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Mothering › Groups › June 2014 Due Date Club › Discussions › Anyone not planning on getting an ultra sound?

Anyone not planning on getting an ultra sound?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hello ladies,

This is my first pregnancy and would love to hear other women's responses on ultra sounds and dopplers. From what I've been reading , it seems as though they have become standard procedure for every woman instead of high risk women. I told my midwife in our first conversation about my thoughts and she agreed. She it's all about what you would do with the information received.

I guess I'm just wondering who else feels a bit like an ultra sound and a Doppler ( which apparently is even worse) are invasive. I'm still considering the 20 week one, and I want some pros and cons from some other mums that has experiences this before.

As a first time mother and doula. I don't want to live in fear, I want to trust that my baby is cooking along just fine without being worried about what we may see on a screen.

Love and light to all our babies.
post #2 of 17

I have decided to only do the 20w ultrasound and one doppler then I'm having them use a fetoscope. They also require doppler for the first 10 min of labor and then a couple of minutes every 30 min during labor. I'm not a huge fan of this but other than that I love the care I am getting... so I am compromising.

 

http://chriskresser.com/natural-childbirth-iib-ultrasound-not-as-safe-as-commonly-thought

 

I honestly do want that 20w ultrasound to see if there are any major problems we need to be aware of and to find out the sex.

post #3 of 17

With our first (and this one probably) we elected to do the 20 week anatomy ultrasound, and had (and have this time) no plans for others. Several reasons- First, I have a -need- to know the sex so I can plan. More importantly though, we decline genetic screening, but if there were some major issues that would be detectable before birth, I would want to know (ie something that would be shocking at the birth). Also, I want to check placental position, as we're hoping for a homebirth. 

post #4 of 17

This is my third pregnancy, and I have never had an ultrasound or doppler. I would not have one unless we suspected that something was wrong and wanted to double check. There's a much greater chance of a false alarm, bringing with it huge amounts of stress and worry, than there is of a true positive. And as far as placental placement goes, the placenta migrates during pregnancy, so a previa at 20 weeks is almost always in a normal position by term. I don't need all that worry. As long as the pregnancy is proceeding normally, for me, it just makes sense to steer clear.

post #5 of 17
I did no ultrasounds for my first pregnancy and doppler only during labor. I completely agree with Gratefulgoddess and redeyedvireo that it was not worth the anxiety.

Since then, I have had 3 missed miscarriages and been diagnosed with a syndrome which makes my risk for miscarriage much, much higher. Due to those circumstances, I have made the decision to have a single ultrasound around 8 weeks to check for viability. I also own a home doppler which I make use of as needed from 10-20 weeks, until I can feel baby moving regularly. I have found that these uses of the technology reduce anxiety rather than increasing it and I am willing to accept whatever risks might be associated with that for some peace of mind and ability to connect to the baby earlier. This is just what I have found to work for me. I do not expect that all women who have experienced pregnancy losses will come to the same conclusion.
post #6 of 17
Zero ultrasounds or dopplers here too. There's another thread on here with a link from a study talking about they change the cell structures. I've read so much controversial stuff about ultrasounds in the past 10 years, I would only ever do it if something seemed very very wrong withthe pregnancy and confirmation of viability or something like that had to be done.

In my first pg we didn't know any better until later in pg. So we had the 20 w us and Doppler use. With #2 &3, none. With #4, I had 2 miscarriages between her and #3 and had severe cramping at 9 1/2 weeks. I thought I was miscarrying again so they did a quick abdominal viability check and that was it. No others. Don't plan on doing either with this pg as well.
post #7 of 17

I didn't have any u/s during my 1st or 2nd pregnancy (homebirths). Fetoscope was used as soon as it would detect the h/b, so minimal doppler too.

 

The CNM/hospital birth I used for my 3rd pregnancy insisted on a 20w u/s to stay with her practice. I ended up having another one while bleeding at 12w. And doppler was used to check the h/b during visits.

 

I'm on pregnancy #4 and will admit that I'll end up with more u/s this time because we are considering genetic screening.

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Activia View Post
 

I have decided to only do the 20w ultrasound and one doppler then I'm having them use a fetoscope. They also require doppler for the first 10 min of labor and then a couple of minutes every 30 min during labor. I'm not a huge fan of this but other than that I love the care I am getting... so I am compromising.

 

http://chriskresser.com/natural-childbirth-iib-ultrasound-not-as-safe-as-commonly-thought

 

I honestly do want that 20w ultrasound to see if there are any major problems we need to be aware of and to find out the sex.

Just read that article you posting. Wow, it is really enlightening. Thank you. I am having my first appointment with my midwife on Friday and I don't know what will be done. Is there a safe way to hear the heartbeat without a Doppler? I just want confirmation that my baby is okay without being invasive or risking complications with the technology used.

post #9 of 17

For me, I'm a nervous wreck until I hear the heartbeat for the first time, so using a dopler for 30 seconds here and there during my pregnancy is worth it, but I am going to ask about using a fetoscope once we can use it. And after having a baby go into distress during labor (a cytotec induction), I'm fine with some checking during labor to make sure the baby is handling the contractions well. As far as the 20 week ultrasound goes, I've had false positives during both of my previous pregnancies. One of them I ended going back in for multiple ultrasounds because she had a freakishly large stomach and they wanted to make sure there weren't any blockages or digestion issues, and my dd even had an ultrasound after she was born to make sure everything was good. The second one freaked me out a bit since it was a marker for down's, but Dr. Google said everything would most likely be okay, so I chose not to return for follow-up ultrasounds.

 

This time I'm going to do genetic testing, but I'm still not certain about doing an ultrasound. I probably will, but I'll ask my tech up front to limit the time to about 15 minutes and just check the most important things. If they ask me to do any follow-up, then I may or may not go back depending on what the issue is.

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Water Mama View Post
 

Just read that article you posting. Wow, it is really enlightening. Thank you. I am having my first appointment with my midwife on Friday and I don't know what will be done. Is there a safe way to hear the heartbeat without a Doppler? I just want confirmation that my baby is okay without being invasive or risking complications with the technology used.

A Fetoscope is the only way. This can be done from about 18-20 weeks.

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
I totally agree to all these things. So another question I have is- if they found something wrong in an ultra sound- technically what could they do? Would they be able to help the baby? If it did have an enlargerd stomach or anything else- what could they really do?

I've had some spotting this pregnancy. But when I think about what an u/s is going to say either- yes you will miscarry, which would have happened anyway or no all is fine. I guess I just want to be at peace with whatever option without learning about it from a machine.

But I really like these responses and I can really see how an ultra sound would give you peace of mind.
post #12 of 17

In my case the follow-up wasn't because they could do something in utero, but because it was an indication my child could have had problems processing food after birth. It's better to be aware of those types of problems before you fill them up with milk and discover it doesn't have anywhere to go. She probably would have gone for surgery before her first nursing session.

post #13 of 17

It is not so much that they can do anything before the baby is born but right after.  For instance, heart defects are much more common than many people realize.  It is MUCH better to know if there is a problem at birth than being surprised by a baby turning blue a few hours later (personal experience.)  Much better to have medical staff on board and deliver in a place where the baby can live.  There are other birth defects that can be seen on ultrasound and prepared for as well.

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks. And because I'm in the running to have a home birth, it would be good to see if baby needed treatment right after birth. Thanks lady!

@Earthylady- what is an abdominal viability check?
post #15 of 17

Being surrounded by loss lately I've chosen to try the doppler once around 12 weeks to see if we can hear a hb before sharing out news with the family on Christmas. After this it will be only fetoscope until I'm in labor. My midwife has used the doppler very sparingly in the past while I was in labor so I didn't have to get out of the tub (like 1-2 times). I felt like at that stage of the game it was a small concession to make with the bigger goal in mind. 

 

I'll also do the 20 week ultrasound but I've learned when scheduling to ask for the most experienced tech they have. Also to tell the tech I want an intermittent survey, not the wand left of my belly the whole time while he/she adjusts pictures and types stuff on the computer. I've also been close to families who have lost little ones due to different birth defects and other who have dealt with major heart issues. Because of these things and my desire for a homebirth, I want to know ahead of time if we need to prepare for any special situations for baby's sake. :) 

 

That being said I'm all for doing whatever you feel is best for your family! 

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by BethaniaDawn View Post
 

It is not so much that they can do anything before the baby is born but right after.  For instance, heart defects are much more common than many people realize.  It is MUCH better to know if there is a problem at birth than being surprised by a baby turning blue a few hours later (personal experience.)  Much better to have medical staff on board and deliver in a place where the baby can live.  There are other birth defects that can be seen on ultrasound and prepared for as well.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dandy Lion View Post
 

In my case the follow-up wasn't because they could do something in utero, but because it was an indication my child could have had problems processing food after birth. It's better to be aware of those types of problems before you fill them up with milk and discover it doesn't have anywhere to go. She probably would have gone for surgery before her first nursing session.

 

^^^Yes that basically sums it up. I have a friend whose daughter was born with a severe heart condition which should have been caught on ultrasound, and because it wasn't, they were -very- lucky to catch it by fluke afterwards while the nurse was doing a check that isn't standard. Otherwise baby would likely have been sent home and become very sick very quickly, and probably not made it. 

 

But yeah, mostly it stems from my desire to have a homebirth (and last time there was a chance of a UC), and wanting to know that I truly am a "low risk" pregnancy, and not in need of the higher interventions. I know not everyone worries about that, but for me, it's part of making sure that my plans are safe and in the best interests of all of us. I wouldn't feel comfortable homebirthing without a little bit more assurance that everything was alright with baby and I. And with the placenta too, yes it can move up, but it's very rare for it to move -down-, so if it's fine at 20 weeks, it's almost certain to be fine at the birth, kwim? 

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gratefulgoddess View Post

Thanks. And because I'm in the running to have a home birth, it would be good to see if baby needed treatment right after birth. Thanks lady!

@Earthylady- what is an abdominal viability check?

 

It's the abdominal ultrasound (as opposed to a vaginal) where they just look real quick to see if there is a heartbeat, and nothing else.  It's like, less than 2 minutes and done.

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