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From Acrodynia to Autism: Mercury Across Generations, More Evidence of Harm

post #1 of 114
Thread Starter 

email.constantcontact.com/Acrodynia-to-Autism--Mercury-Across-Generations.html?soid=1101201531086&aid=azW_myh9Ccw

 

This is a fascinating article showing some very clear links between acrodynia--known to be caused by mercury--and autism.



Edit: try this link instead: http://www.safeminds.org/blog/2013/10/15/repeating-history-investigating-pink-disease-highlights-many-similarities-autism/
Edited by Taximom5 - 10/16/13 at 3:47am
post #2 of 114
Darn. The link doesn't work for me.
post #3 of 114

Link doesn't work for me either but there is no link between mercury and autism. 

 

 

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/111/3/674.long

post #4 of 114
Thread Starter 
Fixed the link: http://www.safeminds.org/blog/2013/10/15/repeating-history-investigating-pink-disease-highlights-many-similarities-autism/. Not sure why the original site disappeared.

Wow, teacozy, are the authors of that pediatrics article totally clueless about autism? Or are they just lying?

For autism, they are listing a description of behaviors, without mentioning that those behaviors actually stem from the very conditions they list on the right, in the mercury poisoning column!

Yes, autistic children do have:
ataxia
loss of balance, coordination, and control
Constricted visual fields
Inability to coordinate speech
Dysarthria
Peripheral nerve damage, loss of nerve function, dulled responsiveness
Depression
Anxiety

Ask any parent of a child with moderate to severe autism, and they will likely have ALL of those symptoms, diagnosed by mainstream medical doctors, who recommend occupational therapy and/or physical therapy to deal with the vestibular/eye tracking issues, speech therapy, auditory/visual processing therapy, and, unfortunately, psychotropic drugs to deal with depression and anxiety.

Doctors who are wiser will also test for vitamin deficiencies, and treat those accordingly, as autistic children tend to have them, particularly B12 deficiency (which causes vestibular problems and peripheral neuropathy) and D deficiency, which causes anxiety and depression.

So, teacozy, since you apparently don't have a child with moderate to severe autism, you might not have known this before. But you do now, so maybe you'd like to edit your post?
post #5 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
 

Link doesn't work for me either but there is no link between mercury and autism. 

 

 

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/111/3/674.long

I just want to thank you for all the comedy - it's been :rotflmao reading all the nuttyness!  

post #6 of 114

Taxi, great video, thanks for posting. 


teacozy,

Quote:

Link doesn't work for me either but there is no link between mercury and autism. ​

 

I am going to assume your post is a result of you not having done much reading on autism and mercury poisoning, and is not an insult to the the mothers here who have autistic children. If you are planning on giving your child the annual flu shot (with thimerosal) for the rest of their childhood, I suggest you do some more research, I can't imagine anyone at this point taking the risk of giving their child a vaccine with mercury in it, however, important they feel vaccines to be, because there is mercury free alternatives.

post #7 of 114

I have done my research on the association between vaccines and autism and there is no evidence of a link.  Mercury was removed from most vaccines and yet autism rates did not drop. Another piece of evidence that the mercury in vaccines has nothing to do with autism.  

post #8 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
 

I have done my research on the association between vaccines and autism and there is no evidence of a link.  Mercury was removed from most vaccines and yet autism rates did not drop. Another piece of evidence that the mercury in vaccines has nothing to do with autism.  

teacozy, you are absolutely right, vaccines do not cause austism. Autism is a bogus disease created from a menu of behaviors as deemed by a committee of psychiatrists. Vaccines cause brain damage, (labeled autism), so by rights that is what the medical community should be calling it. Mercury has been proven to cause brain damage, so I urge you to not vaccinate you child with thirmerosl containing flu vaccines annually. Autism is a medical condition not a mental one.

post #9 of 114

Grandchildren of those who had pinks disease (caused by mercury poisoning) are more likely to have autism.

 

"Pink disease (infantile acrodynia) was especially prevalent in the first half of the 20th century. Primarily attributed to exposure to mercury (Hg) commonly found in teething powders, the condition was developed by approximately 1 in 500 exposed children.....Five hundred and twenty-two participants who had previously been diagnosed with pink disease completed a survey on the health outcomes of their descendants. The prevalence rates of ASD and a variety of other clinical conditions diagnosed in childhood (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, Fragile X syndrome, and Down syndrome) were compared to well-established general population prevalence rates. The results showed the prevalence rate of ASD among the grandchildren of pink disease survivors (1 in 25) to be significantly higher than the comparable general population prevalence rate (1 in 160). The results support the hypothesis that Hg sensitivity may be a heritable/genetic risk factor for ASD."

 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15287394.2011.590097?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed&#.Ul7AdtTD-kQ

post #10 of 114

Another recent study found no link between mercury and autism 

 

"However, a new study that draws upon more than 30 years of research in the Republic of Seychelles reports that there is no association between pre-natal mercury exposure and autism-like behaviors. 

“This study shows no evidence of a correlation between low level mercury exposure and autism spectrum-like behaviors among children whose mothers ate, on average, up to 12 meals of fish each week during pregnancy,” said Edwin van Wijngaarden, Ph.D., an associate professor in the University of Rochester Medical Center’s (URMC) Department of Public Health Sciences and lead author of the study which appears online today in the journal Epidemiology. “These findings contribute to the growing body of literature that suggest that exposure to the chemical does not play an important role in the onset of these behaviors.”

http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/?id=3893

post #11 of 114

teacozy, so that last piece of research you dug up, is your proof that mercury doesn't cause brain damage (aka autism)? uhoh3.gif

 

FWIW, I ate raw fish (sashimi) just about every day during my pregnancy with DS, and he isn't autistic, but then again, he isn't vaccinated. 


Edited by Mirzam - 10/17/13 at 9:26am
post #12 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post
 

Grandchildren of those who had pinks disease (caused by mercury poisoning) are more likely to have autism.

 

"Pink disease (infantile acrodynia) was especially prevalent in the first half of the 20th century. Primarily attributed to exposure to mercury (Hg) commonly found in teething powders, the condition was developed by approximately 1 in 500 exposed children.....Five hundred and twenty-two participants who had previously been diagnosed with pink disease completed a survey on the health outcomes of their descendants. The prevalence rates of ASD and a variety of other clinical conditions diagnosed in childhood (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, Fragile X syndrome, and Down syndrome) were compared to well-established general population prevalence rates. The results showed the prevalence rate of ASD among the grandchildren of pink disease survivors (1 in 25) to be significantly higher than the comparable general population prevalence rate (1 in 160). The results support the hypothesis that Hg sensitivity may be a heritable/genetic risk factor for ASD."

 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15287394.2011.590097?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed&#.Ul7AdtTD-kQ

 

I would say the sensitivity is epigenetic.

post #13 of 114
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
 

I have done my research on the association between vaccines and autism and there is no evidence of a link.  Mercury was removed from most vaccines and yet autism rates did not drop. Another piece of evidence that the mercury in vaccines has nothing to do with autism.  

Such a short post, yet so many errors, tea cozy!!

 

First of all there is evidence of a LINK between vaccines and autism.  You've kind of changed your wording from previous posts, which is a little suspicious.  You used to insist that there was no proof that vaccines cause autism, remember?  Now you're saying that there's NO evidence of a link?  You seem to be ignoring the evidence posted of exactly such a link, such as the studies here : http://www.fourteenstudies.org/ourstudies.html not to mention the link described in the OP!  

 

Second of all, your incorrect claim that "thimerosal was removed from most vaccines and yet autism rates did not drop" really shows that you did not do your research.   You see, the current official autism rate, as announced by the CDC, is based on data from 2008 regarding children born in 2000 or earlier.  Those children received the highest number of thimerosal-preserved vaccines, ever.

 

And that, of course, makes your final sentence grossly incorrect as well.  It's actually evidence that vaccines and autism are linked.

post #14 of 114

I thought I would share this still from the video (if you haven't watched it yet, I urge you to do so), it shows two photos side by side of a child with Pink's Disease and a child with Autism, uncanny.

 

post #15 of 114

Two kids caught mid-blink? That looks about as scientific as those old memes showing pictures of George W. Bush and a chimpanzee. 

post #16 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by erigeron View Post
 

Two kids caught mid-blink? That looks about as scientific as those old memes showing pictures of George W. Bush and a chimpanzee. 

good meme or bad meme - there is still a connection between Pinks disease and having autism in the family.  

post #17 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post
 

good meme or bad meme - there is still a connection between Pinks disease and having autism in the family.  

 

Not necessarily. 

 

I read that study a while ago and there are LOTS of problems with it.  First, the response rate to their survey was only 23%.  Why is that important?  When dealing with surveys, there is something called "response bias."  People tend to invest time and energy into completing and returning a survey if they think it is important.  If someone has an "axe to grind" about getting pink disease, he or she is more likely to fill out and return such a survey.  Now, if the response rate is high, response bias isn't likely to be a factor (either that, or everyone has an axe to grind).  When response rate is low, response bias is a real issue.
 
Second (and more importantly), the diagnosis of ASD was not confirmed.  It was simply reported by the person filling out the survey.  Now remember, the respondents had to be old, because teething power was discontinued a long time ago.  So the researchers were taking the word of an older person that his or her grandchildren had ASD.  Do these grandparents understand ASD well enough (and know their grandchildren well enough) to know that's the diagnosis?  How many grandparents, for example, confuse ADHD with ASD?  How many grandparents don't care what the doctors say and come up with their own diagnosis?
 
Third (and even more importantly), why don't the grandparents have ASD?  Remember, they are the ones with the REAL mercury exposure.  The mercury in vaccines is miniscule compared to the mercury in teething powders. They were exposed to enough mercury to get pink disease, but magically, they didn't get ASD.  Remember, this whole paper supposedly shows it's about genetic predisposition.  They had the genetic predisposition, or they wouldn't have been able to pass it on to their grandchildren.  Why don't THEY have ASD?
 
The paper clearly has some serious methodological flaws.  If you ignores those flaws, you have to explain how ASD magically skipped the people who were exposed to enough mercury to cause pink disease but then appeared in their grandchildren, whose exposure to mercury was miniscule by comparison.
 
post #18 of 114

Also, I wonder why you guys dismiss these studies that show no link to mercury-containing vaccines and autism? 

 


1.  Thomas Verstraeten, Robert L. Davis, Frank DeStefano, Tracy A. Lieu, Philip H. Rhodes, Steven B. Black, Henry Shinefield, and Robert T. Chen, “Safety of Thimerosal-Containing Vaccines: A Two-Phased Study of Computerized Health Maintenance Organization Databases,” Pediatrics, 112:1039-1048, 2003

This study found that for all levels of thimerosal exposure, the risk of autism was the same.


2.  Cristofer S. Price,William W. Thompson, Barbara Goodson, Eric S. Weintraub, Lisa A. Croen, Virginia L. Hinrichsen, Michael Marcy, Anne Robertson, Eileen Eriksen, Edwin Lewis, Pilar Bernal, David Shay, Robert L. Davis, Frank DeStefano, “Prenatal and Infant Exposure to Thimerosal From Vaccines and Immunoglobulins and Risk of Autism,” Pediatrics 126:656-664, 2010

This study found that the level of thimerosal exposure was not related to whether or not the child was autistic.


3.  William W. Thompson, Cristofer Price, Barbara Goodson, David K. Shay, Patti Benson, Virginia L. Hinrichsen, Edwin Lewis, Eileen Eriksen, Paula Ray, S. Michael Marcy, John Dunn, Lisa A. Jackson, Tracy A. Lieu, Steve Black, Gerrie Stewart, Eric S. Weintraub, Robert L. Davis, and Frank DeStefano, "Early Thimerosal Exposure and Neuropsychological Outcomes at 7 to 10 Years," NEJM, 357:1281-1292, 2007

This study assessed on 42 neurological outcomes.  Thimerosal exposure produced a weak benefit in 12 assessments, a weak negative effect in 8 assessments, and had no effect on 22.  One of the original members of the team, Sallie Bernard of SAFEMINDS (an anti-vaccination group), stayed with the study until its results were determined.  Then she dropped, because she didn't like the outcome.


Before you raise the typical conspiracy theory that these researchers are shills for the Almighty Pharma Companies, please note that Frank DeStefano, Tracy A. Lieu, Steven B. Black, and Robert T. Chen appear in one or more of the studies posted above.  They were all on the paper that caused the old rotavirus vaccine to be pulled from the market, which cost the Almighty Pharma Companies millions of dollars:

Kramarz P, France EK, Destefano F, Black SB, Shinefield H, Ward JI, Chang EJ, Chen RT, Shatin D, Hill J, Lieu T, and Ogren JM., "Population-based study of rotavirus vaccination and intussusception," Pediatr Infect Dis J. 20(4):410-6, 2001.
 

Clearly they are not shills for Almighty Pharma, since they ended up costing them a lot of money back in 2000.

post #19 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
 

 

Not necessarily. 

 

I read that study a while ago and there are LOTS of problems with it.  First, the response rate to their survey was only 23%.  Why is that important?  When dealing with surveys, there is something called "response bias."  People tend to invest time and energy into completing and returning a survey if they think it is important.  If someone has an "axe to grind" about getting pink disease, he or she is more likely to fill out and return such a survey.  Now, if the response rate is high, response bias isn't likely to be a factor (either that, or everyone has an axe to grind).  When response rate is low, response bias is a real issue.
 
I will double check this, or see if there is any other studies on Pinks disease and autism.   A 23% response rate is an issue.
 

Second (and more importantly), the diagnosis of ASD was not confirmed.  It was simply reported by the person filling out the survey.  Now remember, the respondents had to be old, because teething power was discontinued a long time ago.  So the researchers were taking the word of an older person that his or her grandchildren had ASD.  Do these grandparents understand ASD well enough (and know their grandchildren well enough) to know that's the diagnosis?  How many grandparents, for example, confuse ADHD with ASD?  How many grandparents don't care what the doctors say and come up with their own diagnosis?

 

I disagree.  Lots of studies use parental reports.   BTW - my mother ( a grandmother) knows exactly what autism is.  The only people, I find, who do not know what autism is are those not well acquainted with it.  
 

Third (and even more importantly), why don't the grandparents have ASD?  Remember, they are the ones with the REAL mercury exposure.  The mercury in vaccines is miniscule compared to the mercury in teething powders. They were exposed to enough mercury to get pink disease, but magically, they didn't get ASD.  Remember, this whole paper supposedly shows it's about genetic predisposition.  They had the genetic predisposition, or they wouldn't have been able to pass it on to their grandchildren.  Why don't THEY have ASD?  Epigenetics, perhaps?  Alternately, autism has numerous environmental triggers.  There is not necessarily one thing that causes autism, it might just be environmental input overload in a susceptible individual.  
 
 
 

Edited by kathymuggle - 10/25/13 at 5:46pm
post #20 of 114

Ok, I did a little more digging.  The 23% is correct.  I am not sure this is overly low for as a mail out survey, but I can agree it has limitations.  

 

Here is one quote on how they tried to minimize bias:

 

"In order to minimize response bias, the true purpose of the study was not included on recruitment materials sent out to potential participants; instead, recruitment materials indicated that the purpose of the study was to investigate the general health outcomes of the descendants of pink disease survivors."

 

The gap between the pink survivor rate of ASD and the general public in grandchildren at the time of the study ( 1/25 versus 1/160) was so high that even if everyone who did not return the survey did not have ASD in their family (quite doubtful) ASD would still be more common in Pink Survivors.

 

Around 525 people returned the survey.  The ASD rate among grandchildren of those who return the survey was 1/25.  For ease of math, let's assume everyone was talking about one offspring (obviously not the case, but assuming one per general public and one per Pink Disease survivors makes it easy ).

 

1/25 out of 525 is 21.  21 cases of ASD out of the 2300 survey sent out is a rate of 1/110 (ish) .  The general rate for the public at the time was 1/160.  

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