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Amy Parker's hit piece, "Growing Up Unvaccinated," deconstructed. - Page 2

post #21 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taximom5 View Post
 
8)  She does a great description of the suffering caused by vaccine-preventable illnesses.  I wonder if anybody realizes that the description of severe adverse reaction to vaccines is...identical?  Here is her description:
"Pain, discomfort, the inability to breathe or to eat or to swallow, fever and nightmares, itching all over your body so much that you can’t stand lying on bedsheets, losing so much weight you can’t walk properly, diarrhea that leaves you lying prostrate on the bathroom floor, the unpaid time off work for parents, the quarantine, missing school, missing parties, the worry, the sleepless nights, the sweat, the tears, the blood, the midnight visits to the emergency room, the time sitting in a doctor’s waiting room on your own because no one will sit near you because they’re rightfully scared of those spots all over your face."


 

Replace the bolded section with "weeks spent crying and holding a screaming baby, alone, because your pediatrician denies the symptoms are vaccine injuries and tells you to go ahead and eat some cheese while you nurse your dairy intolerant newborn....which she also denies that dairy is the issue" and you've got me!

 

I'm an early 80's baby and may very well have had many other things besides CP (assumably I'm immune to rubella because it never came up as an issue during my pregnancy) but even in a non-crunchy home we did not rush out to doctors for diagnosis and testing of every sniffle as she so clearly would have done to diagnose and receive antibiotics for all these issues.  And even pre-crunchy me - during my stint as a pre-vet student - even then I was pretty against antibiotics because of the risk of creating resistance.

 

As for issues with the article: "If you think your child’s immune system is strong enough to fight off vaccine-preventable diseases, then it’s strong enough to fight off the tiny amounts of dead or weakened pathogens present in any of the vaccines." Well, I have no problem with my child potentially contracting chicken pox, and as much as it would suck, even whooping cough doesn't keep me up at night.  BUT - when in the hell is anyone, out "in the wild", going to simultaneously contract pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, HIB, polio, and pneumococcal with some rotavirus thrown in for good measure?!?! Because that's a fairly standard course for 2mo babies nowadays yet I'm pretty sure mother nature never intended for it to happen that way.

post #22 of 146

Amy Parker seems very confused. Someone with some knowledge of disease and treatments should have proofread her piece before it went on line.

post #23 of 146
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
 

Amy Parker seems very confused. Someone with some knowledge of disease and treatments should have proofread her piece before it went on line.

 

But she says she is thriving mentally!  Because she has started seeing medical professionals!

 

"It was when I stopped taking sugar pills for everything and started seeing medical professionals that I began to thrive physically and mentally."

post #24 of 146

:lol

post #25 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taximom5 View Post
 

 

 

 

"It was when I stopped taking sugar pills for everything and started seeing medical professionals that I began to thrive physically and mentally."

So that is who took all my sugar pills! :winkAppleMark

post #26 of 146

Fantastic reply!  I've shared it with others already discussing the article.

 

This was a more diplomatic reply to a pro-vax friend who asked for thoughts on the original Parker article:
 

Quote:
Wow. I've never heard of a person whose contracted so many infectious diseases in their childhood: measles, mumps, rubella, a type of viral meningitis, scarlatina, whooping cough, yearly tonsillitis and chickenpox...precancerous HPV.

You ever heard of
 anyone getting this sick before?

It makes me suspicious that she contracted this many infections as a child, which all happen to be ones that you can get vaccinated for. 

I know many who didn't vaccinate or who didn't get the full courses and were fine (Yasmin included, only got diphtheria and tetanus and never had any of the those listed by the author.)

Also, I can`t speak about aromatherapy and the other alt med, but she must've seen a really bad homeopath. If she were treated by a good one, her infections would've resolved quickly and her overall health and immunity would've improved with each acute infection thereby gradually limiting her susceptibility to future infections. 

I recently treated a four-year-old girl who had scarlet fever 4 times within few months (as diagnosed by doctor). Each time, she was treated with a course of antibiotics for 10 days, was fine and then the infection returned a few days later. After the fourth round of antibiotics, the mom contacted me to treat her because a fever returned. Within two doses of the right homeopathic remedy, her daughter regained her health. Its been about 5 months now and she`s had no reoccurrence. 

There's a lot more to say about this article, esp. that on the surface it seems a well-written and credible anecdotal piece, but, with some circumspection, it becomes apparent, to me at least, that the piece seemingly seeks to discredit anything and everything alternative only (notice not a positive thing was attributed to the parents' lifestyle choices, not even the organic foods, thus leaving us only with the innuendo that even a whole foods natural organic diet is useless in disease prevention?) and continues to discredit alternative therapies by associating them with the supernatural, mystical, etc. ("i believed in angels, witchcraft, clairvoyants, crop circles, aliens at Nazca, giant ginger mariners spreading their knowledge to the Aztecs, the Incas and the Egyptians, and that I was somehow personally blessed by the Holy Spirit with healing abilities. I was having my aura read at a hefty price and filtering the fluoride out of my water. I was choosing to have past life regressions instead of taking antidepressants. I was taking my daily advice from tarot cards."). 

In the end, the article seems, to me, to serve the greater agenda of endorsing everything conventional, i.e., vaccinations are good, fluoride in water is good, etc., because, in her singular experience, it's validated by "facts and evidence-based science" (of which you're now seeing has some ethical biasing issues).

Wow, sorry, didn't mean to run on like that but, though the article may be true to the author's account, the more I read, the more I skeptical I became.
post #27 of 146

Here is another one I saw posted on facebook, and it reminded me of this thread: http://guggiedaly.blogspot.com/2014/01/growing-up-unvaccinated-voices-for.html

I sort of skimmed through it, I didn't actually read it thoroughly, I just thought it was interesting that I saw a friend posting it as counterpoint to the other article, which I saw was posted by many friends.

post #28 of 146
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by daddying View Post
 

Fantastic reply!  I've shared it with others already discussing the article.

 

This was a more diplomatic reply to a pro-vax friend who asked for thoughts on the original Parker article:
 

 

Thank you!  I'm thrilled that you shared it.  Please share away, all!  And the diplomatic reply was terrific.

Question:  since people ARE sharing this (which is great), should I edit the original post to include all the inconsistencies listed further down thread?

post #29 of 146
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola View Post
 

Here is another one I saw posted on facebook, and it reminded me of this thread: http://guggiedaly.blogspot.com/2014/01/growing-up-unvaccinated-voices-for.html

I sort of skimmed through it, I didn't actually read it thoroughly, I just thought it was interesting that I saw a friend posting it as counterpoint to the other article, which I saw was posted by many friends.

 

Ooh, that's a really good one!   Why don't you post it again as its own thread?  It might get even more views that way.  It's a great counterpoint to Ms. Parker's piece.

post #30 of 146

Whew!  Thank goodness I found this group and this thread.  I read this Amy Parker article today and it's been pissing me off all day.  I really appreciate the breakdown discrediting it, thanks!  One other thing I wanted to add,  the part where she mentions  that for 6 months 'she might have cancer'.  I could be wrong, but find this odd.  When I had an ultrasound that showed a suspicious lump in my breast, I was given an appointment for a biopsy the next day and had my results (not cancer) in less than 2 weeks.  I find it strange that she'd have to wait this long for a diagnosis, but I could be wrong. 

post #31 of 146
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emanni View Post
 

Whew!  Thank goodness I found this group and this thread.  I read this Amy Parker article today and it's been pissing me off all day.  I really appreciate the breakdown discrediting it, thanks!  One other thing I wanted to add,  the part where she mentions  that for 6 months 'she might have cancer'.  I could be wrong, but find this odd.  When I had an ultrasound that showed a suspicious lump in my breast, I was given an appointment for a biopsy the next day and had my results (not cancer) in less than 2 weeks.  I find it strange that she'd have to wait this long for a diagnosis, but I could be wrong. 

Good question, Emanni.  I have no knowledge about cancer or HPV, so I can't answer to your observation.  I do think it's obvious that there's a kind of dual personality to her article, and it makes me wonder if it's written by more than one person.

 

There are things that anyone who grew up in the UK ought to know, like the fact that nobody in Ms. Parker's age group was vaccinated as a child for mumps or for chicken pox. So OF COURSE she would have gotten natural cases of them.  And I did see a mention on Wikipedia that only 10% of England's water is fluoridated, but wasn't able to find either confirmation or denial of that one.  And Queen Elizabeth I dying of quinsy?  If anyone can find a reliable source for that one, please post it, because EVERY source I found gave only 3 possibilities:
1) arsenic poisoning from her white makeup, which contained white arsenic

2) old age (she was nearly 70 years old, which in 1605 was nearly twice the expected life span for a woman)

3) cancer (speculation only)

 

On the other hand, if this piece was actually written by Amy Parker Fieblekorn, as some people are alleging, there are some pretty significant errors that you would not expect from an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer with degrees in nursing and public health!  Those errors are discussed in some detail in posts 13, 15, 18, and 20 on page one of this thread.  And if you see more errors, post them here!

post #32 of 146
Thread Starter 

P.S.  Welcome aboard, Emanni!

post #33 of 146
Quote:
 

A few things I found interesting:

 

1.  Ms. Parks is 37.  She had her first at 18 or 19.  She had a HPV scare when her kids were 7 and under - so 11 or 12 years ago at the earliest. 2002 or 2003.

 

HPV testing did not come out til 2003, in the USA.  It was probably later in the UK, but I am not certain.  It was not routine in the UK until 2012.  

http://www.nhs.uk/chq/pages/2382.aspx?categoryid=118

 

2.  Both her kids had chicken pox while still breastfeeding?  Possible, but not likely.  

 

3.  Daily echinacea?  It is not typically a herb that is taken daily.

 

4.  The mention of both raw milk and "local, organic meat" do not ring true.  I am 5 years Amy's senior and am pretty sure no one even knew to care about whether milk was raw or not when I was younger.  While organic has been big for some time, the focus on local foods is likewise newish.  Anyone else here remember the late 70's, early eighties?


Edited by kathymuggle - 1/10/14 at 5:08am
post #34 of 146

Thanks for the welcome, I really appreciate it :)

post #35 of 146

I am in my 60s, born in the early 1950s. I grew up in a suburb of Los Angeles, CA.  I knew where the two health food stores were and I ate organic vegetables, fruit and drank raw milk all of my life, through childhood, pregnancies, breastfeeding, and now as a senior citizen.   Jessup, Adohr, Alta Dena were certified dairies when I was growing up.  One by one, they stopped producing raw milk.   The only time I did not drink it is when it was taken off the market for various scares as Q-fever.  I recall my parents buying raw milk during a recall; the dairy drive-in put a tape on the caps saying "PET FOOD", so that we could drive away.  I worked for an attorney while I was in college who was raised on a farm in OK, drank raw milk, and fed it to his wife and sons; he just liked the taste of it - he was a heavy smoker, so he did not care about the health aspect.  Lots of people have always drank raw milk and still do.

 

It is just one of those many things that crazy health nuts have always done.   However, if Ms. Parker grew up in the UK, I doubt she had access to raw milk or organic meat unless she was in the country.  Goat or sheep milk may have been more common.  This is just an observation on my part based on my travels and correspondence with people who grew up in the UK.   And yes, the focus on locally grown food is recent.

 

Quote:
  The mention of both raw milk and "local, organic meat" do not ring true.  I am 5 years Amy's senior and am pretty sure no even knew to care about whether milk was raw or not when I was younger.  While organic has been big for some time, the focus on local foods is likewise newish.  Anyone else here remember the late 70's, early eighties?
post #36 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post
 

A few things I found interesting:

 

1.  Ms. Parks is 37.  She had her first at 18 or 19.  She had a HPV scare when her kids were 7 and under - so 11 or 12 years ago at the earliest. 2002 or 2003.

 

HPV testing did not come out til 2003, in the USA.  It was probably later in the UK, but I am not certain.  It was not routine in the UK until 2012.  

http://www.nhs.uk/chq/pages/2382.aspx?categoryid=118

 

2.  Both her kids had chicken pox while still breastfeeding?  Possible, but not likely.  

 

3.  Daily echinacea?  It is not typically a herb that is taken daily.

 

4.  The mention of both raw milk and "local, organic meat" do not ring true.  I am 5 years Amy's senior and am pretty sure no even knew to care about whether milk was raw or not when I was younger.  While organic has been big for some time, the focus on local foods is likewise newish.  Anyone else here remember the late 70's, early eighties?

 

Yes, that's when our children were born in New Zealand.  the only thing organic that was available, was if we grew it ourselves.  most of the home gardeners around us, were still using left over dangerous garden chemical long banned, at that time.  Amazingly, unused cans of the stuff still occasionally turn up in inorganic rubbish collections, even in 2014.  There are still farmers out there who have old stores of highly toxic smuck.

 

This woman is bipolar, off the wall, and perhaps the medical profession hasn't actually done much for either the bipolar, her delusions, her knowledge deficits.... or anything else between the ears..  She's living in her own fantasy bubble where many of the facts are verifiable wrong.

 

Something she is blissfully oblivious too, which should be a major red flag to anyone with a brain.

 

Great work Taximom.

 

Not that that will stop the septics from using it as "verifiable truth"....

post #37 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
 

I am in my 60s, born in the early 1950s. I grew up in a suburb of Los Angeles, CA.  I knew where the two health food stores were and I ate organic vegetables, fruit and drank raw milk all of my life, through childhood, pregnancies, breastfeeding, and now as a senior citizen.   Jessup, Adohr, Alta Dena were certified dairies when I was growing up.  One by one, they stopped producing raw milk.   The only time I did not drink it is when it was taken off the market for various scares as Q-fever.  I recall my parents buying raw milk during a recall; the dairy drive-in put a tape on the caps saying "PET FOOD", so that we could drive away.  I worked for an attorney while I was in college who was raised on a farm in OK, drank raw milk, and fed it to his wife and sons; he just liked the taste of it - he was a heavy smoker, so he did not care about the health aspect.  Lots of people have always drank raw milk and still do.

 

 

Thanks for this.  I only started hearing about "raw milk" about 10 years ago.   It is very posible I was just out of the loop.    While people have certainly drunk milk straight from the cow, so to speak, forever…it has usually been because they were dairy farmers.

post #38 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by sassyfirechick View Post
 

Many evil people throughout history have been very eloquent in speech and writing.  Great breakdown!

 

I still laugh every time I come across this section: "I was studying homeopathy, herbalism, and aromatherapy; I believed in angels, witchcraft, clairvoyants, crop circles, aliens at Nazca, giant ginger mariners spreading their knowledge to the Aztecs, the Incas, and the Egyptians, and that I was somehow personally blessed by the Holy Spirit with healing abilities. I was having my aura read at a hefty price and filtering the fluoride out of my water".  That's like straight out 'let me google everything possible that would be considered alternative/hippy/crunchy and throw it into one long run on sentence'! :rotflmao


This is how I knew that she was either a big giant liar, OR a person talking to the aliens for suggestions on her dinner menu.

post #39 of 146

My hubby grew up with raw milk in the 70's but it was from a family friend. I am not sure on the timeline on when it became illegal to sell in our state, but I know it has only in the last 10 years or so become legal through the means of milk shares (you own part of the cow and pay the farmer for taking care of it for you and therefore can legally drink milk from that cow). Eh, I don't know that it would be possible one way or the other to verify whether she had access to it or organic foods or not. There was The Farm here, maybe there were similar places in the UK. shrug.gif

post #40 of 146

Thank you for posting this! As soon as I read her blog  I knew it came with an agenda. It's the most ridiculous blog post I've read in awhile.... driving people to make a fear based decision concerning vaccines. I mean SCARING people into getting vaccines. I was so offended by her slander against healthy living. This has caused quite the debate through my facebook circles which is crazy since this is so obviously a blog of crap... So glad to find people that agree with me.

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