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Observations about pertussis and vaccines from a peds RN - Page 2

post #21 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperedmoth View Post
 

 

How did I not know that? Now I want a TDaP booster. Thanks, cwill

 

would recommend titers to be drawn, too, if you have not had it done already.

post #22 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperedmoth View Post
 

 

For what it's worth, I just got mine yesterday, at 14w2d. I'm entirely convinced of the safety: http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(10)02286-6/abstract and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23262941, just off the top of my Google Scholar. 

 

'Course, what it's worth might not be that much! ;-)

 

I'm not worried about the miscarriage risk. I saw some huge study done in Europe (forget which country). I'd actually have felt better about getting it in the first trimester, but I was in the first trimester in the summer. I wonder about the neuro effects of getting it in the second trimester. The baby's brain is developing so fast right now, and it's just hard to know what does impact brain development, and it'll take longer to see the results among kids whose mothers were vaccinated at this stage. I feel like we have a better understanding of what impacts organ development in the first trimester. I know it's not entirely logical, but it just kind of makes me go "eh" and want to wait a little longer. 

post #23 of 33

momtoafireteam, please be aware of what forum you are posting in when you respond to a discussion. The Vaccinating on Schedule forum is a support forum so you should be vaccinating on schedule to post in this forum.

post #24 of 33

Can I check something, for my own interest.

 

Do you guys receive a whooping cough booster in pregnancy?

 

Asking purely for info. AFAIK we don't (UK). I don't think we even test for antibodies. It doesn't affect me personally, just interested in the differences.

post #25 of 33

This recommendation just started within the last year, but yeah, it is recommended between week 27 and 36 now, to optimize transmission of pertussis antibodies to the baby. 

 

Here is a link from the CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6207a4.htm

post #26 of 33

Appreciate it. Its always interesting and useful to me, esp when debating this stuff in international forums, to get a sense of which countries do different things when. Like I say, unless its been introduced since my last child was born (nearly 6 years ago now!) we don't have it in the UK.

post #27 of 33
Thread Starter 

It has been awhile since I have been pregnant and I'm kinda out of the loop on pregnancy vaccines (risks, benefits, etc). I just remember having my titres done by the doctor. I had them drawn again for nursing school and saw that the rubella one did take that time, but varicella was weak. I had varicella as a kid (badly!) but somehow it was starting to wear off.

post #28 of 33

I've had mine checked. Immune to everything, happily!

post #29 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperedmoth View Post
 

I've had mine checked. Immune to everything, happily!

That must make you feel good! :-) Best luck to the rest of your pregnancy being healthy. 

post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwill View Post
 

 

This is not a debate thread.  But I wanted to point out that if you were a "rabid vaccinator", you probably would have received TDaP during pregnancy.  Receiving the TDaP during pregnancy allows for transfer of antibodies against pertussis through the placenta.    http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378%2810%2902286-6/abstract

 

 

I agree with your point in general, but Tdap is likely only going to provide protection for babies born at term based on the current recommendations. The current recommendation is to receive the vaccine between 28-36 weeks, so even everything lined up and a mother got the booster early, say around 30 weeks, it would still be very unlikely to offer protection for a preemie born at 32 weeks. That's not only because of the 2 weeks required for antibody production, but because maternal antibodies tend to transfer somewhat later in pregnancy due to changes in the placenta.

post #31 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ss834 View Post
 

 

I agree with your point in general, but Tdap is likely only going to provide protection for babies born at term based on the current recommendations. The current recommendation is to receive the vaccine between 28-36 weeks, so even everything lined up and a mother got the booster early, say around 30 weeks, it would still be very unlikely to offer protection for a preemie born at 32 weeks. That's not only because of the 2 weeks required for antibody production, but because maternal antibodies tend to transfer somewhat later in pregnancy due to changes in the placenta.

 Yes you are right. I guess that's why we count on "herd immunity." And it's also not well known that the pertussis vaccine does not always work very well. It's good to get titres. I wish more people would do that-- whether they vaccinate or not. 

post #32 of 33

Saying you're not going to vaccinate because they don't always work is like saying you're not going to use a carseat or a seatbelt because they don't always work.  I guess I can't say any more or it will be "debating..."

 

USAmm, thanks for sharing.  My grandfather was paralyzed from the waist down because of polio, it definitely had an impact on my view of vaccines.  I view vaccines in the same light as seatbelts.  Very rarely, seatbelts actually cause death.  But it's much more likely that it will save your life.  The chances of an adverse vaccine reaction are incredibly small (around 0.03%, iirc).  I'll take that risk over pertussis, diptheria, bacterial meningitis, etc, any day.

post #33 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fillyjonk View Post
 

Can I check something, for my own interest.

 

Do you guys receive a whooping cough booster in pregnancy?

 

Asking purely for info. AFAIK we don't (UK). I don't think we even test for antibodies. It doesn't affect me personally, just interested in the differences.

 

 

I received it at 37 weeks. Whooping cough is in my village, one of DS' friends has it and two newborns across the street are in hospital with it. The mother hadn't had the booster, and the child was unvaccinated. I hope my new baby is protected until he gets his in two weeks. SCARY!

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