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Children's books that you just don't like - Page 5

post #81 of 140
Other books I love - Frog and Toad. <3
post #82 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbvr View Post

....I also dislike the controlling tone of "The Runaway Bunny" Margaret Wise Brown

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by earthmama4 View Post

 

I agree, I am not a huge fan of Run Away Bunny. Its kind of a stalker mom without boundaries book at first glance. But if you consider the target audience (preschoolers) its more likely that age is testing the boundaries of their parents love, not truly trying to become emancipated. Kind of like "Mama, Do You Love Me?" with the girl asking if her mama will still love her if she does this or becomes that and the answer is always yes.

 

 

I slipped Runaway Bunny into the giveaway pile shortly after reading it for the first time, but an early childhood educator friend of mine said that the stalker mom is not creepy, but reassuring to young children.

 

The text and illustrations of the Richard Scarry books drive me nuts, but my DD loves them, and knows all kind of weird details about building roads and houses from those stories.  Same with Magic School Bus, her current addiction.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post

Other books I love - Frog and Toad. <3

 

LOVE Frog and Toad, and most things by Mo Willems, especially Elephant and Piggie.  (The first time we read Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus, we read the first page and DD said yes to the Pigeon.)

post #83 of 140

I hate "Love You Forever" but after reading this thread, I've made a mental note to buy it for my son when he's older, just to screw with his future spouse's head.

post #84 of 140

I don't like:

Berenstein Bears

Clifford

Little Critters

Caillou

Robert Munsch books illustrated by Michael Martchenko

 

I think a lot of these have a negative aspect that the characters overcome, but I don't like the way the negative aspect is introduced.

 

I love this thread!

post #85 of 140

Not a particular book, book 2 general things I'm hating lately:

 

1.  We have about 8,000 different kids books by different authors with exactly the same stupid story where each page features a different animal saying the same thing (i.e. The Very Busy Spider, Little Mouse's Big Secret).  I am so sick of that storyline.

 

2. It seems like a lot of authors write a charming hit story and then follow it up with a bunch of books that are essentially the same, like Little Pea/Little Hoot/Spoon.  I kind of liked the original Pinkalicious story until I realized there were a billion more books like that.

 

I don't see as many books as problematic due to their messages as many here.  I think sometimes the book is for the child to live vicariously, or recognize him/herself in the character rather than learn a lesson.  I think the Little Critter books, in particular, are good for this.  They really resonate with my daughter. 

 

Anyone else agree, though, that 95% of the "I Can Read" books with the level numbers are absolutely awful???  I mean, I know they have to be simply written, but, ugh. 
 

post #86 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by newmamalizzy View Post

Anyone else agree, though, that 95% of the "I Can Read" books with the level numbers are absolutely awful???  I mean, I know they have to be simply written, but, ugh. 
 

Yes!!  I HATED those books. First, they were just boring and the art was terrible and then to add insult to injury my DC was a struggling reader with high comprehension so she had to suffer through these for YEARS.  Poor thing. 

post #87 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post

Other books I love - Frog and Toad. <3

 

We all love them too, we have some of them from when DH was a kid.  But we also have "Owl at Home" by Lobel.  Can anybody explain to me the tear-water tea story?  I scratch my head at it every time we read it.

 

Someone mentioned hating reading all the little bubbles in the Magic School Bus books - I had the exact same thought when we brought some home from the library.  I never know which order to read them in and they suck the flow right out of the story.

 

Shel Silverstein's poetry books were a favorite too from very early on - some of the themes and even words were a bit sketchy for my son, but he so loved the odd drawings and the broad range of subject matter that I just couldn't say no.  ;)

 

This thread is just reminding me that I was meaning to clean out my son's bookshelf...

post #88 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by GISDiva View Post

 

Someone mentioned hating reading all the little bubbles in the Magic School Bus books - I had the exact same thought when we brought some home from the library.  I never know which order to read them in and they suck the flow right out of the story.

 

We love these books as well.  I always make an agreement with my girls about what exactly we are reading.  If we don't have much time, we just read the text.  More time, we read the bubbles and text.  Infinite time (or don't care if we finish) text, bubbles and "reports".  Now they are older and reading, I can read the text, they can read the bubbles.

post #89 of 140

I really don't like The Mineosaur. We got it through the Imagination Library and it was supposed to teach our child about sharing, but ended up helping to teach the phrase "mine mine mine!" Not the book's fault, but I definitely hide it ;)

post #90 of 140

I can't stand Hansel & Gretel.  Two parents trying repeatedly to loose their children in the woods.  How awful! Then the two kids having to push a mean lady into a fire in order to survive.  Abandonment and burning of people.  Great book.

post #91 of 140
Golden books. There may be some gems in there somewhere but the ones we've been given have almost all been boring or horrible Disney nonsense. The worst is "Cheer up, Eeyore!" Gahhhh! Why bother when you can break out the real Winnie the Pooh.

The new Berenstein Bears caught me by surprise, they have a strong religious agenda now. Some actually quote Bible verses and "listen to the Bible" becomes the lesson of the day, rather than learning through experience. That series was always a bit too wholesome and preachy, but they were a bit helpful for kids going through new experiences like starting school, new baby, etc. However the newer editions are either LITERALLY preaching, or else rehashes of old stories with far worse art!

What else drives me crazy... Obviously "noisy books" and marketing books... And yes you do have to be careful with classics and fairy tales as they can be disrespectful to kids or plain scary, but I'd still break them out eventually when the kids can absorb the culture but have a reasonable conversation about any troublesome messages.

I hid our Junie B. Jones book. Kids learn spelling from reading, I don't want to confuse her yet!

Rainbow Magic. This inane series about various themes of fairies (colors, flowers, sports, pets etc.) always comes in "collect em all" sets of seven, and the plot is the SAME in every darn book! Jack Frost's goblins stole the seven fairies' magic thingies that fuel their fairy ability, and the two grade-school girl heroines must help get them back. I figured at least they had my daughter devouring a ton of books, but the tide turned for me when I learned that the Soccer Fairy doesn't actually play soccer in the book! She just worries about getting her magic token back so soccer can be fun for everyone again. So, she's essentially a cheerleader?

I suppose I'll still let her get Rainbow Magic at the library, I know forbiding things just extends the fascination (I was forbidden video games even as a high schooler, so just jumped ship and played them to my GPA's detriment at friends' houses. This bored my friends who were "over it"). However I will try to screen the next series more carefully...
post #92 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by myra1 View Post

God Gave Us You....I have no problem with Christian books, but a bear with an OB, Doppler, hospital birth, and bottle feeding? If anyone can UC and breastfeed, its a durn bear!

The Backyardigans are intolerable.

That and nearly every question little cub asked was answered with a non thinking reply. We spent a lot of time discussing every page since DS asked if male bears had sperms to give their special friends like humans do. smile.gif

At least books like that provide loads of communication before being Good willed.
post #93 of 140

I agree about Giving Tree and Love You Forever.  

 

When my kids were babies, I modified the end of Three Little Pigs, which some book renditions have the wolf burning up in the fire or pot of hot water.  Same with Hansel & Gretel.  No need to introduce them to such great tragedy at such an early age.  They'll have a lifetime of seeing and experiencing it.  

 

Lastly, I have only thrown 2 books in my life in the trash, one of which was a children's book about a girl who had a pug and in the end, she burned up in the house.  I think it was a Matilda book.  It was horrible.  

post #94 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mummoth View Post

I hate "Love You Forever" but after reading this thread, I've made a mental note to buy it for my son when he's older, just to screw with his future spouse's head.

Brilliant!  I may do the same.  Maybe someone else suggested the same a few decades ago (pre-internet, in some off-line mothering group), because I too got it from my MIL (who is unlike the mother in the book, fortunately).  I think I am the fourth person on this list to have gotten this from her MIL!  Also find it a bizar book.

post #95 of 140
Thread Starter 
I see a lot of people mentioning it and it felt weird to me too, but my younger daughter loves it. She always asks if I'll still be her mom when she grows up, and obviously I won't have that specific relationship with her as in the book, but she doesn't understand how relationships change as you get older. She just knows she still wants me to be her mom when she's an adult.
post #96 of 140

At first glance, An Awesome Book by Dallas Clayton was interesting. It's about having big, fantastic dreams. Which is okay in theory, but he berates having dreams about practical things. While I'm all for kids using their imaginations to the fullest, the book just rubbed me the wrong way. He criticized dreams of useful items like automobiles and encouraged "rocket powered unicorns". I believe we should encourage our children to dream of ways to make our "practical" items better, or more fantastic. He encourages them to entertain themselves with their imaginations, rather. Why not dream of ways to improve transportation, or medicine, ect... Which are very practical. 

 

To top it all off his photo of himself at the end was absurd. Like a scene kids myspace photo. Think early 2005.

post #97 of 140

The Giving Tree is about the selfless act of giving without expectation. It teaches that you can keep your own vibration high by always exemplifying unconditional love, regardless of the other person's behavior. My kids and I have had many in depth discussions about this book and lots of profound stuff comes up for them. I think it's brilliant!
 

post #98 of 140

I hate most of the Little Critter books as well.  The first one I read was about a child getting angry who decides to run away.  Ummm... not the ideas I want to put into my toddler's brain!

 

I also can't stand The Giving Tree, and I am so glad there are others out there who feel the same way.  I think it has a strong message about protecting nature as well as good messages about boundaries and stewardship, but it's just not a book I want to cuddle up with little ones and read.  Maybe when they are older I'll like it to discuss those issues, but as a story for little kids... not for me.

 

Finally, I can't stand Green Eggs and Ham.  It is absolutely obnoxious.  But the look of pride on a little one's face when they can read the whole book does make it worth it.

 

Oh, I also hate lift the flap books.  I know they are necessary and we have quite a few for my infant, but they just drive me crazy.

 

Hmmm.  I'm sure there are more.  We have a huge, huge collection of children's books, so while I have dozens upon dozens that I love, some make my skin crawl.

post #99 of 140

I am with you on the newer Golden Books.  They are ridiculous.  I bought an Alice in Wonderland one, and the plot was ridiculous.  Alice got big.  Then she got small.  Then she got big.  I must say that some of the older ones are good though.  I have a collection of some older ones and they are cute.  They are hard to find though.

 

My daughter just started liking the Rainbow Magic books.  These remind me of the Babysitter's Club books that I read as a child.  She's not going to get a soaring vocabulary from them, but if they teach her to be passionate about reading, they will have done their job.  I credit BSC with my love of reading.  Luckily though, she reads them to herself, so I don't have to deal with them :-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by moonjunio View Post

Golden books. There may be some gems in there somewhere but the ones we've been given have almost all been boring or horrible Disney nonsense. The worst is "Cheer up, Eeyore!" Gahhhh! Why bother when you can break out the real Winnie the Pooh.

The new Berenstein Bears caught me by surprise, they have a strong religious agenda now. Some actually quote Bible verses and "listen to the Bible" becomes the lesson of the day, rather than learning through experience. That series was always a bit too wholesome and preachy, but they were a bit helpful for kids going through new experiences like starting school, new baby, etc. However the newer editions are either LITERALLY preaching, or else rehashes of old stories with far worse art!

What else drives me crazy... Obviously "noisy books" and marketing books... And yes you do have to be careful with classics and fairy tales as they can be disrespectful to kids or plain scary, but I'd still break them out eventually when the kids can absorb the culture but have a reasonable conversation about any troublesome messages.

I hid our Junie B. Jones book. Kids learn spelling from reading, I don't want to confuse her yet!

Rainbow Magic. This inane series about various themes of fairies (colors, flowers, sports, pets etc.) always comes in "collect em all" sets of seven, and the plot is the SAME in every darn book! Jack Frost's goblins stole the seven fairies' magic thingies that fuel their fairy ability, and the two grade-school girl heroines must help get them back. I figured at least they had my daughter devouring a ton of books, but the tide turned for me when I learned that the Soccer Fairy doesn't actually play soccer in the book! She just worries about getting her magic token back so soccer can be fun for everyone again. So, she's essentially a cheerleader?

I suppose I'll still let her get Rainbow Magic at the library, I know forbiding things just extends the fascination (I was forbidden video games even as a high schooler, so just jumped ship and played them to my GPA's detriment at friends' houses. This bored my friends who were "over it"). However I will try to screen the next series more carefully...
post #100 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonjunio View Post

The new Berenstein Bears caught me by surprise, they have a strong religious agenda now. Some actually quote Bible verses and "listen to the Bible" becomes the lesson of the day, rather than learning through experience. That series was always a bit too wholesome and preachy, but they were a bit helpful for kids going through new experiences like starting school, new baby, etc. However the newer editions are either LITERALLY preaching, or else rehashes of old stories with far worse art!

Well, that's really too bad!  I will admit that I did find BB books useful when my 11 year old was young. I loved that they have those very specific conflict books that a parent could reach for to help a child deal with a problem. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by moonjunio View Post

What else drives me crazy... Obviously "noisy books" and marketing books... 

YES!!  We never had the Rainbow Fish book because it was suspicious to me from the start. Something about it seemed designed to market other products. I've gotten that vibe from other books too.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by moonjunio View Post

And yes you do have to be careful with classics and fairy tales as they can be disrespectful to kids or plain scary, but I'd still break them out eventually when the kids can absorb the culture but have a reasonable conversation about any troublesome messages.
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeslieintheKeys View Post

Same with Hansel & Gretel.  No need to introduce them to such great tragedy at such an early age.  They'll have a lifetime of seeing and experiencing it.  

I have a much different instinct about Fairy Tales. When my DC1 was young my gut told me that these stories, which were originally passed through story telling and then had a long life as books for our kids were good for kids. I read a few articles on fairy tales and the main point that resonated with me was that these stories were developed over time to address the real, typical worries of children and that bringing them up as a story helps children process and helps them feel less alone with these "Grimm" thoughts. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mommatodee View Post

The Giving Tree is about the selfless act of giving without expectation. It teaches that you can keep your own vibration high by always exemplifying unconditional love, regardless of the other person's behavior. My kids and I have had many in depth discussions about this book and lots of profound stuff comes up for them. I think it's brilliant!
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AmandaK View Post

I also can't stand The Giving Tree, and I am so glad there are others out there who feel the same way.  I think it has a strong message about protecting nature as well as good messages about boundaries and stewardship, but it's just not a book I want to cuddle up with little ones and read.  Maybe when they are older I'll like it to discuss those issues, but as a story for little kids... not for me.

 

One of the things I really DO like about The Giving Tree is the variety of ways people interpret this book!  Apparently some see it as a story about god, others nature, others human or mother/child relationships. To me it seems very much like it's about the relationship between two people and because of that it just kind of skeeves me out because that's not how I want "love" to look or feel to my kids. Not even a mother/child relationship.  BUT, I can see feeling like it's about love in profound way or about nature or about religion and having a much different feeling about the book. 

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