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Does anyone else not mind if their young child watches TV? - Page 4

post #61 of 103
We watch TV here too. I am sure that if I were seeing problems with it, ie- the glazed look and fits some are describing, I would think of throwing it out too.

My kids watch some PBS, used to watch Nick Jr and Playhouse Disney when we had cable. Basically, my kids watch a bit here and there, not excessively unless someone is sick (like today my dd has a stomach bug :Puke ).

They always prefer to play with arts and crafts or go outside, or read a story, so I have never had a problem turning off the TV.

I can certainly see why some families decide that they need to go TV-free, but I have seen no reason to do so with my family, we're doing just fine .
post #62 of 103
Quote:
A note about marketing, though, as it seems that people are very quick to assure everyone that their kids watch commercial-free shows. Those shows are one big commercial. Clifford has a whole line of toys that go with the show. As does every show on Disney, and almost every show on Noggin and Nick Jr. See the show, buy the stuff.
nak

maybe we are strange, but we don't own any commercial merchandise. ds shows no interest in the products associated with the few shows he watches. the only character stuff we own is thomas the train, and we got most of that before i even knew it was a video series. oh, i forgot, he does have an elmo toothbrush.

But the reason commercial free is important to me is not that we won't be able to resist the marketing lure, but that I find the commercials to by hyper and annoying. They have an energy that I don't want my kids exposed to as long as I can help it. If the tv is ever on for one of our shows (a baseball game or something like that), the commercials are always muted. It's pretty funny to watch dh or I dive for the remote if a commercial comes on and we had walked away for a moment.

and it might just be me, but i can't stand the stuff on noggin/nick jr/disney. ds only watches a few shows on pbs. all the other ones annoy the crap out of me. dh particularly hates dora for some reason and actually requested that i not let ds watch it. okie dokie.,
post #63 of 103
Quote:
What really gets to people is that we have never prevented the kids from viewing love scenes or nudity at all. I guess it just comes down to what is important to each fam.
That's how my parents were. Love scenes and nudity were not an issue for them. Scary or violent things were a big problem for them. I remember not being allowed to watch Jaws or Mommie Dearest. And I can't tell you how many movie theaters my mom made us walk out of.
post #64 of 103
My dd watches some PBS, some NickNoggin, and rarely the mainstream TV unless her older step-siblings are watching. But she loves books, and at 25 months, has the language skills of a three-year old. I think it depends on the child how much is acceptable. We watch 1hr a day tops, sometimes none.
post #65 of 103
My dd doesn't watch TV shows, but she does watch dvd's.

I *love* the Singing Times dvd's. Often I watch along with her and do the signs and talk to her about what is happening on the screen. She is 13 months and knows most of the signs on the first dvd. It has done wonders for our communication, and she has developed such confidence in her ability to "tell" me what she wants and what she sees.

We also watch the two BE dvd's about animals, and the Wiggles.

Aine is super high energy and the Wiggles calm her down (but do not make her a zombie).

The funny thing is that aside from her dvd's, we almost never have the TV on. We don't have cable. Not because we are anti-TV, but because my dh and I simply aren't very into TV.

I do miss the Daily Show, though. And yet when we had cable, I'd never remember to watch it! I find the TV very forgetable.
post #66 of 103
Mine like to watch TV. We love The Wiggles.
But last week, I imposed a new rule: No television until Daddy comes home. Any exceptions would be made only by ME. (Like if I have to make a phone call to the insurance company and NEED to be without distractions.) Since making this rule, I have only made ONE exception. (yesterday!)

One drawback is that the better shows for them are on during the morning.

My husband has agreed to one tv-free night each week! (well, after the 5 o'clock news.)
post #67 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa
Our family really enjoys TV and we set no limits on it. I think it's a great thing, just like books and music.
I love your reply! Our family too.

TV adds a lot of value to our lives.

Books though are a problem Every time a book comes into the house, it seems to multiply into several.

I do enjoy TV but most of my time is spent reading. I'd rather read than do anything else.
post #68 of 103
We have no limits on TV watching in our house, really...i mean no arbitrary limits. we have limits in that we prefer doing other things, so the TV is not on or we're out of the house, but I don't see the point of counting the minutes that he's exposed to TV. He never watches adult content, he only watches Noggin or PBS.

As for the commercials...come on...you really think that watching TV is the ONLY way that commercialism leaks in?? you think your child WON'T want the latest craze? and what's the big deal if they do? I dunno, that seems extreme to me. My son is very verbal and can name characters from every TV show he watches and can identify their toys in stores, and can identify them as we walk away from them in the store. if you have the will power to shut off TV completely, you have the will power to not buy them the toys that go along with the shows that you don't let them watch. LOL i have the will power for both, but the desire for neither.

i'm probably REEEEALLY unpopular right about now. LOL
post #69 of 103
I guess it depends on your family's values. Our family is not one for keeping up with the Joneses or environmentally irresponsible overconsumption. This is a core value in our home and we use every opportunity to explain to our children how irresponsible purchasing and consumption are depleting the Earth's resources. The commercialism in television give us one more opportunity to discuss this with our kids.

I agree that if you want to protect your children from commercialism, turning off the television is only part of the answer. You also have the responsibility to take your children to stores that do not sell junk. We are lucky that there is a shop in town that carries educational and wooden toys and the like and when we go shopping, we go there or we look online. We boycott stores like Wal-mart for political reasons so our kids are not exposed to the mountains of cheap plastic junk they sell there, either.
post #70 of 103
my worry about TV is that it teaches kids what "kids" supposed to be like. I figured out young that my family was weird (they are) and so quickly and completely adopted TV models of adults/kids/teenagers. I acted what I saw on TV 100% and it took me until I was out of highschool to let go of that training. It took at least 10 years away from me since for ten years I was not percieving the world on my own terms but on the terms of TV sitcoms and cartoons and afterschool specials and movies. This "normality" I want to avoid. I want my kids to experience life, not act out reactions to life gleamed from their TV models.

Yes, kids are presented these models in books too - but because the visual images are created in the kids' own head, the models are less completely "other," the models from books MUST contain elements of that child's family and world.
post #71 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawanabe
Yes, kids are presented these models in books too - but because the visual images are created in the kids' own head, the models are less completely "other," the models from books MUST contain elements of that child's family and world.
Yup. Books promote a creative imagination - even picture books. The child adds to the story in his mind images that are relevant to himself.

TV leaves no room for imagination - it's all placed in front of you. You don't have to conjure up an image of the protagonist or even put yourself in the lead character's position; you just watch the actors or characters play it out for you.

The Plug-In Drug discusses this with regard to the recent "Harry Potter" craze: it lauds the book series for inspiring a generation to read, and praises the quality of writing in the books.
Quote:
That a population of video-weaned children were able to fall for the charms of this marvelous, marvel-filled series of books has been one of the most hopeful omens of the television era. It is an indication that skills and abilities like inner-visualizing and following a narrative have not disappeared; they have just gone underground.(p.103)
But then it discusses the reverse affect of the HP movies:
Quote:
For most of the Harry Potter fans who flocked to see the movie, it was a fine recreation of their reading experience. But from now on great numbers of children will see the movies before reading the books. For them, things will be different. Having seen the film, a boy who then chooses to read the book will never be able to transform the main character into himself as he reads - a deeply satisfying part of the reading experience. Thereafter he will visualize only the movie's version of the bespectacled boy wizard.(p.103)
post #72 of 103
Thread Starter 
I thought everyone who watches the HP movies has read the books first? The books come out well before the movies; who wants to wait that long? :LOL I finished the last book in 4 days and now I have to wait, what, another year?!
post #73 of 103
same for me, but... even though I read the books first (and enjoyed imagining all of the characters, etc.) once I saw the movie, my imaginations were displaced by what I saw onscreen.

As much as I loved how true-to-the-book the movies were, I lamented losing my own first impressions (from reading the books) after watching the movies.
post #74 of 103
Cannot wait for more Harry Potter! I do not care for the books, but I enjoyed the movies. My kids however really liked the books as well as the movies, and they really enjoy discussing/debating about the differences between them.
post #75 of 103
mamawanabe - you make a really, really great point about learning how families are *supposed* to be. i hadn't thought of it like that before. i do think that some shows can help to model positive behaviors and give "words" or "reactions" to things that are more appropriate than knee-jerk reactions...ways of handling situations, etc that they might not see in real life...but I agree that there is a danger that they will rely too much on TV models for how they react/feel/think/behave. thanks for that point.
post #76 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by michelemiller
As for the commercials...come on...you really think that watching TV is the ONLY way that commercialism leaks in?? you think your child WON'T want the latest craze? and what's the big deal if they do? I dunno, that seems extreme to me.

No, I don't think that tv is the only way for them to be exposed to commercialism, and marketing. I just want to be more aware of it. It is much easier to limit and control the amount and kind of marketing elsewhere. The bulk of the marketing towards children, though is through tv. It's insidious and very penetrating. Just look at the connection between Disney and McDonald's.

And, yes, I do control what I buy for her. What kind of question is that? :

Honestly, why is everyone so threatened by my turning my tv off?!


Bec
post #77 of 103
Thread Starter 
I worry about the ads when she gets older. When I was 7 and didn't have a TV at home, I would sometimes watch TV at the neighbors' when I stayed with them after school, and I remember this gum commercial I saw. The slogan was that it would "really move you" or something like that, and it showed people surfing. I thought that if I chewed that gum, waves would instantly appear beneath me. OK, so maybe I was a little, uh, dumb...but that's the effect advertising can have!

We try to mute the ads when dd is around.
post #78 of 103
oh, i'm not at all threatened by the fact that you don't watch TV or allow your kids to watch TV. i am quite secure with my decisions and my choices for our family. What bugs me (not about YOU, but about the argument against TV) is that TV is blamed for more things that is warranted. TV as a babysitter, violence on TV, adult-themed TV shows, yes...PBS? Noggin? the same argument does not hold true. There are other arguments, yes...but they are not on the same level, imo, and not "dangerous" unless left unchecked by irresponsible parenting strategies (not saying anyone here is irresponsible)

i think it's great that you and others have chosen to not watch TV. more power to you. I also think it's great that I haven't. LOL
post #79 of 103

Another me too

Quote:
Originally Posted by michelemiller
i think it's great that you and others have chosen to not watch TV. more power to you. I also think it's great that I haven't. LOL

Yeah me too Michelle.

I'm fine with anyone not watching TV. We just do things differently in our family. I don't see anything wrong either way.

I actually have read the arguments against TV but reading them hasn't changed my mind

Mary Beth
post #80 of 103
It just bothers me that so many of the arguments against TV are pseudo-scientific, yet pretend to be hard science. As a social scientist myself, I am very bothered by irresponsible "statistics" and catchy phrases that misrepresent the realities of the studies, populations, limitations, etc. "TV Causes ADHD!" "TV Made My Child A Murderer!" sheesh.

Edited to add: i mean arguments in the media, not arguments on here.
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