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Delicate subject..Immunizations; what is everyone's view on it (without judgements on anyone...

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 

Im trying decide if I should start early immunizations for Griffin (2.5 months) or not. His dad doesn't care either way, which leaves it all up to me and I admit Im feeling under some pressure about it. My mom was very strong against vaccines and I was not immunized for anything, with the exception of the dead polio vaccine when I was 2 (I'm 34 now) and have a very good immune system. When I was pregnant, the blood test confirmed I was immune to Rubella, which means I had it at some point but didnt know! Im nervous about making the wrong decision...ugh. I've found talking to other moms about it brings on strong judgements either way, anything from " you might not believe in vaccines but when you become a parent YOU KNOW THEY ARE RIGHT" to the complete other side of the spectrum and bashing of people who decide it is right for them. Ive done research on why they aren't necessary but Im on the fence since I know I could regret not giving them. FOr example, where I live when I was pregnant there was an outbreak of whooping cough. I would hate it if Griffin got this just because I decided against immunizations. ugh. Im totally baffled. 

post #2 of 33
My grandfather was a doctor n thr pre-immunization era. And his was one during the Spanish influenza. Given what my grandpa has seen, he thinks immunizations are a miracle. We got the shots. Yes, they were tough, but far better than whooping cough or hepatitis. Also, because no Immunizatin is 100%, because Of the herd effect, not immunizing also puts others at risk (like my good friends' immunized but asthmatic toddler who got whooping cough from an unimmunized person--it was very very bad).

My 2 cents.
post #3 of 33
My Dr told me what Rhueling said basically. We did 3shots yesterday. I'm still getting over it emotionally & my sweet babys legs are sore she's very fragile. All i keep telling myself is that she'll be protected fromwhooping cough ect. It was hard but i think i am starting to feel i might have done the right thing. It felt manipulative to hear of the sicknesses the Dr has witnessed but I feel better knowing my baby has a better chance of being protected I guess. I know.its so hard to decide! When its unfamiliar things like more serious illnesses, i know I'll have a harder time doing them compared to cough but for now i feel relief, thankfully. I know I'd feel guilty it i hadn't done it yesterday. Now i must go put some RescueRemedy creme on her little legs.
post #4 of 33

I think vaccines are a miracle. We're having whooping cough outbreaks here in BC and it is heartbreak to read about people's children. 

It is so so hard to make a decision on vaccines because most (if not ALL) of the information out there is very, very biased towards one side or the other and they both use fear mongering to get a reaction, along with the implication that if you do/do not you are a "bad parent"
I'd like to say I think it's a personal decision, but when it comes to it, it's not. This is a decision that will affect my children and can have disastrous results for yours. 

I think it's a good idea to talk about spacing out vaccinations because if your child does have a reaction, it will be easier to figure out which vaccination it's to. 

 

Now, if your child has a reaction to the vaccination, that's a totally different story

post #5 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbownurse View Post
 

I think vaccines are a miracle. We're having whooping cough outbreaks here in BC and it is heartbreak to read about people's children. 

It is so so hard to make a decision on vaccines because most (if not ALL) of the information out there is very, very biased towards one side or the other and they both use fear mongering to get a reaction, along with the implication that if you do/do not you are a "bad parent"
I'd like to say I think it's a personal decision, but when it comes to it, it's not. This is a decision that will affect my children and can have disastrous results for yours. 

I think it's a good idea to talk about spacing out vaccinations because if your child does have a reaction, it will be easier to figure out which vaccination it's to. 

 

Now, if your child has a reaction to the vaccination, that's a totally different story

 

I have the same perspective as all of you. I also am feeling really anxious about putting Griffin through it but have been decided for some time that the benefits outweigh the consequences. But of course there is that deep feeling of what if I make the wrong decision...ugh.

 

Rainbownurse, the whooping cough thing is what is really making me go on the side of vaccinating. I also live in BC, in a small community of 3000 and where I live we had an outbreak, while I was pregnant. The parents of kids that were unvaccinated that got the whooping cough were judged really hard, while the parents of the ones that got it that WERE vaccinated blamed the un vaccinated child, yet no one knows for sure who got what first! what a mess. Anyways. Its a really hard decision. Thank you for the suggestion of spacing them out. That is definitely on my mind, since im having some anxiety about throwing them all at his tiny little immune system all at once. 

post #6 of 33

my husband also left the decision up to me, and I decided that I'd like Oliver to be immunized a little bit at a time.  he got the DTaP and Rotavirus vaccines at his two month appointment this week because the doctor and I both figured they protect against the diseases that present the biggest risk to him right now.  he'll get the IPV, Pc, and Hib vaccines in a few weeks, and we plan to follow the APA schedule more or less (just spacing the vaccines out a bit).  I'll probably wait until he's a bit older to give him the Hep B vaccine, and I think we'll wait to see whether he gets chickenpox before we give him that one.  I made my decision based partly on a public health concern, and also on the fact that I'll probably send Oliver to public school in Maryland.  the state requires vaccination against some things that I wouldn't necessarily choose to get for a five-year-old child (namely varicella and Hep B), but I don't feel strongly enough about it to fight it.  so far, Oliver hasn't seemed uncomfortable, hasn't run a fever, or seemed different at all since the vaccinations on Monday.

 

and as for personal history, I was vaccinated according to the schedule recommended in the 80s and 90s, and I also have a strong immune system.  I've never had the flu, and aside from recurrent strep throat as a teenager (which stopped after my carrier-little brother was treated with antibiotics too), I didn't really have childhood illnesses either (no ear infections, no chickenpox, no really nasty viruses, etc.).  I did get a chickenpox vaccine as a young adult when my mother got shingles, and I got the typhoid, yellow fever, and Hep A vaccines before I traveled to South America.  I'm trying to decide now whether I'll get a flu vaccine this year.  we won't be traveling or attending any big holiday gatherings, so I'm not sure that our exposure will be all that great. 

 

anyway, I just wanted to share what we're doing since it seems like you're looking for others' perspectives.  for me, it boiled down to this: vaccines seem to offer at least some protection against some serious diseases, and if our population stays (mostly) vaccinated against certain illnesses, it's less likely that we'll see big outbreaks of those diseases.  additionally, I didn't think the risks of the vaccines themselves were great enough to avoid them.  but I can imagine that other people would consider the same information I did and decide differently - it is a tough call to make.  I hope, no matter what you decide, that it works out for you and you feel good about it!  do let us know how you choose to go.  I'm curious too.

post #7 of 33

I also think vaccines are a wonderful thing. When I was doing research into them and realized the public health implications of vaccinating, how it has to do with more than just protecting my own baby, that really sealed the deal for me.

 

C got her shots Tuesday and was definitely groggy the next day. It was hard to watch her scream in pain/confusing after getting jabbed, but as I was comforting her I told her that it was much better than getting some awful disease.

 

Hep B was one that I was not sure of, but we have a family member who has chronic Hep B that we'll be seeing during the holidays. He also has developmental delays so although I know it's not spread by basic bodily contact, I'm not sure if this person's hygiene is top-notch. So I felt safer just going ahead with that one, too.

post #8 of 33
Vaccines are very tough for me and I rarely participate in conversations about them because I end up with hurt feelings (no thick skin here!).

My oldest children both had severe reactions to vaccines. My doctor at the offered no support and no information so we made the choice to stop vaccinating. My 4 year old is only partially vaccinated (we stopped after he reacted to the second set of shots). My 2 year old is not vaccinated. I struggle very much with this decision because either way, there is a chance I will be harming my children. The reactions were terrifying... But let's face it, so is polio!

We just got a new doctor who is much better and we are going to try vaccinating the two and four year old on an alternate schedule while keeping a close eye on them. If they have reactions, we will stop. The herd effect is in place for people like us, I suppose.

Ruby won't receive any vaccines until she is older.

It's not ideal but its the cards we were dealt and we are dealing with it the best we can.
post #9 of 33
It is so tricky isn't it? I wasn't vaccinated as a child and while I have a very strong immune system and didn't get any diseases I know partially I was protected because everyone around me was vaccinated. As an adult I hadn't done any boosters either until pregnancy and then I got the TDaP booster. It was a struggle for me to decide to do it but I knew I'd have to address it when the baby was born so it opened the door.
For Noor, we decided to skip Hep B at birth and will likely delay a lot longer. We also skipped the rotavirus, mainly because she won't be in day care so I think it reduces exposure. We gave DTaP at the two month appt and are giving HiB and PCV at 3 months, then pushing Polio to 8 months I think - basically the Dr Sears alternative schedule which my Ped is supportive of. So for noe she's only had one and while she looked shocked, panicked, and screamed bloody murder after getting it, she didn't really have any reactions afterward and that makes me feel better about continuing them. I'm not, however, discussing it with my mom because she's still against them and has all sorts of rude things to say about my bro and SIL who are vaxing on schedule with no exclusions, so I don't want to get into it with her.
post #10 of 33
Thread Starter 

heyitskalista, what sorts of reactions did your children have from the vaccines? Im sort of leery of asking my doctor about it because I dont think she will be supportive if I was to decide against vaccinating. I really felt bombarded by a lot of people I asked at first (on either side) so now im feeling like even wondering how to do it any other way than the way that the public health present it, could bring on some lecturing. 

post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Actiasluna View Post

heyitskalista, what sorts of reactions did your children have from the vaccines? Im sort of leery of asking my doctor about it because I dont think she will be supportive if I was to decide against vaccinating. I really felt bombarded by a lot of people I asked at first (on either side) so now im feeling like even wondering how to do it any other way than the way that the public health present it, could bring on some lecturing. 

This brings up so much...I didn't really want to do the vaccines....but didn't know what i wanter, or how to know...maybe i have convinced myself i am hsppy about it so i dont feel bad...i am so indecisive about things. I really do feel my Dr was pressuring me, so i thought she must be right, but now i wonder about how she'll show her support if we get side effects. I feel so rushed into it.& i felt she would judge me if i hadn't done the shots. I know she said she's keep us as her patient BUT after saying things like she did, about how those who dont do it expose others, i felt blamed. Like my daughter would make the whole office full of sick children....the dr talked about some scary illness of the brain, sounded so rare, but she said she sees it all the time, not sure what she meant but i thinj i acted out of fear. Maybe itd be that way either way.
post #12 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by heyitskalista View Post

Vaccines are very tough for me and I rarely participate in conversations about them because I end up with hurt feelings (no thick skin here!).

My oldest children both had severe reactions to vaccines. My doctor at the offered no support and no information so we made the choice to stop vaccinating. My 4 year old is only partially vaccinated (we stopped after he reacted to the second set of shots). My 2 year old is not vaccinated. I struggle very much with this decision because either way, there is a chance I will be harming my children. The reactions were terrifying... But let's face it, so is polio!

We just got a new doctor who is much better and we are going to try vaccinating the two and four year old on an alternate schedule while keeping a close eye on them. If they have reactions, we will stop. The herd effect is in place for people like us, I suppose.

Ruby won't receive any vaccines until she is older.

It's not ideal but its the cards we were dealt and we are dealing with it the best we can.

Kalista, i wonder what you mean about the herd effect being in place for people like you, as you said. I have thin skin too, so no pressure. I dont want you to feel bad b/c I'm worrying about what I've done & you've been thru it some.
post #13 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by here we are View Post


Kalista, i wonder what you mean about the herd effect being in place for people like you, as you said. I have thin skin too, so no pressure. I dont want you to feel bad b/c I'm worrying about what I've done & you've been thru it some.

 

The herd effect is when more than 80% of the population is vaccinated, generally the whole population is protected

post #14 of 33
My baby had 2 in one leg, 1 in the other. I hope she has.no reactions, i hope , i hope , i hope. I feel like.i dont even have time to know the side effects, everything is so full nowadays.
post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbownurse View Post

The herd effect is when more than 80% of the population is vaccinated, generally the whole population is protected
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbownurse View Post

The herd effect is when more than 80% of the population is vaccinated, generally the whole population is protected

This is so intense to think of. So if more people stop vaccinating, then the.herd effect could be lessened? Hard to.imagine what that would look.like as it evolved. I guess the worry is that we may lose the vaccinated herd.

Rainbow nurse, if a place like yours has an outbreak like that, how does it happen if the herd is vaccinated? Does noone rewlly know why? Is it both vacc/non vacc people that get sick? I dont get it.
post #16 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by here we are View Post



This is so intense to think of. So if more people stop vaccinating, then the.herd effect could be lessened? Hard to.imagine what that would look.like as it evolved. I guess the worry is that we may lose the vaccinated herd.

Rainbow nurse, if a place like yours has an outbreak like that, how does it happen if the herd is vaccinated? Does noone rewlly know why? Is it both vacc/non vacc people that get sick? I dont get it.

 

Yes, that is why outbreaks are happening, partially. Vaccine rates drop and illnesses go up. 80% is an approximation. Vaccines are not 100% effective, so some people will not be immune even if they have the vaccine, but it's more likely to happen the less people that are immune. Does that make sense?
Also, if your daughter hasn't had a reaction yet to her shots, it's unlikely to happen

post #17 of 33
Whooping cough is breaking out here too.
And I know this is more rare, but my dad had polio as a kid, so it's not 100% dead, though it seems almost impossible.

Julia got all her 2mo vaccines on schedule, and though her crying was torturous, she calmed down after just 20 mins or so. She seemed a little more fragile all afternoon, and she did sleep terribly that night, but was back to normal the next.

We massaged her legs and gave her acetaminophen to help with the pain.

And Kalista, you are absolutely right to make a judgement call when you see your babies being some of the few who react particularly badly to vaccines. I hope that as you said, herd immunity is there for your kids to stay safe.
post #18 of 33

I dont vaccinate anymore.  My first son (now 2) got one set of vaccinations at age 6 m, but I none since and I wont do any with this baby either.  It just makes me very uncomfortable.

This was posted on my facebook and I agree with it:

"I cannot parent in ways that make me uncomfortable, to make others comfortable." http://www.getrealforkids.com/resources/real-health/vaccines/2501-my-thoughts-on-vaccines

post #19 of 33
I don't vaccinate babies either. I haven't decided about certain ones when they are older. My big kids got whooping cough some years ago and I was ok with that, they were sick, we quarantined our household and called the health department and everyone we had been around when they were contagious. It was long and hard AND they haven't been sick with a cough in the three years since -previously they both had multiple hospitalizations for reactive airway and lung infections. Whooping cough changed them. Yep that sounds crazy, I know.

However, I'm so not ok with polio, menengitis or hepatitis, so it's a case by case basis, I'm still making my way there.
post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrenmoon View Post

s. Whooping cough changed them. Yep that sounds crazy, I know.

However, I'm so not ok with polio, menengitis or hepatitis, so it's a case by case basis, I'm still making my way there.

 

It actually makes sense if you think of their immune system like a hockey team. They were in JV league (previous colds/infections) and then they went up to the farm team (the hospitalizations) and then they hit the major league and went head to head with pertussis. And they won! so now they can take anything the JV and farm teams can throw at them.

I think it's great to take vaccines on a case by case basis. 

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