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my 8 1/2 year old isnot reading - Page 2

post #21 of 27

Thanks for this post.  I also have an almost 8 year-old who is not reading.

post #22 of 27
I just wanted to say that I think it's really sad that your dh is not more supportive of hs. Perhaps he needs to learn more about it so he can support you more. I was the skeptical one when we started hs. Now I see my kids excited about what they learn everyday. (I should add that my dh is teacher and I am the one who works.)
post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 

I think its really sad that dh isn't more supportive too.  I LOVE the lifestyle...I know exactly what my kids are learning, I get to go on all the cool field trips :)  (and we can go during the week off peak after school kids leave hours) ...  and it just makes life fun! (not that its not hard).  I tend to be unschool-y though, and not a lot of what we do LOOKS like school, and thats just not our style.  Which is unfortunate, because thats what I think we'd need to do to get dh's buy in (MAYBE).  Well, that and the house is ALWAYS a mess and dh can't handle that either... (reasoning: if kids were in school, all the school mess would stay in school thereby keeping our house that much cleaner from the get go...) 

 

(We did end up hs'ing again this year with the understanding that ds definitely goes next year.  sigh.  but, i'll take it.  And, his reading has really started coming along... he's not reading chapter books by himself yet, but he's reading a magic treehouse book to me and understanding what he's reading - but its still word.pause.word.pause type reading...  He just won't read it by himself.  I'm not sure what the problem there is... but I think its more of a behaviour thing than a reading thing at this point.  I know he's said that he doesn't want me to STOP reading to him...  and I won't... but I suspect he's a closet reader and just won't admit it for some reason (he sometimes gets really strange ideas, and he's a stubborn beast, so...  as long as he's reading I really don't care if he admits it or not...)

 

PS  a few great reading practice ideas for reluctant readers...

-set them up with email accounts.  Emails to and from grandma and fave aunt are GREAT motivators

-Make mailboxes to send letters to house hold members

-Pass notes to dh with "shh, don't tell the kids" kind of conversations, then leave notes lying around  (its amazing how quickly those are read -- and those are read in cooperation with his brothers.  sneaky and manipulative, yes. Adorable, yes.  :)  I deliberately use big words I know they can sound out with effort.

-Give them a recipe for a treat and tell them if they can make it, they can eat it.  Another great cooperative effort. :)

post #24 of 27
Nope, my 8 yo isn't reading either! Sorry, no suggestions! She's absolutely capable, no learning issues, her spelling and writing skills seem to be at grade level. She just isn't motivated to put the time into reading practice and is habitually defiant and argumentative.
post #25 of 27

You are right to be concerned that your eight year old is finding it difficult to learn to read. I am a retired teacher (Australian) and I would pull out all the stops for any seven/eight  year old not yet reading . By eight, children are expected to have some reading ability in order to function in class  and the amount of time spent teaching  reading is reduced. In addition, their self esteem suffers and they can start behaving badly to deflect attention. In this area, your son is fortunate as he is being taught at home so he cannot compare himself to others.

 

Get his vision and his hearing checked out. It does sound like dyslexia which is an umbrella term for all kinds of problems relating to reading and comprehending text. It affects 10% of people. It was thought that dyslexia had to do with vision but in reality it is a problem in hearing the sounds and associating them with the text. It would be about this age that your child would be tested for dyslexia at school , You have done nothing  wrong. It is often hereditary. Did either you or your husband experience difficulty learning to read? I would suggest you go to the Australian site SPELD where you can learn more about it and decide whether it sounds like the problems your son is experiencing. The South Australian speld  has a free on line course for parents wanting to help their children. It is very good and easy to follow. Please. please read it.

 

If you are thinking of sending your child back to school, talk to the school's guidance officer to ensure that your son will be tested and given the help he needs. In the meantime, Dr Seuss books are great because they have a lot of rhyming words which are important to train your son to hear the sounds. Ask him to find more words that rhyme. Can he hear the odd one out if you call out three words, two of which rhyme and one that does not? Keep reading to him and make it fun. If he can see that reading is fun as well as important, it will help him. One thing to remember is that struggling to read is very tiring and any reading should be done in the morning when your son is fresher and in many small doses.

 

Best wishes on your journey. Do pm me if I can help you further.

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrannyH View Post
 

By eight, children are expected to have some reading ability in order to function in class  and the amount of time spent teaching  reading is reduced. In addition, their self esteem suffers and they can start behaving badly to deflect attention. In this area, your son is fortunate as he is being taught at home so he cannot compare himself to others.

 

Granny, there's a lot more about home learning that's fortunate here. It's not just the lack of damage to self-esteem. There's also the fact that evaluation does not have to take place through written work. Nor is learning increasingly expected to be done through text. At home there is no expectation that a child already be reading easily. Nor is reading instruction granted less time as a child gets beyond his 8th birthday. None of the things you're concerned about apply in a home-learning environment.

 

I'd encourage you to think outside the box a little on this one. Imagine a child like some I've known, who for whatever reason isn't ready or able or interested to learn to read until she is 9 and a half. As an 8-year-old at home she learns by listening, experiencing, questioning, experimenting, through project work, by being involved in daily life, by participating in sports, arts and handicrafts at very advanced levels. She is involved in her community, she gardens, cares for animals, weaves complex four-harness loom patterns, plays violin and piano and sings in a choir, is intimately familiar with Greek and Norse mythology, can discuss local and national politics, is an avid environmentalist. A few months before her 10th birthday she begins reading and is fluent at or beyond grade level within a few weeks. Her education is not impoverished in the slightest by her later reading. 

 

Obviously it behooves the OP to ensure that there are no learning disabilities or perceptual obstacles in the way of her child's learning to read. But as an outsider posting in the Homeschooling forum, it is important when giving advice for you to first examine your assumptions about what is correct and necessary and expected. Conventional western schools are built around an expectation of literacy by 8, such that it is very difficult to continue to support and adequately teach children who do not attain that benchmark. That is absolutely not the case with home-based learning.

 

Miranda

post #27 of 27
just wanted to share my experience. Two lateish readers. My ten year old now chooses reading as his first choice activity a lot of the time. My eight year also loves reading. Neither started before age 8 really-my now 8 year old could read but didn't. My 10 year old had and still has quite obvious dyslexia style issues and eventually I did give him some specific help. The point is you would never pick either out nowadays as a late reader. And it really has not slowed them down elsewhere. Its just totally different in a home setting. Late reading does not create an issue at all. Tbh them being able to read makes remarkably little difference except that they have an especially portable interest!

My experience of dyslexia and my kid was that it was obvious. It manifested in how he read out loud. Helped that he had pretty much every soft marker for dyslexia-he was even ambidextrous til around age 6. Dyslexia is not the same as late reading in a homeschool context as the two environments are si different.
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