or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Bump after 4 month vaccines.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bump after 4 month vaccines.

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
My daughter had her second set of vaccinations at her four month appointment a couple weeks ago. So far we are vaccinating as recommended by western pediatrician. She had a high fever the first night, and the next day a low fever and fussy and in pain. The pain lasted at least a week, and now it's been two weeks. The bruises are faded almost fine but underneath she still has a knot on her thigh where she had two of the shots. Should I be worried? Anyone else experience this? Should we space out the vaccinations ? I am on the fence about vaccinations in general, but it is important to my wife.
post #2 of 11

I have dealt with this with my children a while back. Some ice packs should help if it still bothers her. Maybe some others here on Mothering could offer some wise advice. 

post #3 of 11
We had this with our sons second dtap. It was huge. French green clay helped us. Stay away from Tylenol which is the thing the doc told us. We didn't as it doesn't address the issue. Clay powder mixed with water or yea (chamomile is nice) applied to the knot and then put a bandage over it is it won't come off. Worked like a charm.
post #4 of 11
The bump is a normal response and not considered a reaction. It does occur due to the aluminum in the vaccine which causes a local immune response. A bunch of immune cells cluster in the area. This is good in the sense that it kind of sequesters the antigenic portion of the vaccine, which encouraged the body to make antibodies against it. Otherwise, our primary immune response is too good at eliminating the antigens and there is no antibody response - which is the whole point.

It can take a long time for the bump to go away. Weeks to months, but it's not an allergic reaction if that's what you're wondering.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwill View Post

The bump is a normal response and not considered a reaction. It does occur due to the aluminum in the vaccine which causes a local immune response. A bunch of immune cells cluster in the area. This is good in the sense that it kind of sequesters the antigenic portion of the vaccine, which encouraged the body to make antibodies against it. Otherwise, our primary immune response is too good at eliminating the antigens and there is no antibody response - which is the whole point.

It can take a long time for the bump to go away. Weeks to months, but it's not an allergic reaction if that's what you're wondering.

…and people like to pretend there is no difference between injection and injestion.  I can't remember the last time I had a long term bump from eating something with aluminum in it…..


Edited by kathymuggle - 11/28/13 at 4:54am
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post
 

…and people like to pretend there is no difference between injection and injestion.  I can't remeber the last time I had a long term bump from eating something with aluminum in it…..


Well, the Al is absorbed in your small intestine and colon.  You probably wouldn't notice a bump there. 

post #7 of 11

Sounds like the reaction ds had to a vaccine (the bump, not the fever); don't really remember which one at this point (maybe the 4th DTaP?), but the bump lasted for a while.  I've also wondered if it matters how the injection is done...I've noticed that with some nurses, my sons hardly notice they've had a shot and there's nothing like a bump. But with others, it seems the nurse doesn't have such a gentle hand, and the shot is more painful and there's more of a localized reaction afterwards.  I guess it could also be the specific composition of the shot as we've moved around and visited different pediatricians.  

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwill View Post
 


Well, the Al is absorbed in your small intestine and colon.  You probably wouldn't notice a bump there. 

I am going to assume there isn't one, unless proven otherwise.  

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmk1 View Post
 

Sounds like the reaction ds had to a vaccine (the bump, not the fever); don't really remember which one at this point (maybe the 4th DTaP?), but the bump lasted for a while.  I've also wondered if it matters how the injection is done...I've noticed that with some nurses, my sons hardly notice they've had a shot and there's nothing like a bump. But with others, it seems the nurse doesn't have such a gentle hand, and the shot is more painful and there's more of a localized reaction afterwards.  I guess it could also be the specific composition of the shot as we've moved around and visited different pediatricians.  

 

Yeah, the bump is more likely to form with one of the aluminum adjuvants than the other so it can depend on the make up of the vaccine  But it can also depend on where the shot gets placed in the arm or leg.  You might not necessarily notice it because it's deep in the muscle.  And if the nurse causes physical damage when s/he gives the shot, it makes sense that there could be more immune cell recruitment to the site...

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwill View Post
 

 

Yeah, the bump is more likely to form with one of the aluminum adjuvants than the other so it can depend on the make up of the vaccine  But it can also depend on where the shot gets placed in the arm or leg.  You might not necessarily notice it because it's deep in the muscle.  And if the nurse causes physical damage when s/he gives the shot, it makes sense that there could be more immune cell recruitment to the site...

I also noticed that one of my kids gets little bumps (almost like goosebumps) that are very different from the hard bump that's under the skin.  It seemed like he stopped getting them after shots, but the last DTaP he got them again.  I had thought he'd grown out of it until it happened again.  I was almost wondering if that's like eczema or something similar...but it spread on the one leg down from the injection site.  Lasted probably for a week or 2.  It didn't seem to bother him at all, but his skin felt all bumpy on that leg.  Now, I wonder if that's related to the aluminum as well?  Which adjuvant causes less of a reaction?  

post #11 of 11

Man, I don't know.  Aluminum phosphate is less likely to cause the bump, but it kind of sounds like your son is having more of a local allergic reaction.  If that's the case, it seems like it could have been any of the components.  Was that the only shot he got in that leg?  Was it just the DTaP or was it a combo?  I know eggs, latex, and gelatin are common allergens in vaccines.  Some of the DTaPs have latex stoppers, but I don't think any of them have the others.  You could mention it to his ped when you go again.  Sorry I can't be more helpful.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Vaccinations
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Bump after 4 month vaccines.