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Why AREN'T you a vegan/vegetarian? - Page 4

Poll Results: Why AREN'T you a vegan/vegetarian?

 
  • 11% (32)
    I believe animals are here to serve us
  • 25% (71)
    I like the way animal products taste way too much to not eat them
  • 0% (1)
    I have never thought about the cruelties of factory farming
  • 7% (20)
    It's all I know. Eating meat was how I was raised. I never considered anything else
  • 51% (145)
    I believe it is the healthiest way for me to eat
  • 0% (1)
    I'm on a fad diet like atkins that condones eating meat
  • 1% (5)
    I think vegans are weirdos and don't want to grouped in with them
  • 3% (9)
    I have never heard a good argument against eating meat, but would change if I did
284 Total Votes  
post #61 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Primrose Burrows
There's no "I don't eat meat but I do eat fish" choice.

The idea of meat bothers me. I continue to eat fish because a. I'm not disciplined enough to get my protein elsewhere and b. I really like fish.


Kelly
I never had any meat, fish, poultry or any dead animals in my entire life (knowingly) but I suddenly started craving fish this pregnancy. I had some fish and chips and it really hit the spot. It was so weird. But I'm still pregnant and not craving it and am a bit revolted by the thought of eating it. Weird pregnancy. heh
post #62 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by kavamamakava
I never had any meat, fish, poultry or any dead animals in my entire life (knowingly) but I suddenly started craving fish this pregnancy. I had some fish and chips and it really hit the spot. It was so weird. But I'm still pregnant and not craving it and am a bit revolted by the thought of eating it. Weird pregnancy. heh
I took a midwifery intensive course a while ago with a wonderul teacher, who told us "If a pregnant vegetarian craves meat, she should eat it". Apparently it's the body's way of telling her she needs a certain compound available in meat.

Kelly
post #63 of 198
Funny, I have hated fish (except salmon) my whole life, and when I was pregnant I craved it all the time. Especially salmon, but all other fish too. I kept going out for fish & chips and thinking "this is disgusting" but I kept doing it. :LOL I did believe my body was trying to tell me something. Granted, I could've found it in a healthier form than greasy fried fish & chips... but it was just so goooood... in such a icky way... :LOL
post #64 of 198
A friend of mine told me that it was probably an iodine deficiency since I'm a recent transplant to the Pacific Northwest. Maybe that one week or so of fish solved the problem. I did start eating more seaweed for a while and that helped too.
post #65 of 198
I even went to Whole Foods and bought some grilled salmon. It had a nice flavor but I didn't really like the texture. The fish and chips did'nt have that chewiness. I think it was just fried to hell and back. LOL. I really enjoyed my big basket of greasiness smothered in malt vinegar but I really don't have a craving to do it again.
post #66 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by kavamamakava
I believe that beans and rice make a whole protein. Chapatis are like whole wheat tortillas - the package said that 1 chapati has 4 grams of protein. I also garnish my meal with plain yogurt but didn't mention it since it's really just a garnish. I do use about 1/2 cup throughout the meal though. I had no idea that corn was a protein source. My brown rice says it has 8 grams of protein per serving.
Actually, dieticians have now discounted the idea that you have to combine foods to get a "whole protein" in a single sitting. Tha's outdated advice.

So long as you are eating in a generally healthy way, you will get your complete proteins/amino acids over the course of several meals/days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by polihaupt
Besides, I have tried eating vegan foods from the local co-op, and I just can't stand the taste or the smell of it
Which vegan foods were those? Fruits or vegetables or grains or beans or legumes or....?
post #67 of 198
I should not be here, but I just have to say, I LOVE that someone brought up what I like to call "The screaming asparagus" argument...that plants and animals are the same somehow & it is OK to eat both. Total nonsense when you consider anything from pain response to the presence of the CNS.

Basically, you can justify that it's OK to eat anything, if you want. However, we have developed opposable thumbs over our years as humans, and I like to think of more creative things to do with them than cause pain so that I can have a hamburger. My goal is to walk gently through this beautiful life and take only what's necessary, create beauty, and avoid causing unecessary pain. I feel so much better than I ever did when I ate the flesh of dead animals. in you mamas
post #68 of 198
If pain is the issue, does that mean that it would be ok with you for an animal to be killed if it could be done painlessly?
post #69 of 198
There's no choice for me. Myself and my family, except for my husband, were vegetarians for about 7 years. My kids are old enough now that I let them choose what they wanted to eat, and I started to lose weight because I was eating way too many carbs and plain old junk because I don't like veggies, or tofu, or most of the veggie meat replacers. I also thought that being a vegetarian might have been what was making me sick.
post #70 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sustainer
If pain is the issue, does that mean that it would be ok with you for an animal to be killed if it could be done painlessly?
Can you really imagine a way of farming, hunting, or killing animals so that they experience no stress, suffering, or pain, and are not denied the ability to express their inherent behaviors, or satisfy their innate psychological, social, or physical needs? If so, I'd be interested in hearing about it.

To me, this sort of question ranks up there with ones like, "What if plants feel pain?" and "If everyone stopped eating animals, wouldn't those poor cows go extinct?" They seem more like diversions than serious questions. (Not saying, sustainer, that you weren't asking in seriousness--but to me, I don't really see a point in spending a lot of time musing on such matters, since they address such unlikely scenarios)

I did read an article on how, in the future, scientists believe they might be able to create cloned meats (not cloned animals). beats me how'd they'd actually do this. Doesn't sound appetizing. I'll stick with my beans and nuts
post #71 of 198
It is a purely theoretical question, asked in an attempt to get to the bottom of a way of thinking.
post #72 of 198
Quote:
I took a midwifery intensive course a while ago with a wonderul teacher, who told us "If a pregnant vegetarian craves meat, she should eat it". Apparently it's the body's way of telling her she needs a certain compound available in meat.
Just a funny thing this brought to mind. I had "pica" during my pregnancy - the desire to eat inedible things such as chalk, dirt, etc. Apparently that is also because my body was craving something. I had the urge to eat dirt the whole pregnancy, and the smell of a dirty raw potato was heaven to me. However, I didn't eat dirt (I could often be seen gazing lovingly over potatoes though LOL!) But, it does make me wonder if we should really go with our cravings or perhaps just analyze our diets more?
post #73 of 198
And Mountain, I just love "the screaming asparagus" - that is one I haven't heard and I think I just peed myself.




Laughing, that is.




Not just some kinda freak accident due to the need for Kegels. Although, that has happened.
post #74 of 198
The question still stands: Theoretically, if killing animals were painless, would that make it okay? I'm curious.
post #75 of 198
Animals die during farming. There are thousands of rodents, birds, insects, etc. that die during the tilling of the earth. Blood is spilled and pain is suffered whether you eat plants or animals. We as human beings developed as omnivores. Undoubtedly, modern humans eat more meat and less vegetables than we should but that does not negate the fact that we are biologically set up to eat both plants and animals. I believe in eating as healthy as possible in the most humane manner - organic and free range. There are certain meats I avoid such as veal because of the inherent cruelty in their production. I believe that you can tread lightly on this earth and eat meat.
post #76 of 198
I voted "I believe it is the healthiest way for me to eat" because my family (DH, DD and I) all ran into some major health problems on an extremely strict (no packaged or junk foods, no caffeine, chocolate, or alcohol/drugs, everything made from scratch including tempeh and tofu) whole foods vegan diet. Now we are conscious omnivores who raise our own poultry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by my~hearts~light
I have recently started following some of the biblical instruction for eating meat. I know very little about this as a whole and am looking for a good book on it. We only eat beef, chicken, turkey and deer right now. No pork at all.
Have you tried reading "The Maker's Diet" by Jordan Rubin? I've heard that one is good and biblically based.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EFmom
I can understand how one could be vegetarian, but not how one could be vegan. I have a niece who is. I dearly love this girl and I dearly hate having her come stay in my house because of her diet. I would never want to be in that position myself.
For people who are extremely ethically motivated, any animal enslavement is akin to murder. That is why we were vegan, because you cannot have milk or eggs without being dependent on killing a bull calf for meat or culling the unwanted chickens, either the males at birth or the old tired layers. Also, some people can argue that it is more humane to kill a wild animal for meat instead of forcing an animal to live in crowded and unhappy environment, milking or taking eggs away from that animal, and then after it is done finally killing it.

Another reason for being vegan is for people allergic to both milk and eggs, who don't want to eat meat.

I did not find it very hard to cook vegan (however going out to eat was a completely different story), but unfortunately it did not work for my family.
post #77 of 198
Quote:
The question still stands: Theoretically, if killing animals were painless, would that make it okay? I'm curious.
This is the deal with animals and pain and such. Oh, but first, the answer is no. But if I was living in the wild and could find no berries etc, I would kill an animal to survive regardless of what tools I had therefore how painful it may be. It is the nature of beasts - the greatest beast of all being man.

However, I have been attached to a cow, they are beautiful creatures with a loving heart and deep, soulful eyes. I have been friends with a lamb, until it reached adulthood, and they are funny people, and like to snuggle your neck. Just like our pets, the dog and the cat, we learn they are amazing creatures, with their own spirit and personality, and killing a cat or a dog after knowing this becomes an inner struggle. I love all creatures, and knowing there is such wastage of their bodies burns at my chest. We throw away so much, and the markets just keep churning them out - we have no respect for the lives we have taken. We don't see the flesh on our plate as something's mother or a thinking being.

When we eat meat in our home, we don't give thanks to God, we give thanks to the animal that was sacrificed so that we may eat in luxury. I didn't have to battle for hours to catch, kill and skin the animal - it just magically appears at the store. So this is how I am teaching my child thankfulness, and one day we will witness a real kill, so she knows the fullness of reality and appreciates what flesh is.

So, no, if it were painless (there are ways to kill painlessly), it wouldn't change anything for me as I appreciate all souls and all personalities of these amazing creatures. We are almost vegetarian and once my bone marrow problems are sorted, I will ditch meat completely. In fact, this thread has inspired me to just deal with the problems I face with iron supplements and ditch meat now.

Eat meat if you like, just be grateful - for all the things you don't have to do to have it, and all the things you prevented that animal from experiencing in life so you could have it.
post #78 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Primrose Burrows
There's no "I don't eat meat but I do eat fish" choice.

Kelly
That's because the poll is about why you aren't a vegetarian. You answered the question in your reply but us veg*ns define it as not eating animals and fish are animals, too. We make no ethical distinction between the two. Hence no separation in the poll.

-PM
post #79 of 198
When animals die and rot, roots of plants suck up the nutrients.
Veggies don't care where they get their sustenance from.
Veggies 'eat' dead animals.

So veggies are not vegetarian.

They are eaters of everything.
Omnivores, even.

If you eat a vegetable which grew by feeding off the nutrients of dead animals, (insects, birds, mice, etc., etc.), aren't you practicing indirect meat-eating?

(found on Usenet)
post #80 of 198
Oh Deadheadgranny, that is enlightening, a la Buddha! Love it!


We Are One, We Are A Part Of Everything, And Everything Is Us.

Nice work.
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