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Article: "Home Birth Safer Than Hospital Birth: Nation-Wide Study Netherlands"

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

http://healthimpactnews.com/2013/home-birth-safer-than-hospital-birth-nation-wide-study-netherlands/

 

"Yet another study, this one consisting of every birth in The Netherlands over two years, demonstrates that home births are safer than hospital births. Women are more than twice as lifely to end up in intensive care if they give birth in a hospital! Nonetheless, birth has been medicalized, resulting in enormous harm to both mothers and babies."

 

This article came across my facebook feed today. I thought it would be relevant here, especially in light of recent discussions about home birth safety. 

 

I'm going to start with throwing this out there:

 

I think that the mother's safety is an important factor in making birth choices, equal to that of the baby. When considering research, we need to consider both parties.

post #2 of 8

So if we're supposed to extrapolate some truth about the safety of home birth based on the practices in another country, how do we reconcile information from other countries? Countries where large numbers of women give birth OOH, like in Sub-Saharan Africa?

 

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0017155#s4

 

It seems that we have to make a lot of assumptions when comparing the form of midwifery and OOH birth (Netherlands) in one country with another (the US).

 

Which begs the question: why leave out the data from countries which proportionally have the most OOH births? This should be able to provide us with evidence for what makes OOH safe and unsafe, should it not?

post #3 of 8

Women in developing countries are unlikely to have decent nutrition, prenatal care, a trained attendant at the birth, or really any sort of medical care period. You really can't make any sort of comparison of OOH births in countries because our infrastructure isn't comparable - in the US we can quickly transfer to a hospital in most areas, we have highly trained attendants at home births (usually), access to prenatal care and screenings, the ability for high risk women to give birth in the hospital, and so forth. There are too many uncontrollable, dissimilar factors in less developed countries. Somewhere like the Netherlands has a system a lot more comparable to ours, the only substantial difference being the greater number of OOH births. 

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

"Countries where large numbers of women give birth OOH, like in Sub-Saharan Africa?"

 

You're kidding right? You're talking about mostly unattended births of women who are undernourished and generally have no access to any sort of emergency care, preventative, emergency or otherwise.

post #5 of 8
I agree that mothers are as important than babies. half of babies might be mothers one day too. During my birth the mw kept saying "all that matters is a healthy baby", which I found highly disturbing, not only becuse it was utterly terrifying to be totally dependent on someone who was admitting that they didn't think me or my health mattered, but also because I knew that she was saying that to justify abusing me. Usually when the value of two human beings is compared its for the purpose of justifying violence.
post #6 of 8
And yes, the feminist in me screams "I matter and I won't apologize for believing that", and I think about all the expectations throughout the ages about women and I'm flabbergasted that this persistent sexist message largely goes unnoticed.
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola P View Post

I agree that mothers are as important than babies. half of babies might be mothers one day too. During my birth the mw kept saying "all that matters is a healthy baby", which I found highly disturbing, not only becuse it was utterly terrifying to be totally dependent on someone who was admitting that they didn't think me or my health mattered, but also because I knew that she was saying that to justify abusing me. Usually when the value of two human beings is compared its for the purpose of justifying violence.

 

I'm sorry for what happened to you. Thank you for being willing to share your experience.

post #8 of 8

MW in Netherlands have exclusion criteria. OB see all patients, low and high risk. So, it is not surprising that hospital would l have higher proportion of women in ICU.

 

"

In the Netherlands, however, where the infrastructure does exist, home birth rates have nonetheless "dropped like a stone", according to Professor Simone Buitendijk, head of the child health programme at the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research. Confidence faltered after the death rate among newborn babies failed to decline as fast as in some other European countries. A series of media reports raised questions about the safety of home births, culminating in a leading national newspaper running a front-page splash entitled: "Don't Try This At Home."

"Soon, there will not be enough demand to justify the infrastructure," Buitendijk says. "Then the system will collapse – and let there be no misunderstanding: we won't be able to rebuild it."

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Mothering › Mothering Forums › Pregnancy and Birth › Birth and Beyond › Homebirth › Article: "Home Birth Safer Than Hospital Birth: Nation-Wide Study Netherlands"