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Mamas w/food allergic children - Page 2

post #21 of 178
We have food allergies here,my daughter and myself both have to eat gluten free and dairy free.I also have allergies to nuts and eggs and strawberries.It's hard to find things we can eat.
post #22 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*max*~
Zipperump, w/your dc's peanut allergy, is she/he also allergic to other nuts? My ds eats peanutbutter every day & I am wondering if that too could be an allergen?
Hey! He is not allergic to other nuts, although we steer clear because of cross contamination and also because I'm not that confident that he could see a nut and determine if it was a peanut or not. I just don't want to go there, kwim?

On the allergy/food sensitivity thing: one thing I worry about is that people will acidentally (or acidental-done-on-purpose ) give a child something that he/she is sensitive to. Then, when there is no immediate allergic response (IGE mediated) they will assume that the mother is exagerating and ignore the warning for the thing that the child is actually IGE allergic to, causing anaphylaxis.

One other thing: If you think your child is IGE mediated allergic to something (rash, swelling, anaphylaxis, etc.) would highly highly highly recommend getting a rast or elisa done. I realise that they are allopathic, but for me it has made a dramatic difference in the cooperation I get from family and friends (the epi pen is scary looking, no? ) Also, I had no idea he was IGE allergic to peanuts until we had testing done for food sensitivities. With IGE allergies, they can be very mild to non-existant reactions for multiple exposures and then with no warning become very severe. So, if you think peanut butter might be causing a mild rash I would get a test to find out if it is IGE allergy because a severe allergic reaction could happen without advance warning.
Kaly
post #23 of 178
Max, sorry! I meant email lists for people dealing with food issues. Go to yahoogroups.com and search for food allergies or food sensitivities or elimination diet, etc. I'm sorry I can't recommend any. Once we got the hang of it I unsubbed so it's been awhile.

I missed that you know the allergen. We did an elimination diet to find what the problem was. *That* is the PITB You take everything that can possibly be a problem out of the diet and then slowly, one by one, you add them back in. Yeah, it took months and was annoying. If you are still having problems with him you might want to keep a food log or something to see if you can detect any patterns. Though for some kids, they can eat a food and react for days so you can't tell - my dd is pretty straight forward in that she acts up within an hour or two and it's over by the time she wakes the next day.

pilesoflaundry (Jackie), how far along are you in the elimination of dairy? I'm just curious how it's going. Is he eating other foods yet or have you just begun?
post #24 of 178
I did think of this thread today. We were at the supermarket and they had samples of soy milk and, the same brand name, samples of cookies. As we walked past the woman asked if we could have a cookie and I politely said no. Oh, my dd's face. Then I reminded her that we were there to get ingredients to MAKE cookies and she perked up :LOL (of course the cookies we made had butter and I'm also lactose intolerant so I'm not a happy camper but they were yummy and my kids were happy so there you go )
post #25 of 178
I totally understand that one Shannon... Brandon can't hang out in the children's room at MOPS because they eat graham crackers and spill crumbs everywhere...and today at the library they were using homemade playdough...he can't use that either because it was made with flour. I feel bad for him, even though he's so young. I just know this isn't the hardest it gets...
post #26 of 178
Shannon- we are one week into things and I have already slipped up once oops. It's hard to get into the habit of reading every single label to make sure there is no hidden dairy. My toddler is milk protein intolerant so she can handle small amounts of hidden dairy ok. It's raw milk, ice cream etc that bugs her. She can have cooked milk ok if it's a small amount in a recipe. The artificial colors and flavors are a lot easier to avoid than the dairy!

I need to find an alternative milk for him for at least cooking with because he loves things like mashed potatoes. I'm not ok with him having soy and my toddler is allergic to that also so I don't want to even have it in the house. I've tried rice milk and neither of them will drink it so it's either almond milk or darifree potato milk.
post #27 of 178
Thread Starter 

Naturopath?

Has anyone done allergy testing through a naturopath? I just spoke w/a local naturopath. He said they do (let's see if I get this right...) an IGG blood test to determine food allergies & sensitivities, then implememnt a rotation diet, & possibly other interventions to help heal the gut. They charge $125 for initial apt., then $60. for subsequent visits. The blood test will cost around $150. Does this sound like a typical naturopathic intervention? Honestly, I know nothing about naturopathic treatment, but from what I have read it sounds like it could be helpful.

My biggest reservation is the blood test. That will be torturous for ds, who doesn't even like to be touched by our pediatrician. I am also concerned about the rotation diet - ds eats such limited foods already, and I will need to be food police around anyone else who may feed him. The $ is also a factor, but if it will help ds, I will gladly spend it.

So,,,,,,,,, any thoughts?

TIA,
max
post #28 of 178
We did IGG testing. We did a rotation diet. Nothing made a difference- ended up being a combo of a dust mite allergy and a reaction to the zillions of supplements we had him on trying to make him better (vit c, echinacea, liccorice root and cod liver oil tablets). Afterwards I looked into the validity and reliability of the IGG test, and I did not find much to go on. (Apparently, each lab tests for the presence of igg differently. One lab may find one result and the same blood sample tested by a different lab may find an entirely different result. Even the same blood sample tested twice by the same lab resulted in two different reccomendations about what food to eliminate.) I will look for the report and see if I can link it for you.
Kaly
post #29 of 178
My dd is allergic to peanuts and tree nuts, and some inhaleants(sp?).
She has dark circles under her eyes, which is typical for persons with allergies.
She carries an Epi-pen in her school bag, and I carry one in my bag. She also wears a Medic-Alert bracelet.
I've read that about 15 to 20% of those affected, grow out of it! Please let that be my girl! :
I have yet to find out if ds is allergic to anything. I pray he's not! Although, he has dark circles under his eyes too...
I would love to hear about anyone that has out grown an allergy!
post #30 of 178
Hey atomicmama! I would love to know how you approached the school thing. Were the teachers receptive? DS is not in school yet, and I know the peanut thing is becoming more common so I am hoping that by the time he comes to school age where ever he goes will have seen it all before. But giving up that control kind of freaks me out, ya know?

Also, how do you deal with the peanut butter sandwiches in public thing? It buts the crap out of me when I see parents giving their kids pb sandwiches in places that are supposedly no-food places (our latest encounter with this was at the science center's water play area ). My son knows he's allergic and knows what to stay away from, but the thought that some kid has pb all over his hands and then runs to play with all this stuff my son is playing with scares me. I don't think he's that allergic, but you never know who there is. (and I fully expect and have no problem with it in typical eating places, but you're not even supposed to be eating there! )
Kaly
post #31 of 178
Our chiropractor gave us an IGG test --interesting to read that myabe they are not that reliable! I would love to read that study, too.

Anyway, we found out that ds was sensitive to about 30 different foods and tried to cut them all out but found it really was impossible (they include all oils but olive, all citrus, all beans!, etc.....). However, we had cut so much out of his diet and were eating so much better anyway (mostly meat, fruit and veg) that the chiro said we'd still be ok, and to keep up the good work. Ds does seem to be doing much better since last spring when we first went on the "Caveman diet" -- we spent the weekend in FLorida and he ate a lot of bad things (crackers, cake, etc.) without any real ill effects.

BTW, the blood draw was not bad. Maybe with somebody different it would be better?
post #32 of 178
Ok, I found the article- it's from Bastyr, so I'd expect it to come from a fairly pro-alternative therapies standpoint.

http://www.tldp.com/issue/174/IgG%20Food%20Allergy.html

I don't know how to make that a link, sorry!
Kaly
post #33 of 178
Hi! I'm new to MDC and just saw this thread.

I'm one of the epi pen carrying mamas! Our son (age 5) is fatally allergic to milk, egg, peanuts, and nuts. He will hive out, swell up and stop breathing if he eats, drinks or touches anything which contains those foods. We have known about his allergies since he was 12 months when he ate a piece of donut and went into respiratory distress. It was terrifying!

We use Epi Pens, medic alert bracelets and shoe tags, and www. foodallergy.org as resources in our life with food allergy. I'm so glad to find this thread and read what others of you are doing.

My eldest son has a sensitivity to milk and to sugar. He reacts behaviourally. We have just figured that out (he's 9) and are elminating those things from his diet. The milk was not hard since we are milk free allready. But the sugar!!! That's been harder!

Good to meet you all!
post #34 of 178
Thread Starter 
Thank you for the article Zipperump. That really solidifies the feedback that I have been getting about IgG testing. I think I am going to stick w/what I have been doing for now - single food eliminations, hitting the major foods that ds regularly eats, and then take it from there. So far, we know dairy causes hives/rash, inattention, impulsiveness & aggression. I am working on peanutbutter now. Wheat is going to be a tough one - there is wheat in so much that he eats. I'll also test citrus & apples.

It's been almost 3 weeks since we have eliminated dairy, and ds is such a different boy. He is happier, more talkative, has a better appetite, sleeps better, much less melting down, and in school he is able to focus, complete tasks and gets along better w/peers. It really is amazing. All this from eliminating dairy! The reason I think he may be alergic or sensitive to other foods as well is because he still has dark circles under his eyes, even without consuming dairy. He is also allergic to penicillan, so I wonder about mold allergies & if that could cause the dark circles?

Welcome to all the new tribe members. It is good to have you with us.

max
post #35 of 178
Hey max,
My son had the dark circles too, and was very pale. He also had horrific diareaha (I can never spell that )- like he went poo about 7 times a day and it was runny- for months. Those symptoms virtually disappeared when we eliminated all his exposure to dust mites and took him off a bunch of supplements we had him on.

Just a side note: I was soooo convinced that his probs were a result of a food allergy that I was really resistant to the possibility of an inhalent. But, if food allergies can cause both gastro intestinal, skin, and respiratory reactions then it makes sense that inhalent allergens can also cause those responses as can contact allergens. I guess what I'm trying to say is not to totally dismiss other possible allergens as causing issues- it isn't always just a food allergy.
K
post #36 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by zipperump-a-zoomum
Hey atomicmama! I would love to know how you approached the school thing. Were the teachers receptive? DS is not in school yet, and I know the peanut thing is becoming more common so I am hoping that by the time he comes to school age where ever he goes will have seen it all before. But giving up that control kind of freaks me out, ya know?

Also, how do you deal with the peanut butter sandwiches in public thing? It buts the crap out of me when I see parents giving their kids pb sandwiches in places that are supposedly no-food places (our latest encounter with this was at the science center's water play area ). My son knows he's allergic and knows what to stay away from, but the thought that some kid has pb all over his hands and then runs to play with all this stuff my son is playing with scares me. I don't think he's that allergic, but you never know who there is. (and I fully expect and have no problem with it in typical eating places, but you're not even supposed to be eating there! )
Kaly




Hi!
My dd is only in Mother's day-out so far...(born after the cut off )
So, yes, the teachers and staff are great! She attends at our church.
However, next year when she starts kindergarten, I'm going to speak with everyone possible about keeping her safe!
One thing about her allergy that I'm very thankful for is, it's not as extreme as some! She does have a bad reaction if she ingests a nut product ( throat closing, vomiting, hives,etc.) And, if she touches her face to a contaminated area she only breaks out on her face.
There are some schools that are peanut/nut free! I wish they were all that way!
Best of luck to you and your kiddo!
post #37 of 178

Newbie

Hi everyone...I saw this thread and just had to chime in. Our 3 year old dd has anaphylactic food allergies to milk, peanuts and sesame. She is also highly allergic to eggs (maybe ana...we just don't go there.) Allergic to sunflower. We avoid all nuts, seafood, and seeds. She has environmental allergies, eczema since birth and asthma. We don't leave the house without an epi-pen. Our 6 month old dd is showing signs of milk allergy through my breastmilk...initially not and I added some back into my diet and he developed mild eczema (not nearly as bad as his sister was at that age...but I am back to avoiding it.)

I saw Melissa's post...that she had some issues with POFAK (parents of food allergic kids board on yahoo.) While they do not address issues with alternative or non-allopathic treatment of food allergies I have found them to be an EXCELLENT resource and very welcoming. There are many parents with kids with non-IGE mediated allergies there too. Lots of what to feed ideas, great research files and I found great support there as well. There are some strong personalities but it is a high volume list, so others shine through as well. It may not be for everyone, but it's worth checking out. Oh, yahoo also has a group called "FAAT" (food allergy alternative treatment) that discussed NAET/chiro and others as well. (I'm on both lists.)

We have gone the allopathic route and see a pediatric allergist. It is much harder to use alternative treatments with an anaphylactic food allergy as many of them involve eventual ingestion of some sort of the problem food...and I am unwilling to think about how awful that would be for us. RAST blood testing does involve taking blood which isn't fun...but it was helpful to us. Skin testing CAN be more gentle (unless you're testing lots of stuff at once.) However, skin testing is unreliable with the presence of skin rashes/eczema or kids with super sensitive skin (more false negatives or hard to read results.) Of course, if your allergies are not IGE based, they will not be picked up by either of these.

However, GI reactions can very well be IGE mediated, especially in the presence of eczema. Anaphylactic reactions are systemic and can include symptoms of any body organ. I know some people that have had success with IGG testing and others that haven't. YMMV...the research is a bit sketchy...but if it helps YOUR child then YAY!

And, though it can be troubling when I hear someone refer to milk intolerance as allergy...it is mostly because I don't want people thinking that MY child can be fed her allergens when it could very likely kill her. However, sensitivities and intolerances are not exactly a picnic (miserable sick child and terrible for the parents too...) and I know how people tend to blow off these intolerances, so I can totally understand a parent calling this an allergy. Afterall, the child can't and shouldn't eat the food (continuing to do so can really harm the digestive tract and that is no laughing matter.)

This was long! Anyway, I'll probably be a lurker but I'll try and post too. Since my experience has veered away from alternative therapies and into the mainstream, I'm also looking forward to hearing those experiences. I'll fess up and say I am an RN in an ICU but I am absolutely open to anything and will refrain from judgement without experience. (on the other hand I'm an aspiring homebirth midwife and my sister is studying naturpathy :LOL )

Chandra married to my sweetheart Mama :2tandem to Grayce "I can do it myself" (3 years ) and my plumpy love baby Owen(6 months) and our crazy Viszla : Marley... Aspiring midwife!! (Birth isn't pretty but it should be beautiful!!) Sometimes writer and confirmed liberal...
post #38 of 178
Chandra, thanks for the excellent post! I confess the POFAK folks hurt my feelings when they rejected my very first post -- I asked if anyone had experience with alternative medicine, and wasn't even allowed to post that -- they say it is "too controversial." It got my back up too -- I know that for me the lack of help I rec'd from the general medical community for ds's problems was what drove me to the alternative community in the first place!

Anyway, I am learning a lot here and am counting my blessings -- despite the hassle of his many food sensitivites and allergies nothing so far has been truly life-threatening and I am grateful for that. Why, oh why, are there so many kids with so many allergies these days?

This might be OT, but who is vaccinating their kids here? Ds had a bad reaction to his two-month round and we haven't done any since -- it makes sense to me that given the fact that his immune system is problematic it doesn't make sense to put more poison into it, esp. not when he was that young. I'm not convinced my way is right, but am curious as to how how other parents of allergic children deal with this issue.
post #39 of 178
Glad I found this thread! My DS has dairy, corn, and egg allergies. I've known for about 2 1/2 months (I suspected dairy allergy and took him to get the skin prick test where we found out about the other two). We quit cold turkey (well, he did. I still slip up every now and then but I'm doing better) and are doing well. The corn is by far the worst one.

PumpkinSeeds- your son sounds like mine! Same allergies, except my DS does fine with soy (I believe, I just use soy milk in baking sometimes and I've never noticed any reactions to it).

"ugh, they seem to be getting worse even though every one told me he'd outgrow them... "

Same here! Before we got the testing done I didn't suspect egg or corn because I hadn't noticed any obvious reactions to those foods, or foods with those in it. In fact, just 2 days before he tested positive to eggs he had scrambled eggs with no problem. Since he's been tested I've slipped 2 times. One was giving him a fingerful of spaghetti sauce, not thinking it would have corn syrup in it. It did and he reacted. Last week I gave him a little tylenol and now his butt is broke out and bleeding. I had NO CLUE tylenol had corn syrup in it. However, he has had tylenol, and other meds, before (many months ago) and not reacted, so this is a new thing and it seems to be getting worse
post #40 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by zipperump-a-zoomum
Those symptoms virtually disappeared when we eliminated all his exposure to dust mites
How did you do this?

Even without the "bad" foods and a good night's sleep, my dd still has dark circles under her eyes. But then so do I, so does my mom, my sis, etc. I don't know if it's genetic or if we all have (airborne) allergies that cause it. But then, *I* have allergies, my sister has allergies, my mom has allergies so . . . . . . . it's probably genetic AND allergies, :LOL We just did a deep cleaning on two bedrooms this weekend and I had to wear a shop mask. I forgot to wear it for a short time and ended up a sniveling, sneezing, drooling mess. And dh and the kids were fine

But my dd's only obvious symptom is the dark circles. Both of my kids have had fairly bad cradle cap though. I read somewhere once that could be a food issue but can't remember where I saw that. Has anyone else heard that? (and ds is such a mellow, easy going guy compared to his sister - the cradle cap that's still there at age 2 is the *only* possible symptom of anything).
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