or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Vaccinations Debate › "Setting the record straight, debunking ALL the flu vaccine myths"
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"Setting the record straight, debunking ALL the flu vaccine myths" - Page 2

post #21 of 31
Oh, totally agree. I'm just pointing out that the CDCs own statements about lack of evidence etc is not surprising to me
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by EineMutti View Post
 

There is one big problem with the flu jab that shouldn't be overlooked. Many people claim after going into the Dr Office and receiving it, they are sick. Really sick, not just a bit unwell. 

 

Well, in our surgery here you receive the jabs, there is ONE waiting room. It is hot and stuffy. There is no hand gel for disinfecting. People there are sick, mixed with people who want a jab. They sit together, wait for ages, use the toilets, talk to each other and cough on each other and spread their tummybugs. 

 

No wonder people are sick a few days after, no wonder they blame the jab. 

 

I am DREADING going there! 

Yanno, I never thought about that, but that's a good argument for getting them at the pharmacy as is increasingly popular here (don't know if you do that where you are). Typically people waiting at the pharmacy are not there for as long and mostly aren't sick. You would think a pharmacy waiting room would be full of sick people too, but that has not been my experience. I estimate >90% of the people I deal with in any given day are not acutely ill. 

 

Sorry, sort of off topic. 

post #23 of 31

No, our chemists don't do them here. And you are right, a pharmacy isn't full of sick people, here, most people go in for repeat prescriptions. Never caught anything in a pharmacy, but have in a waiting room for the doc. Ped does vaccinations for all ages, but same scenario there. It is SO irresponsible! All those plastic toys that the healthy and the sick kids share and suck on, the seats so close together, the heat, it's so full there, always. I know from when DS was sick, the stuff you had to do to keep the bugs from him. Including cleaning the door handles all the time, the taps, the toilet flush, that just doesn't happen in a surgery. There are no precautions at all. 

 

It was even worse in Germany, because DS was younger and wanted to join in with the all the coughing and vomiting kids and play together. There is no other place, not even a hospital, where there are so many bugs in one room. At nursery or school, sick kids are kept away, at work it is the same. Just at the doctor's they have to congregate. 

 

This is "anecdotal", I know, but it is also common sense and maybe worth looking into?

post #24 of 31

Anecdotal, but my ped in Germany has separate waiting rooms (sick vs. healthy, and if you think they are really contagious like mumps, you call ahead and are let in through a back entrance directly to the exam room). It's still like that where my family lives. I have never seen that in the US. Always one big room with toys for the sick kids to mingle with the non-sick kids. In our new town here I saw advertisements about the novelty of having sick entrances at some peds.

post #25 of 31

The ped we used to see as kids had separate waiting rooms for sick and well kids. Of course, the drawback there is that if your kid comes in with a cold they could pick up a GI bug to go with it, or whatever. Really it seems like it would make more sense to room sick patients right away. Our current doc doesn't have sick waiting rooms, but she is a family practice doc, not a pediatrician, so most of the people in the waiting room at any given moment are adults who don't appear to be acutely ill. I'm not too worried about my daughter catching anything from a 50 yo lady who is there for a refill of her diabetes medicine. 

post #26 of 31
In the UK, GPs often schedule vaccinations in a clinic - meaning at that time all appointments (except emergencies) are for vaccinations. Seems like a good idea. smile.gif
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by nia82 View Post
 

Anecdotal, but my ped in Germany has separate waiting rooms (sick vs. healthy, and if you think they are really contagious like mumps, you call ahead and are let in through a back entrance directly to the exam room). It's still like that where my family lives. I have never seen that in the US. Always one big room with toys for the sick kids to mingle with the non-sick kids. In our new town here I saw advertisements about the novelty of having sick entrances at some peds.

I have had a separate room and separate "well" rooms with my child's ped for over 20+ years here in the US

 

many GP's in my area also have separate areas too, starting to be more common

 

my pharmacies are "germ factories" - filled this time of year with many throughout  the store self medicating and spreading germs as the look for over the counter meds and the pharmacy section of the pharmacies also take non-pharmacy items to be rung up, so just as many sick people there too - many come straight from the Dr office to get their scripts filled

post #28 of 31
In Australia many (possibly most) kids get their vaccines at clinics run by Child Health Nurses which hard held in Community Health Centres. CHCs are resources for chronic health problems and health promotion activities so not usually a gathering place for the acutely ill and infectious.
post #29 of 31

Canada here.  

 

I have lived in 2 provinces with kids.  In British Columbia, vaccines were given by public health nurses, typically at well baby clinics.

 

In Ontario, most kids seem to get their shots at the doctors office, and there is no separate waiting room (I have never seen a separate waiting room in my life, but think it is a fantastic idea!).  Some get them at well baby clinics.  

post #30 of 31

OT- but I will also ads, my Ped suggests that new borns be seen first apts and if your child is sick they can't get in until 9AM when they open for the rest, and you would have had to call to get in, so first visits of the day are for routine visits, well, physicals, follow up, etc - you can make it later but first it's cleaner

 

20+ years ago he was in with a physiologist and the when you came in you had two sections to sit in, years later he had his own office and simply expanded on two waiting rooms, two sets of toys and two sets of exam rooms

 

years ago (since I am old and even dealt with a Dr visiting you at home) my town Dr (prior to peds even) a GP had two doors, one for "sick" one for not, and you sat in his living room and waited to be seen and dealt with his wife before seeing him, he only had one exam room but kept people separated 

 

and even with the Ped I had 20 years ago and still use, with some things (like chicken pox) you didn't even go, colds you didn't even go for a visit, he still answers your questions over the phone prior to having a "sick" visit, to see that you really needed to be seen

post #31 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratchet View Post

Oh, totally agree. I'm just pointing out that the CDCs own statements about lack of evidence etc is not surprising to me

 



I'm not surprised, either, and I totally get what you're saying.

This being the case, the blogger has no business using such absolutist rhetoric about how pregnant women just HAVE to get vaccinated. Where there are still unknowns, pregnant women should be informed of these unknowns and have the freedom to choose accordingly. My pregnant friend's employer, a major hospital, didn't give her this choice. irked.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Vaccinations Debate
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Vaccinations Debate › "Setting the record straight, debunking ALL the flu vaccine myths"