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Fast Food Baby - Page 3

post #41 of 47

I grew up in the 70's in an upper-middle class suburb of NYC.  My parents were both Irish immigrants who grew up on rural farms.  My mother knew how to cook, understood nutrition basics, but just didn't care enough to provide us with homecooked meals.  She was usually drunk when we came home from school.  If she was half in the bag , we'd actually drive to get Chinese take-out, pizza, McDonald's or on Wednesdays she would take advantage of the "Wednesday is Sundae " at Carvel.  Sure, we thought it was great.  If she was too drunk to drive she'd open a bag of frozen chicken and veggies , put it in a pot and add water. If she was passed out, my older brother would make pasta and add a can of sauce.  We ate homeooked meals on the weekends when my dad was home.  Meat and potatoes, Irish stew, good, hearty farm food.  Nevertheless, when I went to college and lived with a few women in a rented house off campus I discovered many fruits and vegetables I never knew existed.  I borrowed their Moosewood Cookbooks and taught myself basic nutrition and how to cook nutritious meals.  I started eating correctly for the first time in my life and I was furious at my mother for her neglect.

Sometimes you just have to face the facts that certain parents don't give a crap about their children's welfare.

post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jabs View Post
 

I grew up in the 70's in an upper-middle class suburb of NYC.  My parents were both Irish immigrants who grew up on rural farms.  My mother knew how to cook, understood nutrition basics, but just didn't care enough to provide us with homecooked meals.  She was usually drunk when we came home from school.  If she was half in the bag , we'd actually drive to get Chinese take-out, pizza, McDonald's or on Wednesdays she would take advantage of the "Wednesday is Sundae " at Carvel.  Sure, we thought it was great.  If she was too drunk to drive she'd open a bag of frozen chicken and veggies , put it in a pot and add water. If she was passed out, my older brother would make pasta and add a can of sauce.  We ate homeooked meals on the weekends when my dad was home.  Meat and potatoes, Irish stew, good, hearty farm food.  Nevertheless, when I went to college and lived with a few women in a rented house off campus I discovered many fruits and vegetables I never knew existed.  I borrowed their Moosewood Cookbooks and taught myself basic nutrition and how to cook nutritious meals.  I started eating correctly for the first time in my life and I was furious at my mother for her neglect.

Sometimes you just have to face the facts that certain parents don't give a crap about their children's welfare.

Sorry that happened to you. It's great you were able to learn nutrition at a later time. That's how I was. We ate fruits and vegetables and home cooked meals but they were still mostly part of the SADiet. I was "healthy" but had some health problems come to light after graduating high school and needed to kind of "reboot" my diet to solve a lot of health issues. I only recently learned about real nutrition and am greatful I don't have have picky eaters. :eat

post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by BaileyB View Post

I'm not sure anyone was sticking their nose up in the air or anything. I think most or all of us are legitimately shocked that people feed their kids this way, ie: giving a 19 month old up to 6 cans of coke a day. Giving him that much pop has nothing to do with being poor (which they are not) or not knowing that that is bad for him. And I wasn't saying that people were wrong for letting their kids have corn dogs at the fair, I was saying that I was surprised at the number of families where all the people were obese. I'm not talking about heavier person who is healthy, I'm talking about obesity. I don't think sharing a healthy snack with an overweight kid at school is going to make their parents wake up and stop giving them junk food, for whatever reason they have, for every meal. The 'everybody just needs a hug, and everything will be better' attitude just doesn't work and having a greater and greater number of people raising kids with terrible eating habits is going to effect everybody.

I think not watching the video, skimming posts, and then saying that we are all bashing fat people and being snobs is a little bit judgemental.

I read all the posts here and yes, there is some thick, heavy judgement being passed. But sadly, that doesn't surprise me in the least because the mommy wars have proven to be quite prevalent here in recent years.

As to your example of the 18 month old who drinks 6 cans of Coke a day - first could you point out to me where that was mentioned (I seemed to have missed that) and second please tell me that no one here really thinks that is a true tale. A young child consuming 72 ounces of carbonated beverage would have a difficult time having enough room in their stomach to consume much else. Sadly overdramatizing situations like this only polarize people even more.
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCMoulton View Post

As to your example of the 18 month old who drinks 6 cans of Coke a day - first could you point out to me where that was mentioned (I seemed to have missed that) and second please tell me that no one here really thinks that is a true tale. A young child consuming 72 ounces of carbonated beverage would have a difficult time having enough room in their stomach to consume much else. Sadly overdramatizing situations like this only polarize people even more.

The 18 month old who drinks up to six cans of Coke a day was a direct reference to the video in the first post. He didn't consume much else (and when he did, it was fast food or junk and he obviously had major sleep issues from the caffeine/sugar that he was bombarded with daily).

post #45 of 47
Why does this always come up that discussing something is judgmental? I thought these posts have been quite fair.

As for the whole "not my problem" part, it is everyone's problem. These children can't speak for themselves so they need someone to advocate for them. Obesity/bad eating causes diseases that have a financial cost born by all society. The sick use limited resources that could be used elsewhere. For an example a diabetic will have more infections, they'll take more antibiotics, speeding up how fast bacteria become resistant. So when I have an infection maybe the antibiotics won't work for me.
Yes carrots and honey are nicer and its great to share those ideas. However research shows in general people are more motivated by the stick. Hence anti-smoking adds showing bad consequences.

The
Quote:
Originally Posted by skinnyloveBC View Post

I didn't read all of the posts... I scanned but couldn't bring myself to indulge in all of the criticism--open and veiled. My heart aches for the countless moms who are doing their best but are having
post #46 of 47
We grew up poor- I suppose it is fortunate that we were so poor we grew turnips and beets and my dad shot squirrel and deer for meat. Seems like most were poor where I grew up and all of them knew how to grow a handful of turnip seeds or some pole beans. We weren't urban, obviously. We also foraged, picking mushrooms and wild greens and even stealing cover crops from the army corps of engineers land. Catching fish. We survived. In time, we were less poor, and didn't have rely on these things so much, but we still did them.

So I did grow up eating actual food, seeing It cooked and canned and preserved.

Present day in my hometown it is totally different. The families living there for the most part depend upon fast food and processed meals from the store. I'm not being judgemental when I say that, it's just the truth. The old timers are dying off and the old way of surviving while poor is being lost.

I don't hear a lot of judgement in this thread, the video is sad. It is sad that whole generations are sick from fast food and processed crap. Is it happy? No. It's not even neutral. It's sad. The addictive ( and purposefully so) qualities of these foods is only creating a worse habit, so that it is nearly impossible for people to change their diets.

I dont see how saying this is sad or expressing a sense of helplessness when it comes to it is offensive.

What I learned as a kid was about survival. In the past, poor people of all races knew these basic skills. I wish there were an easy fix.
post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by tabitha View Post

We grew up poor- I suppose it is fortunate that we were so poor we grew turnips and beets and my dad shot squirrel and deer for meat. Seems like most were poor where I grew up and all of them knew how to grow a handful of turnip seeds or some pole beans. We weren't urban, obviously. We also foraged, picking mushrooms and wild greens and even stealing cover crops from the army corps of engineers land. Catching fish. We survived. In time, we were less poor, and didn't have rely on these things so much, but we still did them.

So I did grow up eating actual food, seeing It cooked and canned and preserved.

Present day in my hometown it is totally different. The families living there for the most part depend upon fast food and processed meals from the store. I'm not being judgemental when I say that, it's just the truth. The old timers are dying off and the old way of surviving while poor is being lost.

I don't hear a lot of judgement in this thread, the video is sad. It is sad that whole generations are sick from fast food and processed crap. Is it happy? No. It's not even neutral. It's sad. The addictive ( and purposefully so) qualities of these foods is only creating a worse habit, so that it is nearly impossible for people to change their diets.

I dont see how saying this is sad or expressing a sense of helplessness when it comes to it is offensive.

What I learned as a kid was about survival. In the past, poor people of all races knew these basic skills. I wish there were an easy fix.

Omg tabitha! Where did you grow up? Sounds like where I'm from- i could have written your post, word for word! Everyone was poor- even the "rich" kids. But I'm very proud of my upbringing & the fact that I have those skills & hope to pass them on to my kiddo.
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