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When does food become critical? - Page 2

post #21 of 29

I think food is mostly fun until they're not consuming as much milk.  That could be up to 3, depending on the child.  I think their instinctual reactions to food are appropriate to their needs and personality type.  My oldest daughter wasn't much into food until she was 2.  Seriously.  She was chubby until she was around 1.5 when she started running around all the time and got skinny.  

 

My youngest daughter was into food much earlier, but she has gone through many phases of going in and out of interest.  I think there is nothing to worry about, if the babies health is fine, nothing to worry about.  Relax, mama.  Breathe in, breathe out.

post #22 of 29

Hi,

I think If your doctor isn't worried then do not worry about it :)

post #23 of 29

My first child didn't eat much solid foods before a year, but I didn't really encourage it either.  I also was up a lot at night to provide milk which she wouldn't really drink in the day.  Unfortunately, I was exhausted and realized I needed to do things differently with my second child.

 

Now my 9 month old eats a lot of solid food - everything I eat in fact.  And she sleeps through the night.  I still breast feed her, 5-6 times a day but only 4 of those feedings are 'large' (the ones before her naps, and right before bed).  With my first daughter, I gave her single ingredient foods - pureed or very simple foods and she ate a bit but wasn't that interested.  Now with my second I chew up bits of my own food and give it to her and she really loves a lot of it.  It doesn't matter if its spicy, and she eats everything.  Its much easier than making baby food and I think she eats better as a result because we eat as a family. 

 

But if nursing a lot at night isn't creating a challenge for you then that's also a way to get the nutrition.  It just got too hard for me.

post #24 of 29
It can be totally normal. I wanted to tell you my son didn't eat any solids until 16 months! Extremely intelligent and healthy 2 1/2 yr old now. It was so hard not to question his instincts but they know. Think of times before ovens and easy stoves. Babies drink milk until they can chew and swallow well. That time varies.

Enjoy it too smile.gif they will stop nursing one day xoxo
post #25 of 29

Don't worry, mama!  Unless your child is lethargic, showing serious personality changes, poor color, etc. she is likely fine and will get to enjoying foods when she is ready.  Not to say that I wouldn't continue offering!  Glad to hear that your pediatrician is supportive, many aren't when you're kiddo starts/stays small but you are the best judge of your daughter's health and you are continuing the give her the best nutrition possible.  Weight charts in particular are misleading, most babies/toddlers are given formula in our country and, without judgment, those children typically tip the bell curve of weight to higher levels.

post #26 of 29

I'll chime in w PPs who've said to relax & be easy on yourself if she's growing fine (btw, the weight charts from the WHO are based on BF infants & are much more appropriate for nursed babies, IMO), but also especially watch her development! That can be a good indicator & also may reassure you not to worry needlessly. Is she continuing to develop new skills as she grows?

 

Although my baby is only 5 mos old, I'll chime in with our story: she was only at the 3rd percentile at birth, then took a nosedive off the chart, even the WHO chart by 2 mos. We worked to increase milk supply/ camped her out at the breast 24/7 & had weight checks 2x per week to see that she was approaching her initial line quickly-- my pedi (who nursed 8 babies past age one herself) said as long as she was closer each week than the week before/ didn't start falling off again *AND* as long as she kept developing skills on time, then we would not talk about supplmenting... fast forward to 4 mos & the typical "solid foods" talk-- she said DO NOT give her anything but breast milk until she meets or exceeds her initial growth curve bc obviously breast milk is more nutrient dense & is better for growth (even of underweight babies) than any other food in existence. Today she's above the 3rd percentile & we have "permission" to introduce other foods. Basically, she didn't want solids to replace any potential breast milk feedings bc she considers other foods to be inferior to breastmilk for infant growth.

post #27 of 29

My son didn't eat much food until past a year. I worried about him not eating enough, too. He was mainly interested in bread or crackers or maybe bananas, if it wasn't my milk. If you want to nudge her toward more eating, you could cut or delay nursings and start with food. Or, you could have her hang out with some other little ones who are eating and she might be interested in copying them, eventually. Breast milk is the perfect food for babies and toddlers, and when your doc says she's healthy, believe it! It's more like breast milk makes up for the inadequacies of a solid food diet than solid foods making up for the inadequacy of breast milk. 

post #28 of 29

My son is nearing 11 months and gets most of his nutrition from milk. He's interested in food, and we always share some of what we're eating unless it's not good for him, but he always prefers nursing when I'm nearby. We're getting him used to lots of different foods. I'm proud to say the only thing he's turned away from is brussel sprouts. Everything else he'll eat, even while making a yucky face :eyesroll. I don't know how food could be better for a baby than breastmilk.

post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mum4vr View Post
 

I'll chime in w PPs who've said to relax & be easy on yourself if she's growing fine (btw, the weight charts from the WHO are based on BF infants & are much more appropriate for nursed babies, IMO), but also especially watch her development! That can be a good indicator & also may reassure you not to worry needlessly. Is she continuing to develop new skills as she grows?

 

The only skill we are really watching is her crawling/pulling herself up, which she is behind on (not yet in red flag area, though).  Otherwise, she keeps developing skills all the time.  The doctor observed her to be way ahead on social behaviors.

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