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Do you let your child go UP the slide?? - Page 5

post #81 of 92

If no one else is using the slide and its not muddy then the little ones can run up and down it to their hearts content -  as long as its safe of course! :)

post #82 of 92

On an amusing side-note, I had an interesting instance of getting judged at the park a few weeks ago. Another woman sitting on the bench next to me commented to her friends that "Some people will let their kids do anything."

 

I'd just assumed she was referring to the woman who I think was the mother of a boy of about two who'd been running around swinging a big stick really close to some other kids. She'd gone up and told him to give her the stick, but when he swung it at her, she backed off and let him keep it.

 

But then, a moment later, the woman on the bench said, "Well, that girl finally got up off the ground" -- and I realized she was actually referring NOT to the stick-swinging toddler, but to my own 8yo dd lying down on the ground as part of her imaginary game. Of course, I'm the sort of parent who feels extremely proud whenever I see my kids getting fully immersed in their imaginary worlds, so I tend to be a bit taken aback when someone else expresses the idea that I shouldn't "allow" it. LOL.

 

And I think I ended up looking down my nose at her a bit later when she (if I'm remembering correctly) made a sudden decision that she was ready to go, and just expected her children, or the children in her care, to abruptly stop what they were doing and leave. "I" have a personal preference for allowing my kids at least 10 or so minutes of transition time, so it's extremely rare for me to just suddenly say, "We have to go now" and expect my kids to leave without any advance warning; I would only do so for a very good, and urgent, reason. And I kind of see "my way" as the right and considerate way to raise one's children. So there you go.

post #83 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
 

On an amusing side-note, I had an interesting instance of getting judged at the park a few weeks ago. Another woman sitting on the bench next to me commented to her friends that "Some people will let their kids do anything."

 

I think that the parents that are perceived as 'letting their kids to do anything', get judged more often than not.

 

 

And I kind of see "my way" as the right and considerate way to raise one's children. So there you go.

 

I see you are treating others as you would like to be treated, thats another way of putting it. I really cant think of a better principle than this one when it comes to parenting, or anything. Not always as easy do admittedly, even with kids.

post #84 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
 

On an amusing side-note, I had an interesting instance of getting judged at the park a few weeks ago. Another woman sitting on the bench next to me commented to her friends that "Some people will let their kids do anything."

 

I'd just assumed she was referring to the woman who I think was the mother of a boy of about two who'd been running around swinging a big stick really close to some other kids. She'd gone up and told him to give her the stick, but when he swung it at her, she backed off and let him keep it.

 

But then, a moment later, the woman on the bench said, "Well, that girl finally got up off the ground" -- and I realized she was actually referring NOT to the stick-swinging toddler, but to my own 8yo dd lying down on the ground as part of her imaginary game. Of course, I'm the sort of parent who feels extremely proud whenever I see my kids getting fully immersed in their imaginary worlds, so I tend to be a bit taken aback when someone else expresses the idea that I shouldn't "allow" it. LOL.

 

And I think I ended up looking down my nose at her a bit later when she (if I'm remembering correctly) made a sudden decision that she was ready to go, and just expected her children, or the children in her care, to abruptly stop what they were doing and leave. "I" have a personal preference for allowing my kids at least 10 or so minutes of transition time, so it's extremely rare for me to just suddenly say, "We have to go now" and expect my kids to leave without any advance warning; I would only do so for a very good, and urgent, reason. And I kind of see "my way" as the right and considerate way to raise one's children. So there you go.


I was at a play area with my 3 year old son and I was sat on a bench next to an elderly grandma. We were having a lovely chat when I realized it was near time for us to leave.  I called my son over and told him we have 10 minutes before we have to leave.  The grandma laughed knowingly, "Oh that is silly. He won't want to leave no matter how much warning you give him".  I decided not to get into a discussion so I just said that's just the way we do things and went back to our previous conversation. During the conversation, I gave my son a five minute warning. Before I could give him his two minute warning, he bounced up and said, "OK, ready to go". Grandma was floored.

 

As for slides, they can go up if it's the type of slide where they can see the top - and down-sliders get the right of way. I want my kids to play freely with other kids without a lot of parent intervention.  I want them to learn to negotiate with their peers and problem-solve. This leads me to another subject, I think I'll make a thread about it...

 

Does your elementary school have rigid playground rules?

post #85 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by beru View Post
 


I was at a play area with my 3 year old son and I was sat on a bench next to an elderly grandma. We were having a lovely chat when I realized it was near time for us to leave.  I called my son over and told him we have 10 minutes before we have to leave.  The grandma laughed knowingly, "Oh that is silly. He won't want to leave no matter how much warning you give him".  I decided not to get into a discussion so I just said that's just the way we do things and went back to our previous conversation. During the conversation, I gave my son a five minute warning. Before I could give him his two minute warning, he bounced up and said, "OK, ready to go". Grandma was floored.

 

As for slides, they can go up if it's the type of slide where they can see the top - and down-sliders get the right of way. I want my kids to play freely with other kids without a lot of parent intervention.  I want them to learn to negotiate with their peers and problem-solve. This leads me to another subject, I think I'll make a thread about it...

 

Does your elementary school have rigid playground rules?

I like your approach. We too rarely have problems leaving the playground. I typically say-'we  have to go soon, whas the last thing you want to do before we leave?'

post #86 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by beru View Post
 


I was at a play area with my 3 year old son and I was sat on a bench next to an elderly grandma. We were having a lovely chat when I realized it was near time for us to leave.  I called my son over and told him we have 10 minutes before we have to leave.  The grandma laughed knowingly, "Oh that is silly. He won't want to leave no matter how much warning you give him".  I decided not to get into a discussion so I just said that's just the way we do things and went back to our previous conversation. During the conversation, I gave my son a five minute warning. Before I could give him his two minute warning, he bounced up and said, "OK, ready to go". Grandma was floored.

again all depends on the child. 

 

gma would have been right about my child. dd WOULD come to me during her two minute warning and depending on her mood would scream and throw a tantrum or try to reason with me as to why we should stay longer. the ONLY time she would leave happily without a fuss is if we have something else fun to do. but going home for dinner was not a good enough reason to leave the park. 

post #87 of 92

NO.....never.

 

I also taught them not to stand in front of the elevator while waiting.  Or stop in front of doors.  While we were in the grocery store -they stuck close to me and didn't take up the entire aisle.  etc etc etc

post #88 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by lab View Post

NO.....never.

I also taught them not to stand in front of the elevator while waiting.  Or stop in front of doors.  While we were in the grocery store -they stuck close to me and didn't take up the entire aisle.  etc etc etc

I guess I don't really see those examples as analogous. There is nothing discourteous about climbing up the slide if you aren't blocking others from going down. You aren't inconveniencing anyone. And pretty much everyone on this thread who allows climbing has said that the rules are only if you can see the top and if no-one is waiting to come down.

I can see an argument for disallowing it on safety grounds but I admit I don't really get it as a manners thing.
post #89 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by katelove View Post


I guess I don't really see those examples as analogous. There is nothing discourteous about climbing up the slide if you aren't blocking others from going down. You aren't inconveniencing anyone. And pretty much everyone on this thread who allows climbing has said that the rules are only if you can see the top and if no-one is waiting to come down.

I can see an argument for disallowing it on safety grounds but I admit I don't really get it as a manners thing.

Its all about how much complexity a person can handle...

post #90 of 92

FWIW, our local parks/recreation people were discussing slides once and they made a point of how good it is for kids to work out negotiating slides with one another (up/ down/ taking turns).  The slide itself was seen as an instrument in growing social skills - not just something to zip down (or climb up).  I really appreciated their perspective.

post #91 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tjej View Post
 

FWIW, our local parks/recreation people were discussing slides once and they made a point of how good it is for kids to work out negotiating slides with one another (up/ down/ taking turns).  The slide itself was seen as an instrument in growing social skills - not just something to zip down (or climb up).  I really appreciated their perspective.

That is so cool! If you don't mind my asking, what region of the world do you live in?

post #92 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
 

That is so cool! If you don't mind my asking, what region of the world do you live in?

West Coast, Canada.

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