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Coffee....argh!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Is anyone else struggling with the coffee issue? I feel so guilty, I am still hooked. I gave it up with my first pregnancy with zero problems, but this time I am really struggling. I am 10 weeks today, and still drinking a cup every morning (ya know, the big coffee cup that probably in reality equals two actual cups, LOL). I guess I am going to try brewing decaf instead so I still have something in my hand at the computer in the morning. I feel like such a loser!
post #2 of 9
I wish! With my first pg I toned down to 1/2 regular and 1/2 decaf, about 2 big 'ol cups every morning so that's what I did this time around too. But apparently this babe has other ideas and I had to give it up entirely because it was making me so sick! Yes, if any of you read about my m/s, I found out that it was the coffee, dammit. I dream of coffee. And am hoping to have a cup or two here and there once I hit the 2nd trimester.

So, Naomi, my personal perspective is that so long as your not chugging caffeine all day a little bit in the morning is fine.
post #3 of 9
I have been very good - not even drinking decaf - but I have been craving it to no end. Especially when hubby has just brewed it or I pass a Starbucks at a vulnerable time. I did break down and have some coffee ice cream recently - I figured at least that way I was getting the dairy and the caffeine might be less (?). I am definitely going to have some decaf in a few weeks when I am feeling better about the pregnancy (still worried about m/c of course).
post #4 of 9
MMmmmm..... Java Chip Frappacino (sp?) from Starbucks.

I haven't had one in a while, but I have had a few coca-colas throughout the week. I think it's okay to have some caffeine, as long as it's in moderation. And keep in mind it stays in your system for about 6hrs. So maybe one a day, if that, would be okay.


Here's an article from http://www.ctispregnancy.org/pdf/caffeine.pdf
Quote:
What is caffeine?
Caffeine is a stimulant found in many foods and beverages. It is also found in
prescription and over the counter medications. Caffeine is a naturally occurring substance found in the leaves, seeds, and fruits of more than 60
plants.
How much caffeine is in common foods and drinks?
A few examples of caffeinated items include: 8oz. cup of coffee (65-120mg of
caffeine), brewed tea (20-90mg), 12oz. Coke (45mg), 1 cup of Haagen-Dazs coffee ice cream (58mg), Hershey chocolate bar (10mg), 8oz. hot chocolate (5mg), and 2 tablets of Excedrin (130mg). Some herbals such as guarana also
contain caffeine.
What exactly does caffeine do to my body?
Caffeine’s main effect is increased alertness. Within 1 hour of coffee consumption, caffeine usually reaches its peak level in the bloodstream and remains there for 4-6 hours. Caffeine also stimulates secretion of acid in the
stomach, sometimes resulting in an upset stomach. Caffeine is also a diuretic, which means it helps eliminate fluids from the body and can result in water and calcium loss.
I am trying to become pregnant. Is it true that drinking caffeinated beverages will lower my chance to become pregnant?
Results from studies have been mixed. Some studies have suggested that high levels of caffeine (>300mg/day) may make it harder to
conceive, but these findings are not proven. Low to moderate caffeine consumption (<300mg/day) does not seem to reduce a woman’s chance of becoming pregnant.
I am pregnant. Is it safe for me to continue drinking coffee and soda?
Most experts agree that moderation and common sense are the keys for consuming caffeinated items during pregnancy. “Moderate” caffeine consumption is approximately 300mg/day, which is similar to 3 cups of coffee.
It is also important for pregnant women to drink sufficient quantities of water, milk and juice. These fluids should not be replaced with caffeinated beverages.
Does caffeine cause or contribute to miscarriage?
Researchers have had difficulty determining whether there is a relationship
between caffeine and miscarriage since miscarriage is very common. Recent reports suggest that low to moderate consumption of caffeine does not increase the risk for miscarriage. A few studies have shown that there may be an increased risk for miscarriage with high caffeine consumption (>300 mg/day), particularly in combination with smoking or alcohol, or with very high levels of caffeine consumption (>800 mg/day).
Will drinking caffeinated beverages during my pregnancy cause birth defects in my baby?
No. In humans, even large amounts of caffeine have not been shown to cause an increased chance for birth defects.
I drink 5-6 cups of coffee a day and I am 7 months pregnant. Will this higher amount affect my baby?
Caffeine does cross the placenta; therefore higher amounts of caffeine could affect babies in the same way as it does adults. Some reports have stated that children born to mothers who consumed >500mg/day were more likely to have faster heart rates, tremors, increased breathing rate, and spend more time awake in the days following birth.
Is it a problem if my baby’s father consumed a lot of caffeine when I became pregnant?
Very little information is available on the effects of caffeine on sperm. One report stated that caffeine seems to increase the motility (movement) of sperm. Currently there are no other known effects on pregnancy.
Can I drink caffeinated beverages while I breast feed?
Caffeine is excreted in breast milk, but there is very little information on how it might affect the baby. When breastfeeding, caffeine consumption should be limited. Women should remain well hydrated with water, juice and milk
while breastfeeding.




And here's another article I found at http://www.babycenter.com/refcap/3955.html

Quote:
Do I have to give up caffeine now that I'm pregnant?
Not necessarily. You can still enjoy your favorite caffeinated drinks as long as you don't overdo it. Research suggests that moderate amounts of caffeine won't harm you or your baby during pregnancy. Researchers define moderate as 300 to 400 milligrams (mgs) of caffeine, about what you'd get in three to four 8 oz. cups of coffee or seven to nine cans of cola.

However, many pregnant women limit their intake even further or cut out caffeine completely. If that seems wise to you, you won't get any arguments from your midwife or doctor.

Is it dangerous to get more than the moderate amount of caffeine during pregnancy?
No one really knows for sure, but a study published in February 2003 by Danish researchers did find an association between heavy coffee consumption — between four and seven cups a day — and an increased rate of stillbirth.

Earlier research is both confusing and inconsistent about the effects of drinking more than three or four cups of coffee a day. Some studies have linked miscarriage, low birthweight, and birth defects such as cleft palate to large amounts of caffeine. But much of this research failed to take into account other risk factors such as smoking and alcohol, which can also lead to complications in pregnancy, labor, and delivery.

What exactly does caffeine do to my body?
For starters, no matter which form it's in, food or beverage, caffeine is a nutritional loser. It contains absolutely no vitamins or minerals.

Caffeine is also a stimulant; it increases your heart rate and metabolism, which in turn stresses your developing baby. But while unremitting stress isn't healthy, brief bouts of fetal stress, such as that your baby would feel after you drink a cup of coffee, won't cause him any harm. It's akin to your dashing to the bus, another situation that briefly boosts your heart rate and metabolism.

Anyone who drinks coffee regularly knows that it's addictive and that large amounts can also cause insomnia, nervousness, and headaches. And it's a diuretic, which causes you to lose water and other fluids and calcium, all of which you need to maintain a healthy pregnancy. Caffeine also hampers your body's ability to absorb iron — by as much as 40 percent if you drink it within one hour of a meal.

Which foods and beverages contain caffeine?
More than you might think — and caffeine hides in nonfood items as well. Chocolate and some nonherbal teas have caffeine. Some over-the-counter drugs, including headache and cold tablets, stay-awake medications, and allergy remedies also contain caffeine.

Even the amount of caffeine in coffee and tea varies widely, ranging from 30 to 150 mgs per cup depending on whether the coffee grounds or tea leaves are brewed or instant, weak or strong. Sodas vary too, and you can't assume that a so-called noncola doesn't have caffeine; many do. Check the chart below for caffeine amounts in some common foods and beverages.

You might be surprised at how easily you can get a big dose of caffeine. This chart highlights just a few common foods, drinks, and drugs that contain the stimulant.

Item Amount Caffeine
Diner coffee 8 ounces 350 mg
Gourmet coffee 8 ounces 175 mg
Brewed coffee 5 ounces 105 to 115 mg
Espresso single 100 mg
Cappuccino single 100 mg
Instant coffee 6 ounces 57 mg
Decaffeinated coffee 5 ounces 5 mg
Brewed tea 6 ounces 20 to 110 mg
Iced Tea 12 ounces 70 mg
Instant Tea 7 ounces 30 mg
Cola 1 12-ounce can 30 to 56 mg
Diet cola 1 12-ounce can 38 to 45 mg
Non-cola 1 12-ounce can 54 mg
Sprite and 7-Up 1 12-ounce can 0 mg
Chocolate 2 ounces 10 to 50 mg
Cocoa 1 5-ounce cup 4 mg
Diet pills (such as Dexatrim) 1 100 to 200 mg
No-Doz 1 100 to 200 mg
Pain relievers
(such as Anacin, Excedrin) 1 30 mg and up


I'd like to kick the caffeine habit -- just to be safe. Any tips?
You may find your taste buds doing the cutting back for you. Many women find their fondness for a cup of joe evaporates during the first trimester when the queasies strike.

Otherwise, to reduce the caffeine in homemade hot beverages, brew them for a shorter time. If you love a soothing cup of Earl Grey, steeping your tea bag for just one minute instead of five reduces the caffeine by as much as half. Many tea companies now offer decaffeinated black or green teas. Although herb teas often have no caffeine, make sure to read the ingredients list — you'll want to avoid large amounts of caffeine as well as certain herbs and additives that may not be safe during pregnancy.

If you're a devoted coffee or caffeinated soda fan, caffeine withdrawal isn't easy. To minimize symptoms, which include headaches, fatigue, and lethargy, ease off gradually. Cut back by half a cup of the beverage each day. You can also try switching from brewed to instant coffee.

If coffee fills an emotional need, such as your private coffee break, or if it's an early morning ritual or the perfect end to a meal, switch to a cup of decaffeinated coffee or tea. If you're hankering for an ice-cold cola, reach for the caffeine-free version, or better yet, try a glass of mineral water with a spritz of lime.
post #5 of 9
I switched to decaf from the get-go and have not really noticed much of a difference...of course I get a foo-foo latte type coffee and add some raw sugar and sprinkle some chocolate and cinnamon on top It's the ritual more than anything that is important to me...going to my favorite coffee shop everymorning and saying hi to my buddies is just as important as the drink itself. Can't wait to tell them the good news in a few more weeks!!!

It's Diet Coke I find myself missing the most, I guess, but don't think I'll ever go back to my 2-3 sodas a day habit.
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all of the info littlebeagle. I know the research doesn't prove anything negative, but when I am making decisions for two, I would like to feel 100% good about them, ya know? Like you mentioned speedknitter, it is the ritual more than the caffeine. I'm going grocery shopping this afternoon, I am going to buy some decaf!
post #7 of 9
I am growing baby #4, amd I confess, I have never given up coffe or tea. I ahve a triple latte in the AM, and usually a cuppa Earl Grey in the afternoon. It has not caused any problems.
post #8 of 9
I still drink a big cup of 1/2 reg and 1/2 decaf every morning and did during pg with DS (and on through our nursing relationship as well.) I wouldn't sweat it as long as you only have a moderate amount and are otherwise well hydrated...
post #9 of 9

Oh Man, this thread is making me drool! I've pretty much given up coffee, I think I've had two mochas in the last 2 months. But I sure miss it! Especially in the AM, when DH is making his stovetop espresso <sigh>!

But now I think I'll go make some decaf, just one little tiny cup . . .
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