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I want to quit the pacifier.

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Not sure if this belongs in the breastfeeding forum or here, but here goes. I was always anti-paci, but one thing led to another and DS got started on them very early on. I've heard about kids using them at three, four years of age plus, and I definitely don't want that. Would it be possible to quit using it now? If so, should we go cold turkey? Or how should we approach it? How can I convince my husband that this is the right thing to do? Thanks.

post #2 of 10
How old is your baby now? I think the problem with kids using them later is that it affects the alignment of their teeth and such. It is recommended to put a baby to sleep with a paci to reduce SIDS, but the reason why is not entirely clear. Babies can also use them to self-soothe. Does DS use them often?
post #3 of 10
From what I understand the palate shaping takes place the first three to four months of infancy. A young infants palate is so soft even a finger pushed into it will mold it.
An artificial nipple shapes a high narrow arch in the palate whereas a soft nipple of the breast leads to a wide palate, and therefore a wide bite not a narrow one. A narrow one can cause crowding of the teeth as they come in, because there is just less room.
There is a dentist, Brian Palmer, who did a lot of research in this area and his work was published In the Journal of Human lactation.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asiago View Post

From what I understand the palate shaping takes place the first three to four months of infancy. A young infants palate is so soft even a finger pushed into it will mold it.
An artificial nipple shapes a high narrow arch in the palate whereas a soft nipple of the breast leads to a wide palate, and therefore a wide bite not a narrow one. A narrow one can cause crowding of the teeth as they come in, because there is just less room.
There is a dentist, Brian Palmer, who did a lot of research in this area and his work was published In the Journal of Human lactation.[/quote

So it's too late then? :-( I still want to quit. Is it possible to cold turkey it? My son is 4 months old.
post #5 of 10
I don't really know Bayosgirl. It seems most of the shaping takes place early on but maybe if you read some of that dentists research it will help guide you.
My own outlook is that it is rarely ever too late to try, in general. Are you still breastfeeding? Can you offer the breast more when baby has the need to suckle?
post #6 of 10

I agree with Asiago, offer the breast instead of the pacifier. I wouldn't go cold turkey, as it may stress him, but gradually start offering the breast anytime he'd be using the pacifier.

 

Only one of mine took a pacifier, and it was for only about 8 weeks until she learned to control my overactive ejection. (She was nursing and either spitting out the milk or projectile spitting up the excess, so we used a paci for about 2 minutes after 2-3 feeds a day to help her get the sucking in she needed. By 8 weeks we noticed she wasn't spitting up the milk or spitting it out and we just gave up the paci, but she was only using it a total of about 6 minutes or so a day.)

 

Why does your husband want him to have the paci? My DH hated the paci and was happy to get rid of it as I was with that one child who used it. In fact, it was him who noticed she was not really needing it at all anymore. Luckily we had not gotten into the habit of giving it at bedtime (a hard habit to break, but possible, with night nursing being stepped up) and eliminated it pretty easily.  Along with palate shaping, pacifiers can dull hunger and thirst and cause the baby to nurse less. Offering the breast instead of the pacifier is a good solution.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

My DH (and everyone in his family) has a wide jaw and palate thanks to extended breastfeeding and traditional foods and I tried to eat many of these foods regularly during my pregnancy so I'm hoping that might make up for the pacifier mistake. We are trying to get rid of it, but it's challenging, especially with DS' teething in full force. I always offer breast first, but sometimes he won't take it because he's so upset, or he simply doesn't want milk (he'll start sucking and once the milk starts flowing drop the breast and cry.)

post #8 of 10

Both my girls had binkies till 3, and their palates were narrow until they gave them up.  They moved back to a normal size/ shape after they gave them up.  My ds would never take one and I get SOOOO much less sleep with him than I did with my girls.  My dds would still nurse  2-3 times at night up to about 18 months, He is nursing usually every 1-2 hours all night and I think it is because he doesn't take a paci.... I end up being it.  

 

I don't think it would be too traumatic at 4 months, as long as you are giving him the breast each time he is fussing for comfort.  I also don't think it is a big deal to have kids with pacis till 3.... so maybe I am the wrong person to ask.  

post #9 of 10
Have you tried taking him off the breast during the first let down and then using the same breast for several feedings so he can suckle but not become overwhelmed with too much milk? In a short period of time without the pacifier he will learn to control the flow on his own.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggieLC View Post

Have you tried taking him off the breast during the first let down and then using the same breast for several feedings so he can suckle but not become overwhelmed with too much milk? In a short period of time without the pacifier he will learn to control the flow on his own.


Not really. I'll try that next  time.

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