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BBC Documentary - Cats

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

I am writing from a documentary company based in Oxford called Landmark Films. We make documentaries for BBC, ITV1, Channel 4 and Sky1. We are known for making access-led, intelligent, distinctive well crafted, warm and funny films about human stories, different places and institutions. Our latest documentary series was Brain Doctors for BBC2, a three part series on the neurology department at the John Radcliffe Hospital.

 

In the new year we are due to start making a film about cats for the BBC. We would like to look at the UK's opinion on cats, and represent a balanced view of things. I know that cats can be a problem for gardeners, either due to fouling or to bird killing which is frustrating. We would like to speak with people who have a problem or concern in this domain. We will also be speaking with all sorts of groups - cat protection and rehousing and looking at why stray and feral cat populations are increasing in the UK, how sanctuaries are struggling to deal with the intake of rescues.  If you have a strong interest in cats please feel fre to get in touch.

 

All correspondence will be dealt with in complete confidence and by contacting us you are not making a commitment to take part in the final programme - at this stage, it's just research.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Jessica

Jessica@landmarkfilms.com

01865297220/07530724477

post #2 of 3

Moving this to the Pets forum where it might get more attention. :)

post #3 of 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by JessicaHowe View Post
 

Hello,

 

I am writing from a documentary company based in Oxford called Landmark Films. We make documentaries for BBC, ITV1, Channel 4 and Sky1. We are known for making access-led, intelligent, distinctive well crafted, warm and funny films about human stories, different places and institutions. Our latest documentary series was Brain Doctors for BBC2, a three part series on the neurology department at the John Radcliffe Hospital.

 

In the new year we are due to start making a film about cats for the BBC. We would like to look at the UK's opinion on cats, and represent a balanced view of things. I know that cats can be a problem for gardeners, either due to fouling or to bird killing which is frustrating. We would like to speak with people who have a problem or concern in this domain. We will also be speaking with all sorts of groups - cat protection and rehousing and looking at why stray and feral cat populations are increasing in the UK, how sanctuaries are struggling to deal with the intake of rescues.  If you have a strong interest in cats please feel fre to get in touch.

 

All correspondence will be dealt with in complete confidence and by contacting us you are not making a commitment to take part in the final programme - at this stage, it's just research.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Jessica

Jessica@landmarkfilms.com

01865297220/07530724477

 

Not in the UK, but the bolded problems are universal!

 

We live in a mountainous rural area in the NW USA, much like the Lakes District (but, with higher peaks!).  We have had to deal with feral cats, as well as those that have been dumped by people.  I guess they think country folks want cats (surprise, not all of us feel that way).

 

When we lived in town, years ago, I knew of only two families with cats that kept them as indoor-only.  Every other neighborhood family with a cat allowed them to roam, with no concern for their neighbors.  I view this as being an irresponsible pet owner.  It's more like renting a pet, rather than keeping them full-time.  When the subject of their cat being on our property came up, the answers ranged from, "Oh, she never leaves her yard" (while we talked, her cat was defecating in our veggie bed) to "Oh, they are still so wild and need to hunt" to "He can't catch birds" to even stranger replies, "Socks is allergic to rodents and birds, so he knows not to go near them" and "Oh, you should be happy with the free fertilizer!"

 

None of them, not ONE, would look at it from our view.

 

Free-range cats DO prey on the native wildlife, as apex predators, and have no part in the native ecosystem.  We feed the native birds (quail, pheasant and songbirds) and have had many problems with feline predation at our feeding areas.  They also go after the native rodents (chipmunks, mice, voles, gophers) which should be prey for raptors and native WILD mammals.  

 

They also prove to be a big problem in our gardens, using them as litter boxes.  Nothing like working the dirt with your bare hands and pulling out cat poop.  

 

The adult daughter of a neighbor moved back home and brought with her, over 20 cats.  These are allowed to roam free and are not fixed.  Speaking with the neighbors resulted in NO understanding of the problems they have caused.  Thus, we have taken the matter into our own hands.  Less cats, initially, but she keeps bringing home more of them ("adopts" them from every "Free Kittens" sign or ad she sees).  The animals are not fed by them, nor are they sheltered.  In addition, they are not neutered to keep them from reproducing (she doesn't think that's fair to the cat).  Our county has no ordinances regarding this and there are no laws, either, as to dealing with them.

 

TNR programs do NOTHING to protect NATIVE wildlife.  They may allow less reproduction, but the risks to the local fauna are still very real.  

 

I'm sure there will be flaming regarding my post.  So be it.  You asked for responses (but, didn't say they had to be UK-only!).


Edited by grahamsmom98 - 1/11/14 at 7:35am
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