would "know" when I saw him that it was the right name. And I didn't. I called him lots of things, mostly "Baby Bird" (because that's what he looked like when hungry!) for a good 2-3 months before slowly transitioning to referring to him by name. I think it was kind of like getting used to saying, "my husband" after I got married - it just seemed so strange and bold to make that sort of assertion. Anyway, I do call him by his name (or a shortened form of it) most of the time now. I'm glad I'm not the only one!

I also had a hard time communicating with my baby before she was born...it always felt really forced and awkward when I tried to talk or sing to her, except for a few occasions.

 

Calling her by name was strange at first also.

post #126 of 132

how much i bleed after my dd was born 12 weeks was away more then i thought you should but the ob said some women can bleed up to 16 weeks after baby is born

post #127 of 132

I know this is about birth, but bfing is directly connected.  1. It is normal that you pump nothing after birth!  Colostrum is enough for your baby, there's nothing wrong with you or your breasts, and your baby won't perish.  2.  YOU MAKE ENOUGH MILK. 3. If your baby's diaper output isn't up to par, feed your baby more often!   4.  Babies need to eat 10+ times a day after birth.  You will feel that your child is attached to your breast for weeks.  5.  Your baby has early hunger cues, and they are... 6. Formula will not solve your problems, but will only make them worse.  Feed your baby more often.

post #128 of 132

not about birth, but: that sometimes babies go on "poop strikes", and it's okay! Some babies don't pee or poo lots of small amounts, they do one or two BIG dumps/pees, every baby is different, get used to your baby's schedule, and someone will always tell you what you're doing is wrong. 

post #129 of 132

someone has mentioned colace already, right?  if you are afraid of postpartum pooping or if you are getting stopped up, TAKE THE COLACE, lol, and drink lots of water, your butt will thank you. 

post #130 of 132

Sorry if this has already been repeated but some women prefer warm compresses over ice. I didn't find that out until my second birth - so much better for me! 

post #131 of 132

Thought of another thing today - you can have back labor even if your baby isn't posterior. I heard a ton about back labor with posterior babies, but didn't worry too much because my baby was well-positioned. Only after he was born (100% back labor!) did my mom tell me that she had back labor with ALL FIVE BABIES. Not all of which were posterior. orngtongue.gif

post #132 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclamen View Post

someone has mentioned colace already, right?  if you are afraid of postpartum pooping or if you are getting stopped up, TAKE THE COLACE, lol, and drink lots of water, your butt will thank you. 

Colace was my best friend.

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