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What are the easiest/hardest states to homeschool in? - Page 2

post #21 of 54
Oklahoma is another very easy state to HS in.

You can view all of the HS'ing laws at http://www.hslda.org


Quote:
One thing I have wondered- public school kids have to have 180 days a year, but kids have sick days. I have to have 180 days a year- are my kids allowed to have sick days?
Heck yes! Plus, how many times teachers show movies during school time?!?! There have been days where I needed to get things done so I had my girls play (puzzles, coloring, etc) and called it an "Educational Play Day".
post #22 of 54
Idaho is very easy.
post #23 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamarhu
Last year I moved, also had the luxury of choosing exactly where. I chose rural GA, partly because of the homeschooling laws. What I hadn't taken into account was that all the local homeschooling groups would be strongly fundamentalist Christian. I am quite alone in my unschooling, socially it is tough for the kids and me both. Much is good about what we're doing here, but I fear I made a major mistake in some ways. My advice would be to research laws, narrow it down based on whatever other criteria are important to you, and then spend some time (maybe a month?) in each area if at all possible before committing yourself. I regret that I didn't have the opportunity to do that - my choise would definately have been different. Isn't it exciting to have all the world to choose from! Best of luck on your journey.
This is EXACTLY my fear!! We are considering a move from MN to TX (Dallas/Ft. Worth). MN is a very liberal state, pretty easy for homeschoolers (letter of intent, optional testing). I know TX is really easy, easier, in fact but I'm terrified that everyone will be a fundamentalist Christian and we won't fit in :

Jenny
post #24 of 54
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the leads so far, and also for the website and book recommendation.
I also have this fear that I will move and then the laws will change on me.
Now I want to compare how the homebirthing communities compare with the homeschooling laws.
I just wanna do what I want with my family without having to worry about the state interfering, is that to much to ask?
post #25 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv my 2 sweeties
I assume mojomom removed her dd from a school she had been attending, because if you homeschool from the start, you don't even have to do that in Michigan! A lot like Texas I guess -- no need to state intention, report, test, take attendance ( ) or anything. Gotta love it!

Yes I did take her out this year in 2nd grade. So that was THE only complication and it was still no big deal
post #26 of 54
I'm in CA and personally think it's easy and non-intrusive. We're planning a move to AZ soon and even filing an intent form once kinda rubs me the wrong way--like now I'm in some database of hs'ers or something. Not that I want to avoid the system--not an issue for me. We hs in CA through a public charter ISP. Legally, it's as though we are public school students, which feels "safe" to me (as opposed to hs'ing "underground" or filing an R-4).
post #27 of 54
Indiana is very easy.
post #28 of 54
I'm in Oklahoma, my kids have attended school here and been withdrawn and I'd say it the easiest state we've been to (between Alabama, Florida, Maryland).

Even the administration said there was nothing to it...just withdraw them and be on your way. So that what we did! Gotta love that!
post #29 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie
One thing I have wondered- public school kids have to have 180 days a year, but kids have sick days. I have to have 180 days a year- are my kids allowed to have sick days?
Annette
Don't know about PA but in GA home schooler's do not get any sick days. They must have 180 days of school.
post #30 of 54
I'm spoiled because this is our first yr homeschooling and we live in Colorado. I only had to sign a form letting the SD know we were homeschooling. They say they want at least 4 hours of instruction a day for 172 days, but I don't have to report this to anyone.
We're going to be moving to PA and I'm not looking forward to all the work involved.
~Kelli
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PublicSchooltoHomeSchool/
post #31 of 54
The law is always more intimidating than it needs to be. Before you move to a new state or consider a new state, get in touch with the homeschoolers in that state. Yahoo groups as well as Finding your Tribe have been great resources for me.
post #32 of 54

A little on PA

forgive me if this is repeated info - i am in a hurry but wanted to share in case it is not repeat stuff:
PA law has a requirement of immunization records (not verbatim - check into the specifics for yourself if you consider HSing here) so that is one thing to consider, if you are a non-vaxing family. as someone else did note you don't have to go on record until the child is 8, so that gives time to address the issue, if it is one for you. the amish don't vax, (and PA has a HUGE amish population), so i am sure there is some way around this. we have been referred to a book entitled: your personal guide to immunization exemptions, by grace girdwain. our chiropractor recommended it as he did not vax and his kids went to regular schools. and he is not an MD, so he didn't write some sort of medical waiver either. he says the book provides state by state info on exemptions. we'll see!
several teacher friends (who do actually support what we are doing with the unschooling concept) say that the teacher's union is very strong in PA and that they have worked hard to make HSing difficult in the union's best interest. that to me says that the rules are unlikely to change in favor of HSers and may even become more unfavorable. just a personal opinion/feeling though.
good luck and thanks for posting because, believe it or not, we are in the SAME boat - moving before long and wanting to find a state that has laws we can live with.

Kate
post #33 of 54

one more thing...CT

we have sort of a dual-residency thing (long complicated story- don't ask!) with CT and PA and I forgot to mention CT. CT is very easy and almost funny. if you WANT to, you can file a notice of intent, but you aren't required to. if you DO submit a notice then you do a review with a school board official for about 15 minutes in their office at the end of the year. but you do not have portfolio review if you do not file the notice of intent. there is no testing, no records (if you aren't submitting to review) and the subject matter "criteria" is easy. the general statutes only get specific when it gets to history, as it says "to include a study of town government and history" or something cute like that. other than that, subjects are the things your kids learn anyway - mathmatics, grammar, science, etc. - all vague subject areas like that. CT HSers have groups (as i am sure other states do also) for activities and socialization. the CT HSers site is:
www.cthomeschoolnetwork.org

Kate
post #34 of 54
Quote:
PA law has a requirement of immunization records (not verbatim - check into the specifics for yourself if you consider HSing here) so that is one thing to consider, if you are a non-vaxing family.
Well, you are allowed to have an exemption and go to public school, so I would assume you would just present your exemption when you declared you were homeschooling.

Quote:
several teacher friends (who do actually support what we are doing with the unschooling concept) say that the teacher's union is very strong in PA and that they have worked hard to make HSing difficult in the union's best interest.
PA does have a very strong public school union, and they are talking about dropping the compulsory education age down to six which will probably just effect the homeschoolers.

Annette
post #35 of 54
I'm in PA, and it's a real pain in the neck here, but certainly doable. There's definately an exemption for vaxing, but you still have to have annual physicals. Last I heard, there were some lawsuits pending; some families were saying that the laws are too restrictive. They are, but if you do the absolute minimum, it's okay. I have no idea how people manage to unschool in PA, but apparently some do.
post #36 of 54
Do you think a Naturopath could do the physicals? We are lucky since Michael is just in kindergarten, and most of the hs-ers we know here are pretty much "schooling at home".

Quote:
I have no idea how people manage to unschool in PA, but apparently some do.
I think they lie (really!)

I'm trying to keep track of things so I am in the habit of it when we do actually have to report. I have a friend who does the absolute bare minimum- for attendance, she checks a calendar, her portfolios have the minimum required, etc.

Annette
post #37 of 54
Well, NM was very easy. Had to file a letter of intent and that was it. I didnt, and no one ever caught me
WA is easy. It looks difficult on paper, but it isnt. ABout the vax requirements, they have that here too, BUT you keep the vax info on file at your home, in case you put your child in ps. Also, there is a form you can print up from the dept of health in Washington. You check off that you are opposed to vax for personal reasons, and then you list the vax that your child hasnt received. If there is an outbreak your child will stay home from school (!!) and that is it. It is not a state where if you philosophically dont vax, you cant do any shots. You can pick and choose
post #38 of 54

Maryland

This is our first year but Maryland seems reasonable. You file a form of intent to homeschool and have 1-3 (no one i've met has had 3) reviews, the first in person around Jan, the second you mail in work samples in May or June. Testing is optional. You can join an umbrella group for as little as $60 and then you can do peer reviews and never have to meet with anyone from the county. What i'm curious about is the states that let Homeschoolers take some classes in the public schools. I sure wish we had THAT here!

I know the reporting is a pain, but remember that it protects children whose parents may keep them home and not teach them anything. And i'm not talking about unschoolers, i'm talking about neglect.

Good luck!!!
post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by mother
I know the reporting is a pain, but remember that it protects children whose parents may keep them home and not teach them anything. And i'm not talking about unschoolers, i'm talking about neglect.
Well, we can debate this but I disagree. Neglect does not happen any more often in states where homeschoolers have complete freedom. If reporting and testing really worked this way then every child in the school system should graduate well educated and literate and that just doesn't happen.

I'm in NJ where we don't have to test or report to anyone so I know I'm spoiled :LOL
post #40 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shellie
I'm in CA and personally think it's easy and non-intrusive. We're planning a move to AZ soon and even filing an intent form once kinda rubs me the wrong way--like now I'm in some database of hs'ers or something.
We just moved away from Tucson AZ last summer and it is a wonderful place to homeschool. The intent is no big deal, it is just states that you are responsible for educating your own children and then you and your DH sign it. It is a one time thing. Tucson has 8 homeschooling groups so it is easy to find one to find one you like AND the groups all get together occassionaly for things like spelling bees, science fairs, etc. Once a year they have a "Homeschooling 101" night as a way to provide homeschooling information to any one in the community who is interested. The county superendentant of schools would come to answer legal questions, clarify that special needs kids could still get services through the schools, talk about how great homeschooled kids do on tests, etc. VERY supportive. ( no testing is required)

Also, HSed kids can talk a class at school or play on teams at school if they wish. The homeschooling community was very diverse -- from dresses only Christians to pagan to jews to catholics.

How easy or hard it is to homeschool some place goes way beyond the laws. We are now in Kansas and the laws are easy (we register as a private school, which really meant that we had to come up with a name), but homeschooling here is icky for us right now because we haven't found our nitch.
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