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What would you do?

Poll Results: You walk into a fast food establishment and your ten year old daughter points out that the woman serving you has the B word on her nametag, do you

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 4% (1)
    Say something to the employee right then and there
  • 30% (7)
    Say nothing but call and complain to a manager later
  • 52% (12)
    Say nothing, just talk to your child about it
  • 13% (3)
    something else
23 Total Votes  
post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Just curious what others would do


Edited by Anglyn - 8/11/13 at 10:51pm
post #2 of 15

I would confirm first. Some foreign name can be spelled in a way that can seem offensive to a an English speaker. and vice versa.
 

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

that's a good point

post #4 of 15

I wouldn't confront an employee.  I would call the manger and inform them. 


Twice I've called Jimmy John's to let them know their delivery guys use handicapped parking to make deliveries.  They were very nice and receptive.

post #5 of 15

I honestly don't think I'd care about that issue. Using a handicapped spot can negatively affect someone who really needs the spot, but calling oneself the b-word (if the employee was indeed doing that) doesn't really affect others. But then, both of my daughters are familiar with the b-word, and other forms of profanity, and seem to have good sense about not using them in inappropriate settings. So seeing profanity on a name tag isn't going to suddenly make them start saying the word over and over again. They can already use profanity all they want to at home.

 

I think I'd tell my child that having the b-word on her own nametag, when she herself is working, wouldn't exactly be a path to success, as so many people are offended by profanity. I don't see it as the smartest choice on the employee's part, because someone probably will complain eventually, and it could cost her her job.

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alenushka View Post

I would confirm first. Some foreign name can be spelled in a way that can seem offensive to a an English speaker. and vice versa.
Exactly this. I went to school with a girl whose name looked a lot like an offensive word. It was pronounced differently but anyone seeing it on a name tag would have done a double take.
post #7 of 15

I would ask to speak with the manager at that moment and bring it to their attention.  Depending on their reaction, I might continue and contact corporate (if they blew me off).

 

Sorry, but I refuse to submit to profanity in public places, where there ARE controls to stop it.  The employee should be taken to task for doing this.  Obviously, it was done on purpose.

 

I have no problem with speaking up and asking people to "keep it clean"  regarding profanity when children are around.

 

What you do or say, in your own home, is your own business.  In public, keep it decent and show some respect to the people around you. 

post #8 of 15

I'd probably double check and then chuckle. I don't really care. Personally I would think it was tacky, but I would keep that thought to myself. If she had the F word or N word, then I would confront her though. No her manager, but her. I don't like starting at the top. 

post #9 of 15

You mean the B word that means a female dog?  I'm not sure that's bad enough even to be called "profanity."  I'd probably just laugh and point out to my kid that it probably wasn't going to help the waitress get more tips.  It doesn't harm me in any way if someone has a rude word on their nametag, so I would never even consider complaining to management.

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post

I honestly don't think I'd care about that issue. Using a handicapped spot can negatively affect someone who really needs the spot, but calling oneself the b-word (if the employee was indeed doing that) doesn't really affect others. But then, both of my daughters are familiar with the b-word, and other forms of profanity, and seem to have good sense about not using them in inappropriate settings. So seeing profanity on a name tag isn't going to suddenly make them start saying the word over and over again. They can already use profanity all they want to at home.

 

I think I'd tell my child that having the b-word on her own nametag, when she herself is working, wouldn't exactly be a path to success, as so many people are offended by profanity. I don't see it as the smartest choice on the employee's part, because someone probably will complain eventually, and it could cost her her job.

 

The reason I called wasn't so much about the space not being available for someone else, but that it looks really bad on your company to use handicapped spots.  I'd feel the same way about cursing employees or bad words on name tags.  In my past life I was a retail manager and if one of my employees was doing something that presented my company in a negative way I'd want to know.  

post #11 of 15

I never would have even thought about this as an issue before, but now that my daughter is learning to read, she sounds out everything. What a pain and so unnecessary to have to spell out to a child what someone's name tag says that is obviously so immature they need to let the public know.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daffodil View Post

You mean the B word that means a female dog?  I'm not sure that's bad enough even to be called "profanity."  I'd probably just laugh and point out to my kid that it probably wasn't going to help the waitress get more tips.  It doesn't harm me in any way if someone has a rude word on their nametag, so I would never even consider complaining to management.

Same here.
post #13 of 15

I might go, "Excuse me, how do you pronounce that?"

post #14 of 15

you used the word woman in your poll wording. 

 

was it a woman or a teenager or young un - thinking its really funny?

 

if it was a teen i'd do nothing. i'd look at my dd roll my eyes and say teenagers sometimes do silly things. 

 

to me the context matters a lot. 

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daffodil View Post

You mean the B word that means a female dog?  I'm not sure that's bad enough even to be called "profanity."  I'd probably just laugh and point out to my kid that it probably wasn't going to help the waitress get more tips.  It doesn't harm me in any way if someone has a rude word on their nametag, so I would never even consider complaining to management.

Me too. If my child noticed it, I might make some joke (privately, to my child) that her mom must have been angry when she named her that, or whatever. In our family, that incident would probably be fuel for days of joking about what not to name your baby. That is just our style. Even if it were a truly "bad" word, it would not occur to me to make any kind of issue of it. We run into all sorts of people and their strangeness, and I would prefer to teach my kids not to get upset over things that don't effect them.

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