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CPS whistleblower (video) - Page 3

post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by preemieprincess View Post
 

A mom calls in to say, "I think my _____ (boyfriend/ older child/ neighbor, etc) has been sexually abusing my child," and the MOTHER can be charged with child abuse.
[/begin sarcasm] DUH, as a parent it's your job to protect your child at all times. What were you thinking leaving your kid with your father? [/end sarcasm]
I heard ^this^ from a family law attorney, who had represented several clients on cases where the aforementioned happened.

I think I mentioned her, but this happened to someone I know- she and her child's father were broken up, the child revealed to her therapist that hse was being molested at her dad's house, mom calls CPS- they investigated her and did nothing about the dad's house situation even after he kidnapped the child. Thankfully, she was able to raise money to hire a lawyer and go through family court directly to get her baby back and protections in place. That was just utterly appalling to me- it wasn't even a he-said/she-said, they had a therapist to attest to it and CPS still didn't want to hear it.

post #42 of 54

Well, all i can say is, i will be calling the police, not the CPS, if ever i suspected abuse in my own kids.

Thanks Gd for this thread, because i would not have known that.

Also, it looks like being a single mother might just be to my advantage....

post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by contactmaya View Post
 

Well, all i can say is, i will be calling the police, not the CPS, if ever i suspected abuse in my own kids.

Thanks Gd for this thread, because i would not have known that.

Also, it looks like being a single mother might just be to my advantage....


I think the police may defer to CPS, but I'm not really sure. Hopefully you'll never have to face it.

post #44 of 54

I feel that domestic abuse is somewhat similar to child abuse, so I share this story about my own experience with calling the police in regard to finding myself in a "domestic situation," as the police refer to it.

Partner ransacks the house, breaking furniture, throwing food at the wall, etc. The police (both men) arrive, and say, "Sweetheart, where are your bruises? You can file a civil suit for all the broken stuff, but breaking your stuff isn't domestic violence." I respond, "My father taught my sister and me to defend ourselves. Just because I'm strong and fast and ducked out of the way as he threw furniture at me, it's not abuse? By the way, my name is ____, do NOT call me sweetheart. Next time, should I let him knock my teeth out, officer?"

Fast forward to the end of the joke that was calling the police that night, they tell us to "kiss and make up" as they walk out the door.

Yeeeeah... don't know how much I'd trust the police to handle a child abuse situation, either.

No worries, I ended that relationship years ago.

post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by contactmaya View Post
 

Well, all i can say is, i will be calling the police, not the CPS, if ever i suspected abuse in my own kids.

Thanks Gd for this thread, because i would not have known that.

Also, it looks like being a single mother might just be to my advantage....


In many jurisdictions the police turn the situation over to CPS.

post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
 


In many jurisdictions the police turn the situation over to CPS.

In that case,  i would consult a lawyer before telling anyone. But then they would accuse me of covering up, so your damned if you do, and your damned if you dont.

 

Also, in the case of criminal prosecution, why would the police turn the case over to the CPS? The CPS are not qualified for  a criminal investigation. Do the police just drop the case when they turn it over to the CPS, or do they continue with a professional criminal investigation?  Presumably they continue doing the work  taxpayers pay them for. 

post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by preemieprincess View Post
 

I feel that domestic abuse is somewhat similar to child abuse, so I share this story about my own experience with calling the police in regard to finding myself in a "domestic situation," as the police refer to it.

Partner ransacks the house, breaking furniture, throwing food at the wall, etc. The police (both men) arrive, and say, "Sweetheart, where are your bruises? You can file a civil suit for all the broken stuff, but breaking your stuff isn't domestic violence." I respond, "My father taught my sister and me to defend ourselves. Just because I'm strong and fast and ducked out of the way as he threw furniture at me, it's not abuse? By the way, my name is ____, do NOT call me sweetheart. Next time, should I let him knock my teeth out, officer?"

Fast forward to the end of the joke that was calling the police that night, they tell us to "kiss and make up" as they walk out the door.

Yeeeeah... don't know how much I'd trust the police to handle a child abuse situation, either.

No worries, I ended that relationship years ago.

 

One of the websites i dug up that i quoted in this thread recommends telling the police over the CPS for a variety of reasons.

Let me find the website. again

post #48 of 54

  from

http://justicewomen.com/tips_bewarechildprotectiveservices.html  (in the state of California)

 

 

Quote

A. Tips on How and Where to Report Child Abuse

NOTE: If you are a mandated reporter outside California, please check your state's mandated reporting law to determine if your law, like California and many other states, allows mandated reporters the option of reporting to law enforcement rather than to CPS.

* Whether you are a mandated reporter, an advocate, or a non-offending parent who suspects child abuse, DO NOT report to child protective services unless other options have failed. (see above note.) Make your child abuse report to police or other law enforcement agency, at least initially.

The best way to protect the non-offending parent and the child victim from the inherent risks and abuses of the CPS system is to stay as far away from CPS as possible. If you are a mandated reporter, or any individual wishing to make a child abuse report, we highly recommend that you choose to make your report to law enforcement (i.e. to police or sheriff), and not to CPS....

 

End Quote

 

Theres alot more detail  on the website

 

Quote

....In broad summary, the criminal justice system responds to family violence, including child abuse, as crime. The criminal justice system aims to hold the offender accountable for the acts of child abuse, and to do so using a rigorous standard of evidence....

 

 

....In contrast, the CPS/juvenile court system is not designed to treat child abuse, or any family violence, as crime. The CPS system does not seek to hold the child abuse offender accountable, and has virtually no power to do so. CPS does not have the power to open, nor to carry out, a criminal investigation, does not have the power of arrest, nor does CPS have the power to prosecute perpetrators. The only significant power CPS has is the power to remove children from one or both parents...

 

Furthermore, the CPS system, unlike the criminal system, will frequently target the non-offending parent; i.e., will likely investigate the non-offending parent for non-criminal behavior such as 'failure to protect',......

 

.....NOTE 1: If you make your child abuse report to police, it may be that at one point or other the police themselves may call in CPS to participate in handling the case to one degree or another. However, even if CPS does begin to take a role in the case, the non-offending parent and the child will still generally be much better off than if you had only made your report to CPS. This is because the criminal system will generally continue to take the lead in the case....

 

.....In addition, any criminal justice abuses against the non-offending parent would be an individual officer failing to follow established policy. As such, this abuse would be easier to correct. The abuses of the CPS system against the non-offending parent, on the other hand, are built into the CPS system. When CPS unjustly targets the mother as subject of investigation, accusations, and threats to take the child, these abuses are difficult to correct with advocacy, because they fall within the scope of standard CPS policy and practice....

 

....If you make your initial child abuse report to law enforcement, it may be that the police officer will willingly take your report, work hard to investigate the case....

....But be aware. A significant number of police and prosecutors themselves still hold to the mind set that family violence should not be treated as a crime. Some of these officers will say and do whatever they can to get rid of you and the case, despite the fact that US state laws require that police treat family violence as crime. These officers may refuse to take the report, tell you to go elsewhere to make the report..........

 

..........If an officer outright refuses to take your report, or attempts to get you to make your report elsewhere, the best thing to do is to immediately call the officer's supervisor, or call the police agency's on-call sergeant, or the head of the family violence unit..........

post #49 of 54
post #50 of 54


That poor girl. It doesn't even sound like what's going on effects her mentally, at least not to the degree that she can't at least be involved in discussions about her life- but it sounds like everything is being done to her. Is that what she wants? If it is- then that's a big red flag that the parents may be part of the problem (it can happen). If it's not- that's just awful. 15 year olds can file for emancipation.

 

I'm also really concerned that she apparently had a diagnosis, and now (with a different doctor) her diagnosis is "we don't know what's wrong with her, so it's all in her head". I really don't like how a lot of medical things work in this country...

post #51 of 54
She just spent a year as a prisoner in a psych ward. It's hard to imagine she has much gumption left.

I always wish I could go around to all the involved people in cases likre these to try to ascertain all the facts. I never know who to believe.
post #52 of 54

When a family fights so hard to get their child back, when a parents lose custody for being angry at medical staff (how is that logical?), then i side with the family. Did the family lose custody because they were abusing their daughter, or because the father lost his temper? The article says the latter. Blame the journalist for lying i suppose, but then you have to wonder why they judge placed a gag order on the father....

 

My point is, sometime the facts that are known, speak for themselves.

post #53 of 54
It does make me curious why another daughter with the mito disorder was left in their care.
post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polliwog View Post

CPS is not one entity. Each state has it's own and it's often administered locally.

Yes, and I think it is very different in different regions of the U.S. I'm an unschooling, non-vaxing mom in Missouri and have had two different people make CPS reports against me, once in 2008 and once in 2011. In both cases, the social workers were very respectful to me and my family, and after brief visits, said they saw no reason to open a case.

 

Even though I'd previously heard the advice to refuse to let them in without a warrant, in both cases, my gut instinct told me that it was okay to go ahead and cooperate. And I am not the greatest housekeeper, but I went with my gut and let them come through the house. They were respectful in walking through the house with me and didn't even enter bathrooms or open cabinets or anything.

 

I carefully read through the paperwork they gave me, which they gave me a carbon copy of, and saw that, in both cases, I was signing a statement that my home was safe. I suppose that it wouldn't be a good idea to sign something if you have any reading comprehension issues, but it was all very easy and clear for me, personally.

 

But I don't think my positive experiences discount the horrid realities that some families have encountered. And I honestly don't know whether a third experience would be just as positive for me. I really think the best defense is just knowing our rights and then, if we're confronted with a situation, following our instincts about how to deal with it.

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