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What Vaccines Are You Getting for Your Children?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
That's pretty much my question. I thought it would make a good ice breaker for the new and improved sub-forum. smile.gif
post #2 of 6

If I were vax'ing, I would get DTaP & MMR. (For Pertussis, Tetanus, & Measles only, however that is what is available). DTaP would be Daptacel, MMR would be (unfortunately) the only one available in the US, altho I might look into the M&R, if I could get access. And maybe Flu. That is pretty much it, I would still subscribe to the idea of 'expectant vaccination', and vaccinating for diseases that actually circulate . . . (This also assumes ExBF and no daycare, if daycare were added, I might consider Hib and/or HepB. If BF were subtracted, I might be into Rota). 

 

Unfortunately, DTaP & MMR are pretty reactive . . . Some folks would put Polio on the above list, but I think that is pretty much purely emotional, because it is really not a risk in the US currently.

 

When my child was older, I might consider the Menningitis vax, but I would rather just have them avoid dorms/barracks, as I see them as the human equivalent of a CAFO, with probably more s*x.

post #3 of 6

Good question, T.

 

Well, as everyone can see from my dT thread, we were trying to get the dT for them but have run into the wall of pig-headed Australian bureaucracy and we have to wait until the kids are 10 years old to start that series (unless we move back to Canada before then :wink ).

 

Others we're considering...MMR before puberty. We'd do one shot only and check titre level. 

 

Further down the list...chicken pox and meningococcal. Varicella just because it sucks to get it as an adult (one of my friends got it at age 24 and it was a rough road for her) and meningococcal because the risk factor goes up in the teen years and as it strikes so quickly, it's on our radar. We've had a few cases reported locally in recent months but I think for the most part they are serotype-B, which is the most common strain here and of course, not included in the vaccine. The local health authority says 90% of the cases here are group B.

 

I'm still not decided on hep B. It's always been in the "no" column but as the kids get nearer to their teen years, we have to re-evaluate everything with a new set of risk factors.

 

Ones that are not on our list...flu (the flu vax fiasco is still fresh on everyone's minds here), polio (unless the kids decide to travel to Asia for school trips), HPV, pertussis (one kid's had it naturally already). And of course, now they're too old for rota, Hib, and Pc.

 

Of course, with no no-fault compensation program here in Australia either, it also affects how willingly we jump into vaxing knowing there's no safety net whatsoever. 

 

Edited to add: of course, once they're 18, they can get the flu vax every year, get boosters for whatever, knock themselves out. It'll be up to them, as adults, to make health decisions for themselves.


Edited by japonica - 9/21/13 at 10:04pm
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Sorry for the delay. I wanted to see if more responses came in, but this sub-forum hasn't traditionally been a hotbed of activity!

Our definite yeses are DTaP, MMR and polio. The latter is a slightly irrational move on my part, true to Dinahx's point above. That disease scares the crap out of me, even though it's no where near my neighborhood. We do hope to travel in the future, so it's just as well that they have it.

The definite no's have been rota, chicken pox, (may get that at adolescence), Hep B (ditto), Hep A (that could depend on where we travel), HPV, influenza, and . . . I'm sure I'm leaving something out. lol.gif

I'm on the fence about the meningitis ones--scary stuff, but I'd also hate to contribute to the surge in replacement serotypes.

Just so you know, I don't think that having pertussis confers permanent, natural immunity. That's just an I-read-something-somewhere statement. I'm not telling you what to choose either way, and you may want to look that up. As pathogens go, pertussis is a smart 'lil bastard! lol.gif

What's odd to me is that if the year were 1981, I'd be a fully compliant parent and able to live in any U.S. state without ever enduring the rigamarole and stigma of filing an exemption. I'd also probably look down on non-vaxxers and wonder what the hell was wrong with them, just as I used to. The powers that be love to blame Wakefield and McCarthy for vax skepticism and pretend like conflicts of interest and the over-bloated schedule, including vax requirements for diseases not transmissible in classrooms, have nothing to do with it.
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turquesa View Post

Just so you know, I don't think that having pertussis confers permanent, natural immunity. That's just an I-read-something-somewhere statement. I'm not telling you what to choose either way, and you may want to look that up. As pathogens go, pertussis is a smart 'lil bastard! lol.gif
 

 

Yeah, I know. Wasn't one study done citing anywhere from 4-20 years for natural immunity? I must have had some left (having had pertussis in my late teens) as when my DH and DS were paroxysmal hacking all around me, I didn't come down with it.

 

There was a recent paper about just how smart pertussis is...interesting...

 

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0046407

 

Quote:
Our results suggest that the B. pertussis gene repertoire is already well adapted to its current niche and required only fine tuning to persist in the face of vaccination. Further, this work shows that small mutations, even single SNPs, can drive large changes in the populations of bacterial pathogens within a time span of six to 19 years.
post #6 of 6

Well none before 24 months. And then DTaP, IPV and MMR and one HiB. We do one at a time and run titers. So no to 5 DTaP, we do 3 and a 4th after the 4th birthday to satisfy the darn school (cause pertussis outbreaks happen more and more due to the poor vaccine performance and then we would be excluded from school). 2 IPVs and a third after the 4th birthday. One MMR and titers are excellent. IPV is due to travel in the future. If we go to an OPV country.

At 10-12: HepB, meningo

Maybe: varicella - but I don't trust it. I've had the vaccine and just won't produce antibodies. HepA if we travel to certain countries.

100% no: Prevnar, HPV, rota, flu,

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