or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Babywearing › Hip Dysplasia?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hip Dysplasia?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hey there,

 

I know I've been posting a lot. It's so nice to have somewhere to turn with my questions! I read an article today about hip dysplasia with front facing carriers (http://www.northernmum.com/2013/09/hip-dysplasia-why-we-should-burn-forward-facing-baby-carriers/) and I am concerned. As I have previously expressed, I'm still working on finding a carrier that works for us, so it's not as though I've been using a front facing carrier. However, I do carry my son facing forward sometimes so he can look around and sometimes his legs are dangling when I do so. Also, one of the carriers I was thinking of using (Infantino Breathe) can be front facing and that was part of why I thought he might like it.

 

Can I get some input from veteran baby wearers on this? Is this research consistent? Should my son's legs never be dangling? If so, until what age?

post #2 of 13

No, his legs should not be dangling.  

However, you will get major knee-jerk reactions from a lot of babywearers about how bad 'crotch danglers' are.  And they are not all wrong, they really are not greet or comfortable carriers for either Mom or Baby, but the hip dysplasia issue- they may well make an issue that already exists far worse, but using them for short times here and there is also not going to be causative. 

That said, return the breathe for something like the sash or the union, if you are really interested in Infantino as a brand. Many babywearers won't use them because of their business practices- they knowingly endangered babies in their now recalled 'bag slings'. 

Baby should be in a seated/supported M position. Knees should be above their bum, and suopport should be knee to knee.  This allows them the most comfortable and appropriate position, and is far more comfortable for you as well as the carrier really is supporting them instead of just attaching them to you. 

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks Rainbow. That's very helpful. The Breathe was a hand me down so there's no returning it, but good to know the potential dangers. Does that mean I shouldn't use it back facing either as it is a "crotch dangler"? Kind of a bummer because I thought he might like that one, but his health & safety are always priority.

I will definitely be more conscious that I don't let his legs dangle in my arms, as well. Is this consistent regardless of age? I wonder, is it bad for adults to have their legs dangling as well?
post #4 of 13

Honestly, I would use what you have for the time you can.  Those narrow based carriers with a tiny baby can actually come pretty close to decent support for a few weeks.  Beyond that,  you may want to find something else.  I am never a fan of forward facing out with a baby to begin with.  If they want to see more when they are older, a nice high back carry is far more comfortable and provides more security if they want to turn away from everything going on. Teeny babies though, really don't have the vision to need to look out at things anyway, they can see Mom's face and beyond that, lots of pretty blurs. 

Most people, when they hold a baby will naturally support them under the bum with their legs pulled up,.  I don't think you need to obsess about never having legs dangle, just work towards proper positioning as you are able, limit time in car seats, jumpers etc. But remember, it isn't causative, it can make things worse, but you won't cause dysplasia by putting a baby in a narrow based carrier or buying yourself a shower by using an exersaucer.  If there is already a problem, it can make it worse, but normal use of anything of that sort isn't going to be a huge problem, extended use might be, but then I doubt you plan to put your child in a jumperoo for 8 hours a day. 

post #5 of 13

I haven't read your other posts so - does your child have hip dysplasia?  My daughter had it. It was my understanding that you don't want to use a carrier at all.  When I mentioned it, our ortho looked kind of horrified and just said NO, you can NOT use those.  She was in a Pavlik harness until she was about ten weeks old. 

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

No, my son doesn't have any hip problems. Just a FTM being overly cautious. :)

post #7 of 13

I have never heard of this!  I have worn my now 10 and a half month old daily since she was born!  I wear her in an Ergo, no problems  here.  I love wearing her, it keeps her close for snuggles on walks and at the grocery store, and I wear her on my back while I take care of the chickens and the dogs in the mornings, and she loves it too!

post #8 of 13

just came across this, try an ergo, we love ours!  (I am in no way affiliated with ergo baby by the way :)

 

"We’ve written about hip dysplasia before  and the importance of a well designed carrier that promotes the correct ergonomic position for baby.  Now the International Hip Dysplasia Institute has issued a statement that recommends the use of a baby carrier that supports a natural seated position, with the thigh supported at the knee joint, such as ERGObaby, as the best carrier to promote healthy hip positioning.

Supporting your baby’s healthy hip development, while supporting your active lifestyle, ERGObaby is really the only carrier you’ll ever need"
 

http://blog.ergobaby.com/2012/04/international-hip-dysplasia-institute-issues-statement-about-baby-carriers-and-healthy-hip-development/

post #9 of 13

Below is a link to an article I wrote on DDH. MAYBE some of you will find it useful. The research on this topic led me to write another article which I could not publish due it’s controversial nature with the medical establishment. However, I read medical abstract after abstract. I discovered doctors actually inadvertently create a dislocated hip in infants by using too much force in their testing to see if an infant has DDH to begin with.  We all know the majority of doctors are rushed and highly stressed but still, female doctors generally use less force. Also, my friend is a pediatrician in the US and she thinks the harness is OVER prescribed.  This can interfere with the developmental  process, touched on in the article below.  Is this done to protect against law suits and make money?  Excuse the cynicism. I do not like slings that face a baby outward for a number reasons and would avoid them for sure., especially with infants. But, that is another topic.
http://blog.ergobaby.com/2011/11/the-feldenkrais-method-as-it-relates-to-hip-dysplasia-in-infants/

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules831 View Post

Thanks Rainbow. That's very helpful. The Breathe was a hand me down so there's no returning it, but good to know the potential dangers. Does that mean I shouldn't use it back facing either as it is a "crotch dangler"? Kind of a bummer because I thought he might like that one, but his health & safety are always priority.

I will definitely be more conscious that I don't let his legs dangle in my arms, as well. Is this consistent regardless of age? I wonder, is it bad for adults to have their legs dangling as well?

It is not such a concern for adults because their skeleton has had a chance to develop - ligaments and cartilage have firmed up, bones have ossified etc.

There are also fewer opportunities for most adults to be in a "crotch dangler" situation. Unless you're a tree loper or rescue worker or something or spend a lot of time abseiling for fun there aren't that many narrow-based harnesses in everyday life. Also adults can tell if there is too much pressure being placed on a nerve or joint and do something about it. Babies can't.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by NiteNicole View Post
 

I haven't read your other posts so - does your child have hip dysplasia?  My daughter had it. It was my understanding that you don't want to use a carrier at all.  When I mentioned it, our ortho looked kind of horrified and just said NO, you can NOT use those.  She was in a Pavlik harness until she was about ten weeks old. 

I'm betting he's lumping all carriers with the crotch danglers since some carriers put the baby in basically the same position as the harness, and using an appropriate carrier is recommended as a means of treating hip problems in some areas where medical equipment is scarce. (I'm not saying a carrier should be chosen over a harness)

post #12 of 13

Hip dysplasia is something babies DEVELOP. All babies are born with loose joints. A 'crotch dangler' can allow the hip ball to slip out of the joint. If a baby is carried often or for longer periods of time it can allow this to happen. Carrying your baby with his legs hanging is different, unless you are ONLY holding him like this and all day. 

 

The carriers that have fabric that supports their entire thigh section, all the way to their knee bend, and puts the baby in the "M" position (imagine the baby's bum being the middle dip in the M with his knees the two top points and shins the two vertical lines of the M) keeps the hip ball in the joint. This joint is pretty malleable for the first year or so. The idea is to allow it to stay in the correct position while the bones become harder and can hold the hip ball in the joint.

 

Swaddling a baby too tight can also cause hip problems- if you swaddle the legs too. Safe swaddle techniques allows the babies legs to bend into the froggy position even when their arms are tucked in tight. 

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

There is some great info here. Thanks so much. It seems to me that, like many baby related topics, this might be something that is under-researched and overblown (not to discount anyone's beliefs otherwise). Considering my DS is almost never in a carrier at this point (still working on getting him to be comfortable), I have no real reason to be so concerned. We do have an Ergo that I have yet to try, so that is next on my list.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Babywearing
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Babywearing › Hip Dysplasia?