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Do I need to vax for my child to attend school? - Page 3

post #41 of 56

No, just scroll down.

post #42 of 56

I asked a  question about what counts as "a strong religious or moral objection" to vaccines, and in response a user posts assumptions (which actually are wrong in many places) about my and my children's medical history. And that's a contribution which two other users "like". I have my big girl pants on but I think that's a bit beyond even the debate threads. I have flagged it, but in the spirit of trying to keep this as friendly as possible I'd appreciate if the user (Taximom) would be nice enough to self edit.

 

OP - post in the Selective and Delayed for supportive answers if this thread isn't what you were looking for (which I suspect it wasn't).  

post #43 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by prosciencemum View Post

I asked a  question about what counts as "a strong religious or moral objection" to vaccines, and in response a user posts assumptions (which actually are wrong in many places) about my and my children's medical history. And that's a contribution which two other users "like". I have my big girl pants on but I think that's a bit beyond even the debate threads. I have flagged it, but in the spirit of trying to keep this as friendly as possible I'd appreciate if the user (Taximom) would be nice enough to self edit.

OP - post in the Selective and Delayed for supportive answers if this thread isn't what you were looking for (which I suspect it wasn't).  

Not assuming--you posted that medical history yourself:
Quote:
Originally Posted by prosciencemum View Post

Since HepB at brith has come up several times, I just wanted to comment that in the UK this is only offered at birth to babies of mothers who have tested positive for Hep B. It is available later at any age for children considered at high risk of exposure. 

My daughter was born in the US, but I'm pretty sure she didn't get it at birth either. I don't remember it ever coming up. 

You have also been clear that you now live in the UK, where vaccine recommendations and mandates are very, very different from those in the US.

Varicella vaccine is not part of the UK infant vaccination schedule. Rotavirus was only added in October of 2013. Both are on the US schedule for infants in the first year of life, with Rotavirus vaccine being given at 2, 4, and 6 months (in combination with FIVE other vaccines at age 2 months) and varicella vaccine being given at 12 months (in combination with at least 4 other vaccines, possibly 6, if flu shot and Hep A are given at this visit).

Flu shots are not part of the UK schedule for infants under the age of 2, whereas in the US, infants 6 and older receive 2 flu shots (often the thimerosal-preserved version) the first year, and one annually thereafter. The only flu vaccine recommended in the UK is the nasal mist, for children ages 2 and 3. At this time, flu vaccine is not part of the NHS schedule for children of any other age. http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/vaccinations/Pages/child-flu-vaccine.aspx

In fact, in the UK, vaccines are "offered," they are not mandatory, and unvaccinated children are not barred from schools as they are in the US.

I do recall you posting that you had been given the swine flu vaccine while pregnant--I believe that would have been in 2009 or early 2010, when the vaccine was only for swine flu and not yet combined with the seasonal flu shot? In the US, the "flu vaccine" is now a combination of swine flu vaccine and seasonal flu shot, which, according to Canadian studies, is more likely to result in coming down with the flu. It also seems to be linked with a higher rate of miscarriage, and health care workers in the US, even pregnant women, are fired if they refuse it. This does not happen in the UK.

I think it's completely relevant to point out inconsistencies. Your post, which I quoted, was phrased as a question, but clearly implied that someone who was "feeling chickenpox and flu vaccines aren 't worth it" was lying about a strongly held religious or moral belief. I think it's absolutely valid for me to point out that such an apparently judgmental post was coming from someone who is not faced with the same mandates/consequences as the OP, and whose children were not required to get those same vaccines as infants.
Edited by Taximom5 - 2/17/14 at 7:32am
post #44 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by prosciencemum View Post

I'm curious if "feeling chickenpox and flu vaccines aren 't worth it" (sic) would count as a strongly help religious or moral belief against vaccines. Does it?

 

 

​Who is qualified to cast the first stone- you? and how should your religious or morals be judged? 

post #45 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by prosciencemum View Post
 

I asked a  question about what counts as "a strong religious or moral objection" to vaccines, and in response a user posts assumptions (which actually are wrong in many places) about my and my children's medical history. And that's a contribution which two other users "like". I have my big girl pants on but I think that's a bit beyond even the debate threads. I have flagged it, but in the spirit of trying to keep this as friendly as possible I'd appreciate if the user (Taximom) would be nice enough to self edit.

 

 

PSM - I do not know if this will help or hurt….but to a degree I get where they are coming from.

 

PSM, your initial question did come across as a little passive aggressive.  I could be wrong, and if I am I apologise - but I am pretty sure you knew full well that asking if "this vaccine isn't worth it" (or whatever was said) is not a valid religious exemption.

 

Our country of origin can be relevant in these debates.  I think we are still entitled to an opinion and to express it,  but it is equally reasonable for someone to come on and say "You are not from here, you do not have to face what we have to face, you cannot fully understand."  It has happened to me on this forum and recently.  I was suggesting that universal health care might be a good idea for the states and was told that I did not live in the USA and could not grasp the implications of what I was suggesting. It was a valid point.

post #46 of 56

Back to the idea that if some of us post "kittens are cute" in these boards that would spark a huge debate. And apparently online stalking (to some minor degree) as well. 

 

Never mind. Probably a sign I need a break. 

post #47 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by prosciencemum View Post
 

Back to the idea that if some of us post "kittens are cute" in these boards that would spark a huge debate. And apparently online stalking (to some minor degree) as well. 

 

Never mind. Probably a sign I need a break. 

 

Nobody here is stalking you; if you are making such accusations, maybe you do need a break.

You posted a "question" that seemed to carry a great deal of negative judgment against mothers who are facing something you do not have to face--mandatory vaccination of their children, on a schedule that many feel is risky.

Many of us remember that you have posted that your children did not receive certain vaccines, such as hep B at birth, and that the UK (where you live) does not require that and many of the other vaccines required for US infants, including flu shots and chicken pox, which were the subject of the OP.

 

For you to post something judgmental against mothers who question shots that your children did not get is absolutely reason for comment--and heaven knows, pro-vaxers have demanded that vaccine critics provide proof of their points, so that's exactly what I did. That's not stalking; it's self-defense against those who would accuse me of making things up.

If you feel that it's perfectly fine and dandy for you to criticize mothers who are facing things you never had to, then go ahead and say so, and why you believe it to be so. But please don't change the subject via veiled accusations of stalking.  

post #48 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by ma2two View Post
 

 

So you do think it's okay for kids to be barred from a public education for a parent's vaccine choices. Got it.

 

I have stated several times in this forum that I am conflicted about requiring vaccinations for public schools.

post #49 of 56

Our pediatrician just wrote a letter stating that our son is on a special vaccine schedule which is being overseen by him. We'll be doing a couple of select vaccines when he's a little older and have been lucky to have a holistic pediatrician to back us up. For some reason a letter from an MD seems to shut people up pretty quickly. Good luck! 

post #50 of 56

Something to think about - if you don't want the government making vax decisions for you, why would you allow the government to care for and educate you child? I didn't have to vax my kids for medical reasons. I couldn't force them to go to school. 

post #51 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverinbluejeans View Post

Something to think about - if you don't want the government making vax decisions for you, why would you allow the government to care for and educate you child? I didn't have to vax my kids for medical reasons. I couldn't force them to go to school. 

Because maybe the government does some things well and other things poorly. shrug.gif Not everything is black and white. Criticizing facet of what the government does or mandates doesn't make you an anarchist.
post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by typebug View Post For some reason a letter from an MD seems to shut people up pretty quickly. Good luck! 

It is that G-d thing and the white coat.

post #53 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverinbluejeans View Post
 

Something to think about - if you don't want the government making vax decisions for you, why would you allow the government to care for and educate you child?

…….because they are not my children, they are the children of society and I along with others pay the cost in the end when reactions occur, I along with others pay the ultimate cost - what it does to society in the long run - I have a vested interest! 

post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickabiddy View Post
 

 

I have stated several times in this forum that I am conflicted about requiring vaccinations for public schools.

The issue is that in the US, anyway, children are required to go to some sort of school, and all schools, both public and private (at least in California) must use the same requirements. If vaccines are required for school, and school is required, what you're saying is that all children will be required to be vaccinated, unless they have a medical exemption (which in many states is extremely hard to get, and is often only for the vaccine to which a child has already had a life-threatening reaction).

post #55 of 56

In my state proof of vax or a valid exemption is required even to homeschool.

post #56 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamieCatheryn View Post
 

In my state proof of vax or a valid exemption is required even to homeschool.

:yeah  I do know of some who get around this a bit, but the Dept of Ed here has said they will back the schools if push comes to shove.

 

Sus

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