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New to thinking about puberty. Advice please

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone,

 

I've never visited this forum so I hope you don't mind me just jumping in. I have two daughters dd1 is 9 and dd2 is 5. DD1 is very interested in the human body. I'm a midwife and have always been very open with her about sex and babies etc (she has known how babies were made since she asked me, probing for detail after detail, when she was 4) I bought her a book about reproduction last christmas which she has read many times and often asks me questions about. Its a science based book and covers puberty a little but not in much depth. 

 

I've been looking for a book for her to read on her own (I'll be available for discussion, of course, but I want her to feel free to read it at her own pace) That covers the changes to her body over the coming years but also talks about her emotions, friendships, body image, self-esteem etc. I want something that has a feminist angle, or at least something that doesn't have an emphasis on looking good (one book i looked at said something about how puberty will turn her into a 'babe' and she will look better in her jeans!! - this is NOT the kind of book I'm looking for!) Also, I'm a single parent so I want something that doesn't emphasis two parent families as being the ideal

 

Does anyone have any recommendations? I know its a bit specific! 

 

Also, I use a moon cup. Does anyone have experience of their young daughters using 'green' sanitary products

 

Thanks everyone

 

Kirsty x

post #2 of 12
"It's perfectly normal" by robie Harris is an amazing book. I've read another of her books so I'm not sure if it's in this one or the other but there is discussion of families that don't look the same: single parent, gay parents, adopted, raised by grandparents, etc.
Edited by OceanSolitude - 11/13/13 at 6:20pm
post #3 of 12

Our Bodies, Ourselves is a great feminist book on the female body and woman's body and reproductive issues. I always have a new copy on our coffee table or where ever the kids can read it. I've lost more copies to "borrowing" from my friends or my kid's friends than any other book.

post #4 of 12
Growing Up It's A Girl Thing was dd's favorite for a long time. She also likes the American Girl book that includes this subject. We took a class from Planned Parenthood that we both liked.
post #5 of 12

All of my friends - from super crunchy to full-on Disney mamas - have recommended the American Girl book, The Care and Keeping of You.  My friends who work in bookstores say they can't keep it on the shelves. 

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by OceanSolitude View Post

"It's perfectly normal" by robie Harris is an amazing book. I've read another of his books so I'm not sure if it's in this one or the other but there is discussion of families that don't look the same: single parent, gay parents, adopted, raised by grandparents, etc.

Yes, for your 9 year old and the other two for your 5 year old and maybe even for your 9 year old to review. They are called, "It's not the Stork" and "It's so Amazing". All three are GREAT books for this age group! 

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by NiteNicole View Post
 

All of my friends - from super crunchy to full-on Disney mamas - have recommended the American Girl book, The Care and Keeping of You.  

And, I also like these. Not quite as much as the Robbie Harris books but I think the AGD books are surprisingly good. I'll admit that I was rather surprised to see an illustration of the vulva in and American Girl book. :rotflmao 

post #8 of 12

suggestions here since at 10 dd started her periods and she learnt the facts of life through questions at 4 too. 

 

make her her own book.

 

dd read all those books but nothing prepared her for the first time. 

 

the topics i would cover are - the kind of blood u would find on your panty. 

 

how to clean yourself. 

 

how the period usually flows and the change in the look and feel and colour of blood. how there are heavy days and light days.

 

how breast buds, then maybe some emotional changes before bleeding happens. 

 

what are the choices available to use.

 

cramps, discomfort, what are the things good for those times.

 

what happens afterwards. really details. all these are based on 'mom i wish you had told me that' statements dd made.  

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirstyandgirls View Post
 

Also, I use a moon cup. Does anyone have experience of their young daughters using 'green' sanitary products

 

I bought tampons, disposable pads, and cloth pads for my daughter and she much prefers using cloth pads (I also use cloth pads so she probably sees them as the "normal", but I made sure she knew she was welcome to choose anything she wanted and I'd make sure she had supplies).

post #10 of 12

I've thought about what DC will like to use. My assumption is that a cup will be really intimidating for a young girl. I know a lot of women who have had babies even who don't feel comfortable using a cup. I happen to LOVE my Diva cup but it's a lot of digging around, if you know what I mean. ;-)  I assume my DC will use a pad for while, like I did when I was young. 

post #11 of 12

My 15 year old really wants to use a cup (I love mine and have used one since before she was born), and we researched and found the smallest, softest one we could - and she still can't get it in no matter what she tries. She's not worried about the mess and is very in touch with her body, but her teenage body is just not flexible enough for a cup yet. (Maybe in a few years after she becomes sexually active it will be easier?) But every person's body is different and if your dd expresses interest, maybe it will be right for her. I'd say to let her get a year or so of periods under her belt first since it can be so random and weird for at least a year or two after starting.

My dd doesn't love tampons but uses them for swimming and a few other activities. She likes cloth pads but not when she's out and about for long periods (doesn't want to carry a wet bag/store them), so we do disposable pads when we're out.

 

Oh, and we liked "The Care and Keeping of You."

post #12 of 12

My daughter really likes "The Care and Keeping of You."  My daughter read it for the first time last fall when she was nine.

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