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Does anyone have any natural remedies for wakeful babies? - Page 2

post #21 of 32
Without knowing the age of the baby, I think we can't give proper advice. Further, is the a new issue or something ongoing since birth? Has the kid had any health issues? Has she reached out to her child's pediatrician to make sure everything is ok?
post #22 of 32
Then, assuming this is a normal, healthy infant, my answer is... Boob. Lots and lots of boob.
Also, the book "Bringing Up Bébé" has some sleep advice that isn't common in the US. Give it a once over.
post #23 of 32

When trying to solve baby problems, or indeed, other family dynamics problems, I like to think back to our roots, way back when we were hunter-gatherers. Evolution happens very slowly. We are all basically primitive humans in modern trappings.

 

Women often lived in communal houses with female relatives - mom, sisters, aunts etc. Men had their own houses. The women took care of the babies, nursed them, shared them, slept with them. Primitive moms carried their babies constantly, or handed them off to other women or sisters.

 

So chances are it's some aspect of our modern life that is getting in the way. Babies were designed to sleep with their moms. People went to bed when it got dark. Have you read the recent research about artificial light? It stimulates the pituitary, keeps us awake and suppresses our immune system. Many modern humans are sleep-deprived. Sleep deprivation has even been linked to obesity.

 

I'm not saying you have to become a primitive woman, but just suggesting that what we expect today may be quite a stretch from how we evolved. Some babies obviously will adapt better than others and be more flexible, but others will protest. Society puts pressures on us to ignore our babies' signals. We have to learn to ignore society and try to get to the core of what is happening with our baby. You could even try turning your computer off and night and going to bed earlier.

 

 

post #24 of 32

Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for at least the first 6 months. That means nothing by mouth other than human milk. It is normal for human children to wake and nurse at night until they are 3 or older. I have problems with giving children anything including teas to try and make them sleep for adult preference. Instead of trying to change normal babies why aren't we trying to help women adapt to thriving with night waking?

post #25 of 32
Because being up all night for months and months makes me want coffee all day. But really what would help me adapt and thrive?
post #26 of 32
Farmer Momma, I am right there with ya--it's coffee all day here too. smile.gif
post #27 of 32

MAGNESIUM!!

 

there is a magnesium supplement called "calm" - we had terrible sleep issues with DD - I am sure there are lots of archives with my many posts asking for help.  DD would be awake for 1 or 2 hours several nights a week - she wouldn't cry or want to play, she just would toss and turn and couldn't settle to sleep.  IT also took FOREVER to get her to sleep each time - 45 minutes was average, but it could take up to 90 minutes or more.  SHe would look exhausted and be nursing with her eyes half open but she just couldn't fall asleep.  She didn't start sleeping through the night until she was over 3 YEARS OLD!  I was so sleep deprived for so long.

 

one day i happened to read something about a magnesium deficiency that can cause restless sleep and wakefulness - it said with our modern diet and high calcium intakes via a lot of dairy products magnesium deficiency is becoming more common.

 

we started her on magnesium at a time in our lives when we were going through a HUGE transition (moving to another continent) when her sleep problems would typically get worse (she responded to stress by not sleeping) but for the first time in her life she started sleeping all night.  it was amazing.  we supplemented her for about a year and in that year she only had one or two nights of being awake total, versus 3-5 nights a week.  

 

i also agree with pp about using the boob as much as possible - nursing while lying down allows mom to sleep (or be almost asleep) while baby eats, and realizing that sleep waking is normal (to an extent) - she should make sure there really is an issue and not just normal sleep waking (before I had kids I thought they started sleeping all night around 2-3 months and then would sleep all night from that point on - HA!)

post #28 of 32
My boys loves nap Time but there nap are always more than two hours how can I change that?
post #29 of 32

My boys had reflux when they were babies, so we got the best results when they were sleeping at an incline rather than flat on their backs.  I had this bouncy seat that was lined with sheepskin-like material and we wound up putting them in that seat (buckled in of course) inside the crib.  Helped them sleep quite a bit.  ~~The pediatrician was fine with it; I checked with her first.  Just sharing what we did, not recommending it per se. 

post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverinbluejeans View Post

Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for at least the first 6 months. That means nothing by mouth other than human milk. It is normal for human children to wake and nurse at night until they are 3 or older. I have problems with giving children anything including teas to try and make them sleep for adult preference. Instead of trying to change normal babies why aren't we trying to help women adapt to thriving with night waking?

Perhaps you could steep some chamomile in breast milk to avoid the negligible amount of water? Haha. That's a joke.

Also, "normal babies" is an assumption on your part. No one knows if the baby in question in the OP is "normal" or high needs (like mine). And it seems a bit insensitive to suggest here that mothers should just "adapt and thrive" to interrupted sleep without giving any helpful suggestions on how to do so.

Edited for privacy.
Edited by skinnyloveBC - 1/2/14 at 1:12pm
post #31 of 32

SkinnyloveBC, I'm sorry you are having so many difficulties. Your situation is not normal (psychosis) and I am I looked through your previous posts and it sounds like you are getting professional help. Your toddler can be picking up on your emotions and hormonal changes and that can be affecting her behavior and night waking. I'm not blaming you but offering a possible partial explaination for what you describe as her high need behavior. It is documented that psychiatric illness in mothers affects their children. 

 

Mothers can put off toddlers from nursing during the day because they are busy, because the toddler is busy, or for other reasons. If the toddler doesn't get to nurse during the day then they can want to make up for it at night. My grandchildren would nurse all night when they were toddlers because their mother worked full time. This is just an example, I'm not saying it is what is happening in your home. 

 

High need children may have undiagnosed medical issues or conditions like tactile sensitivities that may respond to therapy. I had a child that had tactile sensitivities that had sleep issues and he did very well (not cured) with physical and occupational therapy. Allergies and eczema can cause a child to have sleep issues. Your child may benefit from occupational therapy beause of your psychiatric history. 

 

Why didn't I give helpful suggestions for how to thrive with night waking? That wasn't the question asked. I learned to do so while coping with chronic illness. You can personal message me if you would like to chat. 

post #32 of 32
@foreverinbluejeans, I don't appreciate your detailed discussion of what you presume my situation to be. I didn't ask for your opinion on my life--I merely pointed out that your simplistic recommendations didn't apply to complex situations such as mine (and many others on MDC).

Rather than further discuss my situation, I'll simply say that many of your assumptions about me and my lifestyle are completely incorrect.
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