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Old TV Shows and reference to disease

post #1 of 44
Thread Starter 

I've noticed in a lot of the shows of the 50's, measles, mumps, and chicken pox are treated as no big deal, and nothing more than a childhood nuisance.  Societal attitude sure has changed in the last 60+yrs.  Even when an adult contracted one of those on tv, it was no big deal either.   The shows didn't have the parents worried senseless, screaming like a maniac over catching an illness, nor did it alarm an entire neighborhood.   

Yesterday on Green Acres, a joke was made about someone paying for everyone's flu shot, as tho it were some kind of medicine only the priveleged should have access to.  

post #2 of 44

I have a few but I really have to dig to find them ---- greeting cards! Hallmark and others had a whole line of them by the disease, I do have one if I can find it that had a wheel and you could move it to fit who you were sending it to

 

here are some from Ebay - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Unused-Vintage-Ca-1960-Card-Sorry-You-Have-Mumps-Chicken-Pox-Measles-/191054948608?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2c7bc32900

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/4-VINTAGE-UNUSED-CHILDRENS-GET-WELL-CARDS-1-HALLMARK-1-RUSTCRAFT-2-SUNSHINE-/291067105073?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43c4f38f31

post #3 of 44

post #4 of 44

Yes, measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, even whooping cough in the Our Gang series were a joke, not an emergency.  Look to literature and children's rhymes too.

 

There was a Twilight Zone with a girl, Susan Gordon, with a brace on her leg, and the big problem was her abusive aunt who was played by Nancy Kulp, Season 3 Episode 25 The Fugitive.

 

I recall that after WWII, there was a push to wipe out all childhood diseases in one generation, just as we had wiped out the Nazis.


Edited by applejuice - 2/8/14 at 4:36pm
post #5 of 44

The Brady Bunch.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFoDhftULdc

 

There are others, but I can't find them right now.

post #6 of 44

Yes, that Brady Bunch episode was done in 1970 after measles vaccine was introduced.  In the storyline, they walked home from school - horrors, infecting everyone in their path!  The big deal was not measles, but the whether they should have a lady doctor or a male doctor, and they made house calls.


Edited by applejuice - 2/5/14 at 5:55pm
post #7 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
 

Yes, measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, even whooping cough in the Our Gang series were a joke, not an emergency.  Look to literature and children's rhymes too.

 

There was a Twilight Zone with a girl with a brace on her leg, and the big problem was her abusive aunt who was played by the secretary from the Beverly Hillbillies, cannot recall her name now.

 

I recall that after WWII, there was a push to wipe out all childhood diseases in one generation, just as we had wiped out the Nazis.

Except we didn't, we invited them over here to continue their work.

post #8 of 44

 

Re-Setting the Compass

 

 

 

Quote:

These are the words Barney spoke to Fred, in the 1961 Flintstones episode,In the Dough, 
when Betty and Wilma came down with Measles. Measles hasn’t changed since 1961, 
but the picture painted by the mass media certainly has.

 
 

 

post #9 of 44
Quote:
 Except we didn't, we invited them over here to continue their work.

Yes, we did.

 

Bayer drug company was one of theirs.

 

Thalidomide, BTW, was a Nazi development.

 

Mirzam - did you know that Germany was the first nation to have national health care? Teddy Roosevelt wanted the US to follow their example, but we know that did not happen, but steps in that direction did happen in the form of the Pure Food and Drug Act which became the FDA.

post #10 of 44

Sex and the City Season 6 Episode 9 "A women's right to shoes" (2003-2004)

Miranda catches chicken pox from her toddler son but still flirts with the doctor: No big deal.

post #11 of 44

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0583591/plotsummary?ref_=tt_ov_pl

 

Friends 'The One with the Chicken Pox' 1996

post #12 of 44

This is not a television show, but a personal anecdote ...

 

In the early 1970s, I was a nanny for a family. The mother was an only child born in 1946.  She never had any of the childhood diseases.

 

She was a career woman.

 

Her children were born in 1966 and 1969.  When they went to school, they brought all of those diseases home to her - measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox!

 

One disease at a time!

 

The little girls were in bed with their respective rashes, reading playing, watching television.

 

The mom was flat out in her room, very sick.  She also had lots of allergies. She was quite miserable. It took her a long time to get well, but her girls were up and around in no time.

post #13 of 44

Not from tv but...

Quote:

All around the mulberry bush (or cobbler's bench)

The monkey chased the weasel;

The monkey thought 'twas all in fun, (or "'twas all in good sport") (or "that it was a joke") (or "it was a big joke")

Pop! goes the weasel.

A penny for a spool of thread,

A penny for a needle—

That's the way the money goes,

Pop! goes the weasel.

Jimmy's got the whooping cough

And Timmy's got the measles

That's the way the story goes

Pop! goes the weasel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pop_Goes_the_Weasel

 

In the mid 90s I had to tell a woman I babysat for that her 1 year old might have been exposed to chickenpox and she was not in the least upset, Sounded a bit happy to have her get them really. She is a doctor.

post #14 of 44

In "Gone With The Wind", Scarlett O'Hara's first husband, Charles, dies from the measles early in the war. 

 

To be honest, to me, this shows that measles is a children's disease that is easily recovered from, but deadly to adults.

 

In the story, Margaret Mitchell and/or the screenwriters used this incident to show how protected Charles was as a child, a mama's boy, so much that he was never exposed to the measles.

post #15 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
 

In "Gone With The Wind", Scarlett O'Hara's first husband, Charles, dies from the measles early in the war. 

 

To be honest, to me, this shows that measles is a children's disease that is easily recovered from, but deadly to adults.

 

In the story, Margaret Mitchell and/or the screenwriters used this incident to show how protected Charles was as a child, a mama's boy, so much that he was never exposed to the measles.

Interesting.

post #16 of 44

There is a television show called H2O - Just add water.  It is from Australia and it is not that old (5 years, maybe).  In one of the epidsode, everyone is all panic as they have some unspecified disease.  When they are finally diagnosed with measles, everyone just laughs, stops worrying and moves on.  

 

http://h2o.wikia.com/wiki/Season_1:_Episode_17:_Under_the_Weather

post #17 of 44
While I think this thread is interesting, I do have the repeated issue with references to Nazis in conjunction with vaccine developers and pro-vaxxers (as the analogy was made in another thread.). I don't think comparisons like this are doing us any service. I cannot see how this comparison is made and I would personally like if people could stop using it. Just my two cents.
post #18 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by nukuspot View Post

While I think this thread is interesting, I do have the repeated issue with references to Nazis in conjunction with vaccine developers and pro-vaxxers (as the analogy was made in another thread.). I don't think comparisons like this are doing us any service. I cannot see how this comparison is made and I would personally like if people could stop using it. Just my two cents.

Nothing to do with vaccines, but it is a historical fact that the US took in Nazi scientists at the end of WWII. That's all the reference was about. No offense intended.

post #19 of 44

Godwin's Law!

 

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/2.10/godwin.if_pr.html

 

Back to your regularly scheduled thread.

post #20 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by nukuspot View Post

While I think this thread is interesting, I do have the repeated issue with references to Nazis in conjunction with vaccine developers and pro-vaxxers (as the analogy was made in another thread.). I don't think comparisons like this are doing us any service. I cannot see how this comparison is made and I would personally like if people could stop using it. Just my two cents.

link, please.  Not sure what spurred this on…..

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