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Poll: When is it ok for you to mother-lead wean? - Page 8

Poll Results: when is it ok to mother-lead wean?

 
  • 15% (35)
    at anytime that the mother wants to wean (from birth on)
  • 32% (73)
    from 12 months on
  • 36% (81)
    from 24 months on
  • 5% (12)
    from 3 years on
  • 4% (10)
    from 4 years on
  • 4% (11)
    never, it's not ok to mother-lead wean
222 Total Votes  
post #141 of 145
link to Parents Place article
Quote:
Breastfeeding may decrease the rate of PPD, or lessen its impact. A 1994 study by Astbury, published in an Australian medical journal found the rates of PPD to be lower in women who had nursed their babies.

It is known that abrupt weaning (or not nursing following a baby's birth) can cause drastic changes in a mother's hormone levels, which may bring on sadness and even depression. It is recommended that weaning be done gradually, especially in mothers who are prone to PPD.
I don't have time to do more research but feel free to google it yourself if you're interested in finding out more.
post #142 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quirky
link to Parents Place article


I don't have time to do more research but feel free to google it yourself if you're interested in finding out more.
We're getting pretty far afield from the OP, but...

I did google the topic, and didn't see much more than this article describing potential benefits of breastfeeding on PPD (and actually, this article didn't tell me much--were the lower PPD rates in breastfeeding mothers due to breastfeeding protecting against/helping diminish PPD, or because women with PPD tend not to breastfeed? I'd have to see the actual study to more accurately assess what it says). So I'm still not sure what the claim that breastfeeding helps PPD is based on....

There were lots of articles on the safety of antidepressants during breastfeeding. It's good to see that so many of the commonly-prescribed meds are believed to be safe for use during nursing.

One other article is by Karen Kleiman, MSW, a PPD specialist. She talks about how breastfeeding *can be* beneficial for women with PPD--but also how the pressure to breastfeed can be detrimental. She doesn't cite any hard stats, but brings an expert perspective to the issue. It's an interesting read:

http://www.storknet.com/cubbies/ppd/...astfeeding.htm
post #143 of 145
In regards to the OP, I was grateful that according to approximately 85% of the people who voted it is ok for me to MLW now. Not that I am ready, but it makes me feel better to know that people won't be judging me if it does come to that.

Mothering your Nursing Toddler implies that to stop offering nursies to your child is MLW. The recommended MLW technique (if you must...) is don't offer, don't refuse. I am going to stop offering in the next few months.

I can't really say I'll be doing the don't offer, don't refuse method, because even now I do refuse at times just because I get tired of them popping on and off a dozen times in a half hour, but I usually give in. So I can't say I'll never refuse, but I'll never cut them off cold turkey for sure. I like our morning and evening nursies. It is the millions of popons in between that I could live without.
post #144 of 145
Quote:
The recommended MLW technique (if you must...) is don't offer, don't refuse.
But I do this with my infant and I am not trying to wean her. I don't offer her the breast when she doesn't seem to need anything; I wait for her to start making her hungry faces and sounds. And of course I don't refuse.

I did the same with my oldest when she was about 18 mos - I didn't offer, I waited until she started pulling at my shirt. I wasn't trying to wean then either.
post #145 of 145

formula feeding

I most definitely do not want to be congratulated for using formula or told that it's a great thing, since I already know it's not. And I wouldn't want to go to other boards even if I did want support for that, because MDC its more in line with my parenting values and beliefs.

Also, I knew when I quit that it might worsen my PPD, but at that time I had no choice. I am NOT passing on myths about that, I am sharing what really happened to me. I am a real person with a real story and this is it. I know people don't want to hear it. It would be nicer to believe that anyone who wants to can bf with a bit of information and persistence, but mentally, I HAD to quit, and looking back at how difficult it was for my son to bf I am still glad I did for his sake and the sake of our relationship. There is nothing quite so heartbreaking as seeing your baby cry and fuss every single time you try to feed him, and feeling yourself sinking into an abyss and feeling like a crappy mother and a failure.

I never expected to have such a hard time being understood here, but there you go. I just want to say again, asking for some sensitivity and correcting some misperceptions about when breastfeeding really can and cannot occur are not the same as asking for support of formula. I''m sorry that I apparently wasn't very good at making the distinction.

I truly wish there was a bf grief forum here. It is really needed.



Quote:
Originally Posted by TiredX2
I am sorry you are upset.

I appologize or retract nothing I have said on this thread.

If you want to PM me for further clarification, please do so.



We have acknowledged this over and over.

Society acknowledges this multiple times on a daily basis (just think of the reasons listed in the popular media that celebrities give up bfeeding for).

There is no lack of support for forumla usage.

Supporting formula is not my job and I refuse to be guilted into doing so.

Honestly, while I would never ask someone to leave, I think if you can't hear statements such as, "Formula Fed children have more heath problems then their breastfed counterparts" without becomming defensive of your parenting, this is probably not the place for you *right now*.

(PPD is actually usually *helped* by nursing, please don't pass on further myths. Each mother can decide to feed in the way they want, but don't state "reasons" for FFeeding that could just as easily be reasons to bfeed).

Kay
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