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This product makes me so sad - Page 2

post #21 of 64
It's amazing to see the lengths some people will go to avoid holding their babies.
post #22 of 64
That does look very stupid the way it works and is set up. BUT, I have to say I had one of the little universal snap-in carts that the "bucket" goes onto. It's at regular stroller height and faces the person pushing it. I did not like taking my kids out of the seat if they were asleep. I kept the cart dealy in the car and if I was running in-and-out errands with the baby, it kept me from having to wake them up a million times as we went. Then if they woke up I would take them out and put them in the sling or hold them.
post #23 of 64
What kills me about the ad is that the "benefits of use" are so stupid.

For grandparents who can't carry the bucket too far, to ease the effects of the walking motion (at least they are admitting that babies get tossed around in those things), etc.

All of these things could be solved with the right sling!

Ugh. Sad how ignorant people can be. I cannot IMAGINE putting my baby in such an unsafe looking contraption.
post #24 of 64
yuk, hate it hate it hate it
its just so impersonal
post #25 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoneymoonBaby
Okay, I don't like this thing any more than the rest of you, but it is advertised for QUICK TRIPS. ...
Exactly. If that's what it's used for, then I think it's a good thing but I'm sure a lot of people will use it excessively, which is sad.

I took many plane trips to visit family when my son was a baby. I had to have the carseat with me, because my son always had his own seat that I strapped him into during take-off and landing. Honestly, I could have used this thing. Pushing the baby in the carseat, with a diaper bag over one shoulder and my bag over another shoulder would have been a lot easier on my back (& sanity) then my usual routine of hauling the bags plus the baby and the carseat from gate to gate.
post #26 of 64
[QUOTE=Sheena]gag me. that is not only sad but weird; it's like baby luggage.

Dh and I saw a woman with one of these when we were on vacation last week and he referred to it as "their baby suitcase." Silly.
post #27 of 64
Darn, I hoped it would be something to litterally DRAG my child around with.

Are my kids the only ones who love to be drug on linolium/wood? LOL I'd do it in a minute if it was for the 30-60 lb child! Not easier than a sling, but easier than walking with your child grabbing your ankle as they drag along on their belly and people stare at you (PICK UP THAT CHILD)--- they don't want picked up
post #28 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiredX2
Darn, I hoped it would be something to litterally DRAG my child around with.

Are my kids the only ones who love to be drug on linolium/wood? LOL I'd do it in a minute if it was for the 30-60 lb child! Not easier than a sling, but easier than walking with your child grabbing your ankle as they drag along on their belly and people stare at you (PICK UP THAT CHILD)--- they don't want picked up
: You crack me up! Hey... have I told you how much I love your sig line? Are you from/in Canada?
post #29 of 64
Using the handle, you can rock your child without having to bend down


: if it weren't so
post #30 of 64
The thing I had was like this, but less fancy. My mom got it at a yardsale for $10 new in the box!
post #31 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiredX2
they don't want picked up
T You are from Pennsylvania. You have TO BE. People from Pennsylvania are the only people I know who say "don't want picked up" as opposed to "don't want TO BE picked up." My roommate before I got married was from Pittsburgh and she never used the words "TO BE." It was always "My car needs washed." "That guy needs smacked." "That baby needs held." I thought she was the only one until she met her now-husband, who is from Philly and talks the same way. Since then, I've met a lot more people who leave out "TO BE" from their daily vocabulary, and they have ALL been from Pennsylvania.

Drove me up a frickin' wall . . . . :LOL I used to joke that the Pennsylvania version of that soliloquy in Hamlet was . . . "Or not? That is the question."

So anyway . . . am I right about your location, or what?
post #32 of 64
Lol, people in the southeast say that too.
post #33 of 64
Tupelo Honey - I used the exact same thing you did for the same reason, to avoid waking ds (and turning him into a screaming ds) just to pop into the bank. Awake babies travel in my arms, sleeping babies travel where they lie, whether that's a carseat, sling, or on my shoulder!

But those ones so low to the ground are horrible. I've seen toddler carseats that convert into a stroller, and they look the same as this kind of thing. I've always thought those were disgusting - I could never have my kid that low to the ground!
post #34 of 64
What I really don't get is how they can charge $70 for that??????
post #35 of 64
people use these things but think *i'm* weird?
post #36 of 64
that's wretchid!!! poor babies! aren't those idiots scared someone will step on their babies down there in the gross floor???? ew! how sad too
post #37 of 64
Wow that's a terrible product! And so expensive! I've seen a cheap stroller frame thing that you can put an infant seat in-- it puts the baby at a much higher level and looks much safer than that gadget.

Darshani
post #38 of 64
hee hee..
you guys are the cutest. It's sweet that this contraption could upset someone so much!
Now, lemme tell ya somethin': My fat breast-milk-hog nearly killed all the nerves in my right shoulder when I carried her in her sling, so her dad and my mom were about the only ones who used it. Dreamer that I am, I'm buying another sling for the bun-in-the-oven.... but seriously, there were times I would have KILLED for something- G*d, ANYTHING to drag my little meatloaf around in! Of course, I used the stroller for that, but maybe if I had to travel this wouldn't be such a terrible idea. Of course I might worry about people bumping or kicking it, but as far as dogs & not being able to see the baby... those things are true of strollers, as well, right? I guess I just hesitate to judge the weird-seeming things that other moms do, since they might turn around and accuse me of abuse for not vaxing my daughter on the "well-baby" schedule, or for letting her run around naked in the yard.
I remember how I used to react whenever I saw one of those Baby-Leashes... you know what I'm talking about... and yes, they are quite distressing. But when Olivia first started walking I took her to the mall one day, and she thought it would be funny to duck behind a makeup counter for a little hide-n-seek. she was less than 10 feet away from me and I am not stretching things: I told her she had until the count of three, or I was coming to get her. By three, she had run across the sales floor, hopped on to the escalator and cruised to the second floor. By the time security found her the iron gates had come down, all the outside doors were locked and people were running around with walkie-talkies... she took 10 years off my life in a matter of seconds.
She's usually a very good listener, so thankfully I never had to actually buy one of those leash-things, but I feel like I've walked a little bit in the shoes of those harried, worn-out leash moms, as well as those torn-rotator-cuff "baby-suitcase" moms...
and just an anecdote: when I was a baby and slinging was practically unheard of in most parts, my mom used to carry me around in an old dress-sash tied around her shoulder. One day, she was at the supermarket and two older ladies walked by. They looked at each other in disgust and one said to the other (as loud as can be, just so my mother would hear): "I wouldn't carry a DOG like that!" I wish I could go back in time in b*tch-slap them! Oh well, they're probably dead now, anyway. And then there's my grandmother who breast-fed her oldest for mere weeks before her family shamed her out of it, telling her it was dirty. She formula-fed her babies from then on.
So sure, it's a little weird to see somebody dragging their baby along behind them.. but ladies, when you're about and about with a three-year-old boy on your breast, what do you think those Enfamil/Disney-Store-type-moms are thinking about you? They're thinking exactly what you're thinking: that child is going to have problems when he grows up. But you know what? Your baby will probably just grow up wanting to drink water out of a sports-bottle and not knowing why. And when the suitcase-baby grows up, he'll probably just end up really liking para-sailing, and not knowing why. It'll just be our secret.
post #39 of 64
why do I only have that kind of stamina at 2 in the morning? I will start publishing cliffs notes for my posts from now on. sorry!
post #40 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoneymoonBaby
T You are from Pennsylvania. You have TO BE. People from Pennsylvania are the only people I know who say "don't want picked up" as opposed to "don't want TO BE picked up." My roommate before I got married was from Pittsburgh and she never used the words "TO BE." It was always "My car needs washed." "That guy needs smacked." "That baby needs held." I thought she was the only one until she met her now-husband, who is from Philly and talks the same way. Since then, I've met a lot more people who leave out "TO BE" from their daily vocabulary, and they have ALL been from Pennsylvania.

Drove me up a frickin' wall . . . . :LOL I used to joke that the Pennsylvania version of that soliloquy in Hamlet was . . . "Or not? That is the question."

So anyway . . . am I right about your location, or what?
I grew up in Philadelphia and I don't talk like that! Is your friend's husband from the city or the 'burbs of Philly?
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