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Speaking of hands and fingers and sensitivity. . .

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 
. . .here's something else folks might find useful in their efforts to enlighten others.



"Before and After Circumcision: An Educational Model of Penile Skin Movement"
by Gary Harryman & Andrew C. Kursar

An educational exercise in two parts.

Part one -- the "gliding action":

Hold out your left hand, palm down, fingers together, flat, and pointed away from you. Place the index finger of your right hand on the back of your left hand about in the middle of the back of the palm. Press down with that index finger using moderate pressure and slide the skin on the back of the left hand around in a circle.

Notice how the skin slides smoothly over the substrate of the hand? Notice how you can feel the skin itself extending and compressing, and how you can feel it sliding against the substrate below? That's similar to what the mobile foreskin does on the erect penis; it slides all around, and up and down, in a roller-bearing fashion.

Now, while still moving the skin around in a circle, slowly close the extended fingers of your left hand into a fist. Notice how the skin under your index finger tightens up as the fingers close, and how it stops sliding around? Notice how the sensory input and your perception of it changes from the complex movement of the skin itself, and its simultaneous movement against the irregular substratum, to only frictional input from your index finger as it moves around in a circle on the back of the fist? Notice how that changes your perception and focus from the many things that are occurring under the loose skin to just the friction that is occurring under your index finger against the tight skin.

That's what happens when the foreskin is amputated -- the more severe the circumcision (that is, the greater the genital reduction), the tighter the remaining skin on the penis. The tighter the remaining skin on the penis, the less it moves. The less it moves, the more the penis receives only frictional input. The more the penis receives only frictional input, the more need there is for primarily rougher thrusting motions and a tighter fit to stimulate it.

Now, while still rubbing the index finger around on the back of the first hand, slowly unclench the fist again. Notice how the the skin glides smoothly over the substrate again? Notice how you can feel the skin itself stretching and compressing, and how you can feel it sliding against the substrate below?

If you balance out the pressure you apply with your index finger against the greatest range of movement of the skin, so that the mobile skin is sliding around in a circle and the index finger is rubbing against the skin itself as well, you can feel both the skin movement itself, and the frictional input of the index finger moving against it -- simultaneously. That's what the intact foreskin normally does on the erect penis; it slides around, and up and down, in a similar fashion, and at the same time receives frictional input from the surface it is rubbing against. That unique ability is called the "gliding action" and it is the hallmark mechanical feature of the normal intact (whole) human penis. Without this gliding action, sex as nature designed it is impossible.

Part two -- innervation:

Rub the back of your hand again; then, turn your hand over and lightly rub the palm in the same way. Notice how the palm is many times more sensitive than the back of the hand, and how the sensation is qualitatively different, having much more of a tickling or tingling nature?

This is because the palm of your hand has some of the same nerves that the normal intact foreskin has, and they are between 10 and 20 times more sensitive than the nerves on the back of your hand, or those on the shaft and glans of the circumcised penis; specialized pleasure-producing nerve endings such as coiled fine-touch Meissner's corpuscles, encapsulated pressure- and vibration-sensitive Vater Pacini cells, Merkel's touch-receptor cells, temperature-sensitive nocioceptors, and branches of two nerve stems.

Through non-surgical foreskin restoration a man can reclaim most of the "Part one" experience, and, depending on how much of his original foreskin remains and if his frenulum is still intact, perhaps some of the "Part two" experience.

However, those specialized pleasure-producing nerves that have been removed, and the way in which their normal functioning would interact with the sensations of the "Part one" gliding motion, are lost forever.

Copyright 2003 Gary Harryman & Andrew C. Kursar
post #2 of 2
Thank you Andrew; That is a demonstration I can always have with me
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