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Book review from ignorant man - Page 3

post #41 of 55
tinyshoes, i also thank you for your post.

lest we forget in our technocratic culture, vaginas *were* made to birth babies--at least as long as we take a stand for mothers, babies and normal birth!

post #42 of 55
Quote:
... by Mothra
... This is one of the reasons why I refuse to have male ob/gyns. I KNOW that not all of them think this way, but it is a risk I'm not willing to take ...

My OB (whom we like a lot) put it this way: Men become OB/GYNs either because they absolutely love women, or because they absolutely loathe women ... or because they want to become women.

post #43 of 55
I am about half way through the book "Every since I had my baby". Here the amazon link for it. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...ance&s=booksIt written by a male ob. It talks at great length about pelvic floor concerns and incontinence. This author says woman with vaginal births have more issues with pelvic floor concerns, but especially if they have vacuum extractions or forcep deliveries. He said c-sections might be a tool to avoid that except that right now there is no way to determine who is at highest risk beforehand to pelvis floor problems. I thought the book was pretty balanced unlike the bonehead who wrote that review.
post #44 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyshoes
If I had to choose between my Worst Nightmare of a Vaginal Hospital Birth and a Standard Cesarian Birth, I'm not sure which I'd pick...I'm truly not sure......because a cesarian birth is surgical, but what happens to many vaginal birthers in hosptials these days is dehumanizing.
After experiencing both, I'd have to agree -- talk about your hell and a hard place choice. In the end, I opted out of the whole hospital birth thing, had my son at home, and never looked back. It seemed pointless to put myself at that level of risk of medical assault with so miniscule a chance of any of it being necessary.


Quote:
The other reason is, by KEGELING, things are snappy, sassy, and happy in my neitherregions.
Oh, I so agree. Kegels are the bomb. Also, I think way too many people blame common aging issues on pregnancy & childbirth. You'd think childless women never ever suffer from incontinence or flabby abs. According to that f'wittage, if I never had kids, I'd have the same tightness I had in middleschool AND still be wearing size 7/8 jeans. Please. By the time I was 30, I could already tell the difference in tightness made by only 10 yrs of regular sex. That's when I got into researching kegels and discovered a very obvious truth: that there is no muscle in your human body that is immune to aging and atrophy, and that would of course include your vaginal and pelvic floor muscles, not to mention your glutes and abs. Bottom line is if you want a muscle to stay toned, you have to tone it. Duh.
post #45 of 55
Thread Starter 
Yes, what about incontinence in men? What explains that? I think with women, we've just found a convenient thing to blame it on.
post #46 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greaseball
Men, being men, generally don't feel comfortable enough to discuss this with their partners if it's a problem. Instead, they'll often look for a greener (can I say tighter?) pasture."
This guy is a PIG and he makes me SICK. :Puke
post #47 of 55
"This author says woman with vaginal births have more issues with pelvic floor concerns, but especially if they have vacuum extractions or forcep deliveries. He said c-sections might be a tool to avoid that except that right now there is no way to determine who is at highest risk beforehand to pelvis floor problems."

I'd say there is a way to know who is at highest risk -- it's whoever gives birth under the traditional obstetrical model of birth management. (Which unfortunately some midwives subscribe to as well.) I'm curious if the author talks about avoiding a managed second stage as a preventative measure? Does he distinguish between unmanaged birth and managed birth (not just instrumental vaginal birth) at all?
post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueviolet
I'd say there is a way to know who is at highest risk -- it's whoever gives birth under the traditional obstetrical model of birth management. (Which unfortunately some midwives subscribe to as well.) I'm curious if the author talks about avoiding a managed second stage as a preventative measure? Does he distinguish between unmanaged birth and managed birth (not just instrumental vaginal birth) at all?
Well, blueviolet, I can't speak for the author of the book review, and I share your interest in seeing some compare & contrasts of natural, unmanaged births versus typical meddled-with hospital tomfoolery. I just came across an article that I thought was pertanant to this discussion.

The article Vaginal Delivery Affects Pelvic Organ Support published on March 1, 2004 in the periodical American Family Physician describes a study of 200 Australian women, and their pelvic floors: "Dietz and Bennett used a prospective observational study to document the effects of childbirth-related trauma on pelvic support structures in nulliparous women."

Researchers studied the motility of pregnant women's urethra, bladder, cervix, and rectal ampulla (I guess that's the butt, hunh?) during early pregnancy, late pregnancy, and after birth.

It is interesting that every woman had increased mobility (i.e., when bearing down, the bladder decended, thus indicating a weakness, or slackening, or change, however you want to describe it) during the last portion of her pregnancy. This clearly indicates that by virtue of being pregnant, a woman's body will change.

Quote:
Cesarean delivery before the onset of labor was associated with an average reduction in bladder neck descent of 2.27 mm, whereas all other forms of delivery were associated with increases ranging from an average of 2.63 mm for stage 1 cesarean delivery to 14.49 mm for forceps delivery.
I'd like to know the numbers for non-instrumental vaginal (yes, evil hospital managed vaginal) delivery, too, but they're not included. The authors include a note that
Quote:
at least one study indicates that by age 50, women have the same rate of urinary incontinence regardless of delivery mode, and some nulliparous women also develop incontinence with age.
and

Quote:
Certainly, widespread use of elective cesarean delivery seems excessive for the estimated 5 to 10 percent reduction in risk of moderate to severe incontinence, especially when weight control and pelvic floor exercises offer alternative means of risk reduction
post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by merpk
My OB (whom we like a lot) put it this way: Men become OB/GYNs either because they absolutely love women, or because they absolutely loathe women ... or because they want to become women.

That's pretty much the same thing that my (male) ob/gyn friend told me. Something he told me that was even scarier was that a lot of men, more than women, don't make it through their residency, or whatever, because their hatred/envy of women is apparent. More women in administration=good thing.
post #50 of 55
oh, gross.

let me get this straight-- this guy believes that every woman should have every baby via major abdominal surgery in order to-- hold on, let me think how to word this-- in order to keep her husband's sexual interest?

man, that's weak.
post #51 of 55

Just reading while I kegel...
post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by copslass

Just reading while I kegel...
Hee, hee ....me too!
post #53 of 55
FWIW, I recently read that bicycling has the same positive effects as kegels, and my midwife confirmed this. I just went and bought a new helmet

I especially appreciated this because I DO feel looser, and though I try and try to do kegels, I never seem to get it quite right. ATM I am 7 months prego, but for later, how does one go about finding one of these occupational therapists?

And in the meantime, hit the road ladies, it's good for the environment and your sex life!

Rochelle
Mommy to Meg 5/00, Peter 6/02, #3 due 8/04
post #54 of 55
Quote:
I read in Open Season that doctors' wives are the people most likely to get sectioned.
AND doctor's families are subject to more interventions of every possible kind since they truly believe that they are doing every one a BIG favor!

Since obstetricians have been doing 20-25% caesarean sections for the last twenty years, are they doing less surgery for urinary incontinence? I do not believe so, as the above posts conclude.

My DH never had any complaints about me after four vaginal deliveries w/o an episiotomy. Believe me, he would have said something, since he told me everything! Often it was TMI,:
post #55 of 55
Quote:
My OB (whom we like a lot) put it this way: Men become OB/GYNs either because they absolutely love women, or because they absolutely loathe women ... or because they want to become women.
Yes,

...and the best and the brightest in medical school do not go into obstetrics or gynecology. Although the obstetrical rotation during medical school is often the favorite that most doctors recall from medical school, the best and brightest of the interns often go into cardiology and internal medicine since some intelligent, critical thinking is involved. Let me qualify, NOT ALWAYS, but often, the bottom 10% of the graduating medical school class will go into ob/gyn. The odd hours and stress often will weed out the smartest. The reason there aren't more deaths in childbirth from the less qualified doctors is because of antibiotics, blood transfusions, and simply that most women who go on to have a baby are healthy no matter what the hospital does to them and the baby is healthy 90% of the time if it reaches term...the human body strives to live and be healthy often in spite of the abuse it is given.
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