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Let’s pretend gas is $10.00 a gallon – what would you do differently? - Page 2

post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragana View Post


They're actually quite a bit more expensive, so it's not purely a financial argument, but maybe used ones are a less expensive option now that they've been around for a while (I haven't checked). I just do kid-related runs around town and some errands, but DH has to commute 30-40 minutes each way every weekday. His car is small and relatively efficient, but not hybrid level.

 

Yeah, we looked during our last car purchase.  The gas didn't justify it then, but at $10.00, it probably would for us.

post #22 of 34

We might refine our own biodiesel, which is a doable at home thing. Right now we buy from our local coop. It is a bit more expensive than regular diesel. If it was the same price or lower then everyone who drives a diesel would want it and it would overwhelm production. We get 40mpg in our VW TDIs right now. 

post #23 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanma View Post
 

We get 40mpg in our VW TDIs right now. 

Wow, cool. I think that's almost double what our cars get. Yes, carS. Ugh. If gas was $10, we might dump my car, and I would just deal with getting kids around on the bus/walking. Although when it's -15F that prospect is not too enticing.

post #24 of 34

My MIL's new Honda gets 40 also. It's a conventional car. Cars with good gas mileage are out there.

post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanma View Post
 

My MIL's new Honda gets 40 also. It's a conventional car. Cars with good gas mileage are out there.

 

I'm going to guess that's highway driving.

post #26 of 34

I'm not sure Mulvah, I just caught part of the conversation. I get 39-40 in my 2004 TDI in the city and 40-43 or so on the highway. I just googled it and it says for the new 2014 Honda Civics it's 30/39 city/hwy. I used to get 40 way back in the 1990s, too. I had a Honda Civic hatch that got that and a Dodge Colt back in the late 80s/early 90s. They can make them efficient if they want to, but they only want to if they think that's what will sell.

post #27 of 34

Ours is rated at 21 city and 28 highway, but it's a Mazda 5 - the small mini-van-ish car. Pretty much every day I need to transport between 2 and 5 kids, and the problem is that smaller, more fuel-efficient cars don't fit enough people. We are only a family of 4, so if we weren't taking other kids after school, we could get a Civic, Matrix, etc. and be fine. That would definitely be a consideration if gas was $10. Thinking about it, I'm not sure we could get everyone where they need to go on public transportation.

post #28 of 34

In case I wasn't clear:  my family would likely buy a Hybrid or electric car if gas was $10/gallon because it would be worth it to us.  I don't assume everyone would buy a hybrid or electric car and I don't assume it would be worth it for everyone, but it would very likely be worth it for our family, based on our goals, needs, wants, etc. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beanma View Post
 

I'm not sure Mulvah, I just caught part of the conversation. I get 39-40 in my 2004 TDI in the city and 40-43 or so on the highway. I just googled it and it says for the new 2014 Honda Civics it's 30/39 city/hwy. I used to get 40 way back in the 1990s, too. I had a Honda Civic hatch that got that and a Dodge Colt back in the late 80s/early 90s. They can make them efficient if they want to, but they only want to if they think that's what will sell.

 

Highway mileage is very different from city mileage; I would expect that type of mileage for highway driving.

post #29 of 34

Depends on the car. I see about 3-5 miles difference between city and highway if that much in my VW Golf TDI. I have been doing a bit more highway driving lately and getting better a gallon or two better mileage per fuel up. I usually figure it out each time I fill up and for the past 10 years it's been consistently a least 38, usually 39 or 40, occasionally 41. My DH's car, which he rarely uses because he walks to work and all over town, is a VW Jetta TDI and he says he can get 45 mpg. I don't drive it very much.

 

Back in the day, I got great mileage in my 91 Honda Civic, too. It was about 40 mpg per tank, so a mix of city and highway. Here's the ratings on a '91 Honda Civic CRX https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/noframes/7474.shtml . Mine wasn't a CRX, and I didn't get gas mileage that was quite that good, but it was probably something like 40-42 for highway and maybe 35-37 for city. They can make them fuel efficient if they want to.

post #30 of 34

I fondly remember my older Honda Civic!  I never got anything less than 36 miles per gallon, mix city and highway driving. I think it was a '96.  Our Honda Fit gets about 33mpg, mixed city/hiwy.  The Civics are worse for gas mileage.  They're much heavier than they used to be and less efficient.

 

Hmmm . . . I would start to get excited if gas went up to $10 per gallon.  I noticed a LOT more carpooling at school and a lot less cars on the road in my tiny town when gas creeped close to $5 per gallon.  It made walking and biking through town much more pleasant.

 

Of course, this is just assuming gas prices just affects car driving.  It would really mean that the cost of everything would go up.  Hmmm . . . but maybe manufacturing jobs would come back to being a local option, since it may become less expensive to manufacture in the US, rather than manufacturing in another country and shipping across the globe.  More jobs would be great!

 

I am having a hard time hearing some of my local townsfolk complain about the lack of road maintenance and high gas prices.  These are the people who live a 20 minute drive out in the country from our little town and like to have smooth roads so they can travel at 50+ miles per hour.  They take it as an affront to their freedom that our economy is so bad that we cannot afford to maintain the country roads like we used to.  I appreciate that we all pay for things that some people use more than others:  library, police, fire, street lights for the city, etc.  But somehow the expectation that we all pay for expensive country roads so people can have their expensive estates far out of town and still zip through this place at a high speed on their way to the larger city for their high-paying job rubs me the wrong way.  But I think I've gone off on a tangent.

 

Moving closer to town and paying a higher price for housing is something we have already accomplished.  Both because we expect gas prices to rise AND because we would like to "age in place" and not have to leave our home when aging makes us unsafe to drive.  This means we have saved money by going down to 1 car for DH's commute and weekend errands.  The kids and I bike everywhere locally.

 

We'd really need to grow more food, rather than keep a garden just for fun.

 

Own fewer "things" and take better care of them.

 

Enjoy fresher air and less car noise!

 

: )

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragana View Post

Thinking about it, I'm not sure we could get everyone where they need to go on public transportation.

Yes, and the cost of public transportation would increase along with fuel prices. Also, the school bus to my kids' school doesn't serve our area, and I'm not putting my kindergartner on a city bus by herself, so I'd have to ride round-trip in the morning and the afternoon to get her to and from school. I wonder how those costs would stack up against the gas it would take to fuel my car for that distance.

Like you, we have a larger car that seats 7 people despite the fact that we're a 4-person family, because we do frequently carpool. Smaller, more fuel efficient cars are great (DH has one for work), but larger cars, while less fuel efficient, do allow carpooling, so there is some trade-off there.
post #32 of 34

Considering my dh lives 120 miles away during the work week and only comes home one day at a time, we'd pretty much never be able to see him again.  Gas is a huge killer for us right now, at $10 a gallon he would have to quit his job if he ever wanted to see his family.  

post #33 of 34
I agree that I would stop driving my kids to school. I'd be more conscious of planning/combining errands. But as it is, I use about half of the gas that I did 5 years ago because I've cut down on unnecessary trips. So there wouldn't be much more to cut. DH works from home, so he doesn't drive much either.
post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post


Yes, and the cost of public transportation would increase along with fuel prices. Also, the school bus to my kids' school doesn't serve our area, and I'm not putting my kindergartner on a city bus by herself, so I'd have to ride round-trip in the morning and the afternoon to get her to and from school. I wonder how those costs would stack up against the gas it would take to fuel my car for that distance.

Like you, we have a larger car that seats 7 people despite the fact that we're a 4-person family, because we do frequently carpool. Smaller, more fuel efficient cars are great (DH has one for work), but larger cars, while less fuel efficient, do allow carpooling, so there is some trade-off there.


In the $10 gas scenario, it's possible people would make arrangements with those of us with larger cars to take kids to/from school - avoid the public transportation issue for kids too young & possible also cheaper for both parties.

 

Interesting discussion!

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