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Thinking of homeschool, wondering if I can?! - Page 2

post #21 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tri31 View Post
 


I just heard back from the coordinator. They will do services,but it has to be scheduled as it was during the school year. Which is every day- which overly constrains OUR schedule. In which case, I think I will drop the the whole thing. No specials for non students. It was worth a shot. Hope everything is going smooth for you. :rainbow

That's no fun - similar to what we're dealing with now. My schedule has just gotten nuts. DS2 to preschool from 8:30-12:30, and DS1 from 9:45-12. Really?! And they're making him do reading & spelling with the one teacher he hates...he was literally crying today when he found that out. So looking at the reality of the situation, I think we'll ditch the partial day idea after all and just do homeschool.  Hope you have good luck with your guy!  Maybe you could do some extracurricular activities with him to help with social skills?  The rec center in our town has a ton of fun programs, not too expensive.

post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by my3beasties View Post
 
 

I am so excited about homeschool!  Yesterday was our first day, and we jumped right into Greek Mythology & how it influenced artists and authors centuries later, like when Shakespeare turned the tragic myth of Pyramus & Thisby on its ear in his comedy "A Midsummer Night's Dream". My son was CRACKING up, loved it!! There is no way public school would have covered something like that until probably 11th grade. I feel like this is going to be great for all of us.

 

If he likes the Greek Mythology and Shakespeare, I highly recommend Marcia William's books, though the format would appeal to some people more than others.  It make take him on some tangents, but that can be good!  She has 2 books on Shakespeare, several on Greek mythology, if you include the Odyssey and Iliad.  She also has books on Egyptian mythology, Chaucer, Robin Hood, all kinds of great volumes.  The Shakespeare books are great for adults as well, as they give the best synopsis of the plays I have seen.  My girls love the comic-book-style format, and I love the snippets of the original language.  Always wonderfully illustrated.

 

Also slightly on tangent to Greek/Roman myths, we also really loved Zoo in the Sky and others of that series on the stars and planets.  Christina Balit (illustrator) has her pictures gracing some of our favorite books of Greek myths--Heracles and others-- and from other cultures, such as her story of Ishtar.  DD1 started her reading adventures with the graphic novel "Perseus and Medusa", her favorite story which we read in many incarnations.

 

Finally, once we had a deep familiarity with Greek myth, I read Percy Jackson and the Lightening Thief to her.

 

I couldn't help but recommend these to you.  We had our time immersed in Greek mythology, which I thoroughly enjoyed.  My oldest has always loved predators, the toothier the better, and she loved the monsters, especially the Chimera which Belleraphon fought on the back of Pegasus.

post #23 of 34
Thread Starter 

Ooh!! Thanks for sharing - I will definitely check these out! Taking notes to look for them on Monday when we do library day... notes2.gif


DS1 definitely loves monsters and predators - so does DS2. I was going to start with the Greek creation myths, so he gets an idea of who the "main players" are and some background, then skip around to the different heroes and nasty critters...like the Chimera, Medusa, the riddle of the Sphinx, etc. I think they'll all love the stories...I did! (My Yiayia - Greek grandma - was a high school English teacher, and I have the mythology book she taught from...I ate that thing up as a kid.)

 

We're also getting into writing short stories.  I realized school has made him terrified to write, when I asked him what the essential elements of a story are, and the first thing he said was "Punctuation? Spelling?" duh.gif  No, my dear boy!! Creativity! Character, setting, plot, theme! All of a sudden the light bulb went on, and it was like this weight was lifted. "You mean I can just be creative, and not worry about spelling and stuff until later?!" YES!!!  So he started with recounting a very vivid dream he had in short story form, and WOW this kid has an imagination, so visually descriptive! 

Score: Homeschool - 1000, School - Zip. :joy

post #24 of 34

Feeling so down today. I feel like I must be delusional, how can I school Jaden when I my attention and responsibilities are so scattered? The baby just wants to be cuddled, and I can't sit with her 10 seconds. She (21 months) and we are all struggling. I am not giving anyone what they need. I am loosing ground, it hasn't even been 3 weeks! Support, OMG please pray for me. I have never felt so naive. I am!

post #25 of 34

tri, have you done any period of de-schooling? If he was having that many anxieties about school it would be especially helpful to get a break and just do life for a week or so. If you want to bring in seatwork do that after a break, and maybe it doesn't need to be the bulk of the day, just something to knock out really quick and move on to something more fun or productive. Many kids in countries and schools where they aren't given academics before age 7 catch up to those who are formally schooled early on very very quickly when it is introduced, so I wouldn't worry about falling behind at this point.

post #26 of 34

Thank you so much for the life line.tomato.gif Yes, Jaden has red lined with school big time. Deschooling for a few days sounds like a wise move, otherwise i am just backing him into the same desperate corner.I tell people we are homeschooling and instantly the expectation is that I have entered a race, and deserve a trail by fire. I have been so mad that I can't get the support I need from people. That no one has faith in me. But it is me that hasn't had faith today. I have not been supporting me, I have been looking at myself from the perspective of some "other" no wonder I can't feel good about what we are doing. I'm haven't been present. I need to be here in my own business :stillheart

post #27 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tri31 View Post
 

Feeling so down today. I feel like I must be delusional, how can I school Jaden when I my attention and responsibilities are so scattered? The baby just wants to be cuddled, and I can't sit with her 10 seconds. She (21 months) and we are all struggling. I am not giving anyone what they need. I am loosing ground, it hasn't even been 3 weeks! Support, OMG please pray for me. I have never felt so naive. I am!


Remember - you have needs too!! The baby can be cuddled, Jaden's schooling can wait a bit, and you can take a break too. I agree with JamieCatheryn, take a period of de-schooling, and get some fresh perspective on things before coming back at it. Don't feel like you have to do X-Y-Z just because the school did - as I'm discovering, that's the beauty of homeschool! You can do anything he wants to do!

 

Try looking up some of the Montessori subjects, and make it fun!  Practical Life skills are fun things like: • Pouring & Transferring • Washing & Cleaning • Polishing • Manipulatives • Woodworking • Sewing & Weaving • Food Preparation • Yard & Garden  Check out this site for ideas: http://www.montessoriservices.com/

 

Practical Life lessons can be strapping on aprons and baking cookies while you have the baby in her Ergo carrier!  You can easily turn it into a math & baking science lesson: "How many of these 1/3 cup scoops will make 1 whole cup?" and "Which ball of cookie dough do you think will cook faster - the big one, or the little one? Why?"  Then have him help clean up - teaches responsibility and cleanliness, and gives him a sense of pride in helping, too.

 

You can look outside at the clouds, and look up online what types of clouds they are, and how they are formed.  Do an experiment with a closely-supervised pot of boiling water and a clear container, so he can see how steam condenses and forms clouds & then precipitation.  Kids LOVE real-life, experiential learning like this!

 

You don't have to be restrained to anything in particular, especially starting out. Nobody's grading you.  Make it fun - that's the whole point of learning! :)  Now, go make yourself a relaxing cup of tea, cuddle the baby & Jaden too, and talk about a fun project to try tomorrow. :Hug

post #28 of 34
It's totally ok to give it a rest for awhile, especially since you pulled him out of a bad school situation. At that age (he's 6,right? I have a 5.5yo) letting them run around outside and then snuggling up with a book is a successful day of homeschooling!
My older dd was 7 when the next baby came along and, believe me, there were enough days like that where if I couldn't do it without a velcro toddler we just did the best we could and called it good. There were a LOT of those days and now,years later, it turned out fine!
post #29 of 34

Wow, you guys are working way too hard at this! ;-)

 

Don't get me wrong: my house is rarely presentable and I have to-do lists everywhere that get neglected, but homeschooling is the easiest part of my life. Whenever I hear parents freaking out "can I do this?!" I think "Honey, you have no idea how simple it really is." 

 

I should say, it CAN be that simple if you want it to be. 

 

And SweetSilver, thanks for a great chuckle - very funny!

post #30 of 34

Can I get some feedback? I attended Jaden's IEP meeting yesterday. Here is my situation. Jaden has sensory issues, he's never been diagnosed as actually having a classifiable disorder. He has been receiving special services PT OT and speech (which he resumed about 10 days ago) he used to have an aide, but was in a normal classroom setting. For the beginning of this school year he did well. They are in the first year of implementing core curriculum at our elementary school and are progressively integrating 1st grade work into the curriculum.He can do it, but for all of them it is a challenge. Add to this that his social skills are delayed/strained and I think that specifically his emotional reactions to people as he is integrating and developing relationships at school are causing him the most anxiety. So anyway we had Christmas break and he fell apart. He started refusing to go to school over several weeks.We decided to home school because his anxiety AT HOME was getting so uncomfortable. He is only 6 and I feel like he is still young and deserves to be heard when he says he feels threatened. OMG they really made me feel like I an ass. Like I should be some sort of expert. Should I steer clear of them in the future? He seems happy, and I am committed to keeping things grounded and fun at "mommy's school". We are just getting started, and here I am being bombarded with how wonderfully everything was going at school. Financially I don't know if we can home school indefinitely. I feel like I am alone on the moon.

Could someone just tell me I am not a huge screw up gloomy.gif 

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tricia Valek View Post
 

 OMG they really made me feel like I an ass. Like I should be some sort of expert. Should I steer clear of them in the future? 

Could someone just tell me I am not a huge screw up gloomy.gif 

Yes, you are not a huge screwup.  And I would steer clear of anyone who plants the seeds of so much doubt when your heart speaks otherwise.

post #32 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tricia Valek View Post
 

Can I get some feedback? I attended Jaden's IEP meeting yesterday. Here is my situation. Jaden has sensory issues, he's never been diagnosed as actually having a classifiable disorder. He has been receiving special services PT OT and speech (which he resumed about 10 days ago) he used to have an aide, but was in a normal classroom setting. For the beginning of this school year he did well. They are in the first year of implementing core curriculum at our elementary school and are progressively integrating 1st grade work into the curriculum.He can do it, but for all of them it is a challenge. Add to this that his social skills are delayed/strained and I think that specifically his emotional reactions to people as he is integrating and developing relationships at school are causing him the most anxiety. So anyway we had Christmas break and he fell apart. He started refusing to go to school over several weeks.We decided to home school because his anxiety AT HOME was getting so uncomfortable. He is only 6 and I feel like he is still young and deserves to be heard when he says he feels threatened. OMG they really made me feel like I an ass. Like I should be some sort of expert. Should I steer clear of them in the future? He seems happy, and I am committed to keeping things grounded and fun at "mommy's school". We are just getting started, and here I am being bombarded with how wonderfully everything was going at school. Financially I don't know if we can home school indefinitely. I feel like I am alone on the moon.

Could someone just tell me I am not a huge screw up gloomy.gif 


I second that, @SweetSilver! You are not a huge screw up, Tricia. My DS's school pulled the same BS on me...they made me feel like a total ass for thinking he wasn't doing well with the school environment. The principal was sooo nicey-nice, just nauseatingly sweet, assuring me everything is wonderful at school...and oh no, the special ed teacher never takes away his recess time! Then DS came home that same day, and said the special ed teacher took away 5  min of recess for...ahem...fidgeting with a block. Under the table. splat.gif My mom worked for the same school some years back, and says they actually take classes on how to do this to parents. I believe it, because no way could anyone be that passive-aggressive and disarm you by blowing smoke up your ass without some kind of training. 

And Core Curriculum? Let me sum up: FIREdevil.gif  "Let's put the whole 180 degree spectrum of learning abilities into a 90 degree shoebox, and call it good! So the bright ones will be squelched, big deal...but the ones whose test scores aren't good enough for us to get our funding? We'll say they must have ADHD! Put them on drugs, in special ed, so that their scores don't count! Then we'll push kids to do more than they're ready for, all in the name of furthering their education."

 

Bottom line: You ARE the expert on your child, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise. YOU are his first and most effective teacher.  Your son doesn't need a formal diagnosis for him to have issues - and the school doesn't need to see it for them to be real. Mothers' intuition is worth more than the opinions of a hundred specialists or "educators". Steer clear of anyone who makes you feel the way they did; speaking from similar experience, those people do NOT have your child's best interests at heart.

 

Personally, I switched all my kids to a different school, where we are just outside the attendance area, but it will be a fresh start and I don't have to deal with those same jerks. DS1 will be on the wait list for next year, and if he doesn't get in, oh well. Hoping his self-esteem will be up, and his vision problems will be addressed by then, and he'll do better in the classroom. If not, no big deal - I'll homeschool!

post #33 of 34
You certainly ARE an expert on your own child! After all, you've taught him for 6 years already. smile.gif
post #34 of 34

How are things going now?

 

My experience with starting homeschooling is that it was no extra work, compared with "dealing with school when it doesn't meet the child's needs." In fact, it was easier.

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