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Thoughts on "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons"?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I would love some thoughts from people who have used this book. I am homeschooling my 6 yo using Oak Meadow First Grade Curriculum. For the most part I like it but I am not sure how much it is helping her reading so far. She already knows all of her letters and their sounds. She can sound out some words but often just starts guessing instead of really trying to figure it out. She knows a lot of words by sight but the sight word approach is terribly boring to her. We can work through a lot of Level 1 Early Readers together but it seems to me that she has a lot of the pieces to reading but hasn't been able to put them together yet. I guess I am looking for something that isn't just phonics or sight words, but teaches HOW to put it all together. Would something like this book be good for that? Or are there better ones out there?

post #2 of 11

I've used it twice and am using it right now.

 

It works fine. I hate it personally, but it's easy, quick and it works. I've never gotten past lesson 30 or so, they just no longer need it. I find it boring and that it moves too slowly and draws everything out, BUT, like I said, it works and it's relatively painless for the learner, so I will keep using it until/unless a child objects or needs a different method.

 

The program works best (IMO) for children who are already on the brink of reading, or who need a little extra confidence. I would not use it with a child who is not already 90+% there with pre-reading skills, or who may not be developmentally ready to read. I delay formal learning until age 7-8 unless the child asks to learn earlier. I have used it with my oldest at age 8, my second at age 5, and now using it for my 8YO nephew and 7YO niece. 

post #3 of 11

i used it but didn't take more than about 20 lessons. used it in conjunction with sounding out 3 letter words. 

pick up some 3 letter word books and work on those. they are easy to sound out, and build confidence.

it's a fine book. didn't take long, one lesson a day, and she was reading within a month.

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the feedback guys. It sounds like it might be what I am looking for.

post #5 of 11
I picked it up at a yard sale. I hadn't intended to use it as I had heard great things about Ordinary Parents Guide to teaching Reading. But we went ahead and started 100EL and my 5.5 y/o loves it. I find it boring but she asks for it-- we are somewhere in the 60s lessons and she is reading a ton on her own. It takes is 5-15 minutes per lesson. We use a separate workbook for handwriting.
post #6 of 11

I bought this book but did not enjoy it at all, and so, we set it aside. I think there are many successful approaches, and it's good to know ourselves and switch things up so that they are natural and fit us as well as our children.

 

We've used Oak Meadow for 12+ years now. The best "advice" on reading I've ever received came from the first page of the old-fashioned 1902 McGuffey reader. I settled right down, took their approach, read every day to all of our children, and everyone learned when he was ready to learn.

 

Now, all of these years later, it's the late bloomer who is the voracious reader, a sweet, amazing intellectual. It's a good reminder to me that I'm not in control. I'm just the guide in the process.

 

Trust your own intuition. If 100 lessons feels good for you and your child, go for it.

 

peace,

teastaigh

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by teastaigh View Post
 

We've used Oak Meadow for 12+ years now. The best "advice" on reading I've ever received came from the first page of the old-fashioned 1902 McGuffey reader. I settled right down, took their approach, read every day to all of our children, and everyone learned when he was ready to learn.

 

could you pls summarize this best advice on reading? many thanks.

post #8 of 11
I got it out of the library....but it honestly looked like the most boring book on the planet. I don't think I'm going to bother with it.
post #9 of 11

The actual book itself has a one-description that I think would be worth reading if you are interested in a summary. The book costs 50 cents or so, is plentiful in libraries, and is available free online. Anyway, the approach is a natural one that includes the natural process of decoding with both whole language and phonics without breaking it down in a painful manner for the student.

 

A mom who used McGuffey to teach reading naturally describes it here:

http://sentenceandsolaas.wordpress.com/2013/07/18/mcguffeyreaderone/

 

The 1836 version of the book is available in chunks here:

http://www.mcguffeyreaders.com/1836_original.htm

 

with pages labeled "suggestions" to help the teacher.

 

My son and I still read the stories and poems from time to time as they are classics and special memories.

 

I would also mention that many people have success with the readers as well as with "Dick and Jane" because the font is easier to understand for a lot of children. I remember this being discussed in years passed here on Mothering.

 

peace,

teastaigh

post #10 of 11

CrunchyMama, my daughter is currently going a set of 30 books I downloaded for her on an ipad.  You can print them (each has a booklet print function) if yours would rather have paper versions instead.  Mine is one that rather read "real books" instead of endless string of phonics activities.  She also loves finishing a book and feels like she has accomplished something.  For these reasons, she is really enjoying going through the books and checking them off her list.  She reads one new one and three she has already worked on everyday as a way of practicing.  As for me, I find the books' gradual incline really appropriate for a beginner reader.  

 

Here is a link if you are interested in downloading them: https://www-k6.thinkcentral.com/content/hsp/reading/storytown/na/grk/decodable_books_9780153745546_/index_grk_ca.html

 

I hope this helps.

 

E.

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the feedback everyone! The comments really helped. We decided to try it out and although it seems dull and boring to me my DD is actually really enjoying the lessons so far. It seems to be suiting her needs for where she is at.

 

Emaye - Thanks for the link. We tried doing some early readers but it was like pulling teeth for her! Even though she did have a sense of accomplishment after finishing a book it was still a struggle. The ones you posted look short and sweet which she may have more patience for.

 

teastaihj - That was really interesting reading about the McGuffey system. I would be interested in finding them but $105 is a bit steep unfortunately. I may try the library. On the other hand it may be worth it if I use it for all 3 of mine. The books are beautiful!

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