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what happens if you enroll your child in another town's school district using a relative's address? - Page 6

post #101 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post
 

 

In doing some academic reading on diversity in education (from that UCLA site I posted earlier) it seems that diversity in education serves kids from every place on the spectrum.

I agree. I see it as a real positive that dd1 is getting to go to a school where she's a racial minority.

post #102 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
 

I agree. I see it as a real positive that dd1 is getting to go to a school where she's a racial minority.

 

Yes, for us too. And also I found it really freeing as a parent to have a kid at a school that is fairly culturally and socio-economically diverse. There was *always* someone better off and worse off than DC when it came to any number of our parenting or financial choices. If DC's friend was going for France and we couldn't travel we talked about the number of kids in her class who are saving for a trip to FL and may never get overseas. If DC wants a phone we can talk about the various considerations about that. We can talk about values, saving, budgets and all that good stuff - all with some framework of diversity, privilege, and values. If I want DC to make her own lunch AND breakfast (gasp!) because I'm still nursing a toddler in the AM, we can talk about all different parenting choices around food, time, employment, independence, responsibility and etc.  

post #103 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post
 

 

Yes, for us too. And also I found it really freeing as a parent to have a kid at a school that is fairly culturally and socio-economically diverse. There was *always* someone better off and worse off than DC when it came to any number of our parenting or financial choices. If DC's friend was going for France and we couldn't travel we talked about the number of kids in her class who are saving for a trip to FL and may never get overseas. If DC wants a phone we can talk about the various considerations about that. We can talk about values, saving, budgets and all that good stuff - all with some framework of diversity, privilege, and values. If I want DC to make her own lunch AND breakfast (gasp!) because I'm still nursing a toddler in the AM, we can talk about all different parenting choices around food, time, employment, independence, responsibility and etc.

 

Yes, and one real downside of having dd go to school in a wealthy district, supposing there were a legal way to do this and we could have afforded the transportation costs, would have been how "poor" she would have felt in comparison to the other kids. Over the last few years, she's become very quick to notice that some other families in our church are a lot more financially comfortable than we are (In order to be part of a religious community that embraces liberal values and allows each person room to determine his or her own beliefs, we've joined a church in a denomination in which many of the people just happen to be highly educated and somewhat wealthy -- even though the church is still right in the middle of the city).

 

So I think getting to attend a school where most of the other kids get free lunches just like she does can help her keep things in perspective.

post #104 of 112

I live in an area that is second only to the Amish in people who send their kids to non-public schools. Of the teachers who actually teach in that district, 75% of them send their kids to private or religious schools. This is a very Catholic area, we have affordable Catholic schools and it is part of the culture here. The sucky schools only add to this. I teach in a different district where 95% of the residents send their children to public schools, so it's very different. If I could send my kids to school there without living in the district, I would. I refuse to move there because it is cancer alley. I'm not willing to risk their health; I'd rather pay for education.

 

As far as diversity, my girls go to a Catholic school that is just as diverse as the public schools. It was the first school in the country that believed in educating girls and African Americans. There are many AA students there because of the history. Her lunch table, chosen by the students, is 50/50 whereas in the public school I teach you don't really see that. Public doesn't always equal more tolerance.

post #105 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post

If DC wants a phone we can talk about the various considerations about that. We can talk about values, saving, budgets and all that good stuff - all with some framework of diversity, privilege, and values.

I was concerned about the financial divide when I made the decision to send our kids to the school they go to, as many of the families there are much more affluent than we are. And yes, according to DS lots of kids at school have iPhones. But our refusal to get him a cell phone isn't based on finances. Even if we had zillions of dollars, I wouldn't get my 8-year-old who is hardly ever away from me a cell phone.

So it's a learning experience for him, too, to talk with me about our values, and how being able to afford something doesn't automatically mean we'll get it. For us, being able to point out that lots of his classmates can't afford cell phones either wouldn't ever really enter into the discussion, since it's not a financial decision but rather one based our family's current needs and beliefs.
post #106 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by mar123 View Post
 

I live in an area that is second only to the Amish in people who send their kids to non-public schools. Of the teachers who actually teach in that district, 75% of them send their kids to private or religious schools. This is a very Catholic area, we have affordable Catholic schools and it is part of the culture here. The sucky schools only add to this. I teach in a different district where 95% of the residents send their children to public schools, so it's very different. If I could send my kids to school there without living in the district, I would. I refuse to move there because it is cancer alley. I'm not willing to risk their health; I'd rather pay for education.

 

As far as diversity, my girls go to a Catholic school that is just as diverse as the public schools. It was the first school in the country that believed in educating girls and African Americans. There are many AA students there because of the history. Her lunch table, chosen by the students, is 50/50 whereas in the public school I teach you don't really see that. Public doesn't always equal more tolerance.

 

I'm kind of famililar with your area (my family owns a house in New Orleans). We also live in an area with a lot of private schools but I don't know the percent of the city population who use private -- but I do know it isn't anywhere near that of the Amish. What percentage of children use private in your parish? 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post

So it's a learning experience for him, too, to talk with me about our values, and how being able to afford something doesn't automatically mean we'll get it. For us, being able to point out that lots of his classmates can't afford cell phones either wouldn't ever really enter into the discussion, since it's not a financial decision but rather one based our family's current needs and beliefs.
 
Yes, of course that conversation can be had no matter the school choice. I'm actually not 100% sure what the criteria is when studying the advantages of a diverse education...but whatever it is it certainly is not the end all be all. I hope I didn't come off as saying that if a parent can't find a diverse setting for their kids that they will somehow be disadvantaged. Certainly there are ways to make up for that - and I think many private schools do a good job of trying to off set that. 
post #107 of 112

As of 2012, 40% of Jefferson parish residents send their children to non-public schools. In the state of LA, 20% of residents choose non-public schools. Pre-Katrina levels were higher; since Katrina, there have been a number of good charter schools and magnet schools that have opened. One silver lining to that storm was it blew up the dysfunctional school system in Orleans parish. While LA ranks near the bottom of the educational polls, if you take out two of the 64 parishes, we jump about 30 spots.

post #108 of 112
Greet summary, Mary. Thanks!
post #109 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post
 

 

Again, this is not to say that parents should send their kids to a really damaged school...but to say if the choice is between a school with some things that look like challenges on the surface, that those things should be investigated for their real impact rather than assumptions made from the outside. 

What you said in that one sentence is what I was trying to say with my several posts! :-)

post #110 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by mar123 View Post
 

As of 2012, 40% of Jefferson parish residents send their children to non-public schools. In the state of LA, 20% of residents choose non-public schools. 

 

I have been trying find some stats on Baltimore (all of the government sites are down) and MD because I do know that we have a heavy concentration of private schools - but for Baltimore I think it's statistically high in number of individual schools rather than an especially high percentage of city residents using private. For two reasons - for one, many our private schools tend to be VERY expensive - over $20,000/year. Being Maryland, we have a lot of Catholics too but the Catholic schools (although equipped to handle a large student body -- these were once free to members of the congregation and had HUGE class sizes - huge!). are closing left and right (making room for lots of charter schools to fill their halls). For one thing, these schools aren't like "totally cheap". They are around $500/month for one child. Also, some have a good reputation and some just don't - not for academic achievement. Now on to the other schools -- they are just so expensive. They cost about the same as the per capita income in our city. From what I know in your area there seems to have less income disparity from what we see up here. MD is the wealthiest state in the union and the poverty in Baltimore has got to be up there. It's a weird place, for sure.  

 

This, again, getting into how our towns and cities influence how we frame this discussion. 

post #111 of 112

I found the info from a local newspaper article. New Orleans is a very poor parish; there is very little tax base, although that has improved since Katrina- many young people have moved in. Most of the people who work there live in a neighboring parish. Jefferson Parish is a suburb- so you have a combination of people who make pretty good money combined with tradition and not so great schools.

 

Our Catholic elementary schools average about $5,000 a year; high schools are around $8,500. Most people I know who send their kids to Catholic schools sacrifice quite a bit, like we do. Non-religious private schools tend to be around $18,000 a year. I have three kids in Catholic high school this year because they start in 8th grade. I'm a teacher and my dh is a purchasing agent- we don't make a lot of money. We drive 7 year old cars, don't go on vacation, and eat at home most nights. I look at what we pay and think how much we could do with that money, but it's a very short time in their lives. Our state a free college tuition program for students who have a 2.5 GPA and 20 on the ACT; 100% of students at the schools my kids attend qualify for that every year. That equals about $30K over 4 years.

post #112 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by mar123 View Post
 

I found the info from a local newspaper article. 

 

 

Interesting. What little I can find with the government shut down certainly leads to your parish being unique. (Just realized that JP is where Meterie is, which is were we grocery shop when down there. The neighborhood around the store is full of little Catholic icons in front yards and etc. It's a small world.) It looks like the country average is 10% for private schools.  Where private is considered the choice of the "average" citizen, I think I'd consider it much more and also would be fine if my kid's PS teachers chose that route. Still...my car is 30 years old and I still don't think we could afford it -- and we aren't considered "poor" by our city's standards by any stretch. I have always been curious about life for families in New Orleans. I do know a few teachers down there but I guess we normally talk about other things. Thanks for sharing! 

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