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Book Challenge 2005: January - Page 2

post #21 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astrid
Am I supposed to write what it's about now or when Im done :
Write about it when you are done.

#1: "How I paid for college: A novel of sex, theft, friendship and musical theater" by Marc Acito.

Well the name alone intrigued me so I picked it up from the library. If you like David Sedaris and Augusten Burroughs, you will like this book. It is a fiction story of a teenage boy trying to earn money to go to Julliard when his father refuses to pay. (Dad wants him to study something practical like business). However, don't be fooled - this is not a kids book - just like Running with Scissors there are some sexual stuff here - both homo and hetrosexual - but not serious stuff - funny, irreverant, laught out loud outrageous, etc. stuff. Very fun book - even more fun if you are into musicals like I am.
post #22 of 222
#1 Pride & Prejudice - Jane Austen

Elizabeth Bennet is the perfect Austen heroine: intelligent, generous, sensible, incapable of jealousy or any other major sin. That makes her sound like an insufferable goody-goody, but the truth is she's a completely hip character, who if provoked is not above skewering her antagonist with a piece of her exceptionally sharp -- but always polite -- 18th century wit. The point is, you spend the whole book absolutely fixated on the critical question: will Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy hook up?

I so love this book everytime I read it. I am off to start Emma and even have a "Jane Austen" Mystery that I grabbed from the library.
post #23 of 222
I am so excited to find this thread! I was just reading the Book Challenge 2004 thread and got many, many ideas from it.

I will set my goal at 52 books for this year. I think thats about all I can handle!

#1 - Beloved by Toni Morrison

In the troubled years following the Civil War, the spirit of a murdered child haunts the Ohio home of a former slave. This angry, destructive ghost breaks mirrors, leaves its fingerprints in cake icing, and generally makes life difficult for Sethe and her family; nevertheless, the woman finds the haunting oddly comforting for the spirit is that of her own dead baby, never named, thought of only as Beloved...
post #24 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe
I'm not setting a goal because I already read before doing just about anything else but I am very interested to find out how many books I do read so I'm going to keep count this year.

.

Me, too. Now I'm all excited. I better go to the library tomorrow.
post #25 of 222
Thread Starter 
# 85 for me!

I just finished a great book called Man and Wife by Tony Parsons. I really liked it and was mad when I realized it is a sequel, now I will have to read the first one second! It was an I can't put it down read about second marriage. Here is the amazon synopsis
Harry Silver is ready to try again at living "happily ever after." It won't be easy: not when he has to juggle his wife, his ex-wife, his son, his stepdaughter, his work, and his new wife's fast-growing career. Did Harry commit to marriage to Cyd too soon after his split with Gina? Can you love -- really love -- a child who is not your own? Can you be a good father to a child you only see on the weekends? When Harry meets a woman who makes him question all these things and more, his tangled web becomes even more knotty.

A brilliant sequel to the international bestseller Man and Boy, Tony Parsons' Man and Wife is a story about families -- and love -- in the new century, written with his trademark humor, passion, and superb storytelling that have made millions across the globe laugh and cry
post #26 of 222

#2 for LB

"Vaccines - Are They Really Safe and Effective?" by Neil Z. Miller

Well, I think the title gives a pretty good synopsis in itself! This is one of several books on the subject that I just got in from Amazon. I liked how he explains the both the dangers of the disease and the vax for that disease. There are some parts of the book where I wanted a little more detail (it's a quick read) but he provides plenty of references that I can follow up on, if I ever get around to it.
post #27 of 222
#1 The Blue Bottle Club by Penelope Stokes

This is a novel about four women now in their eighties who made a vow to pursue their dreams when they were teenagers and put them into a blue glass bottle. Most of it takes place in the 1920s and 30s. A reporter finds the bottle in a historic house that's going to be demolished and goes around the country finding the four women and hearing their stories. Not terribly intellectual but it was a good read.
post #28 of 222
Hmmmm, ok, I'm in....do books we are currently reading count if we finish them after 2005 begins? For example, I am in the beginning of rereading Lord of the Rings (I last read it in 5th grade) so will this count? (I actually have a few books in process both non-fiction and fiction so I guess this question applies to them all.

As far as my goal...hmmm, I read a lot, but I will start out with 100 with a goal to go higher.....)

One thought about this thread becoming unmanageable with the number of books being read and ppl participating is that we could create a Yahoo Group or a board at a place like ezBoards where we could each create our own databases and then just post our new ones, that way we can all go back and see what the others have read without having to sift through a zillion messages. Just a thought....anyway.....
post #29 of 222
Well, I am counting Daughter of God as #1, as I read more than 1/2 of it after New Year's Eve. It was a very interesting read, makes you want to look up a lot of bits to find out if it is fact or fiction like The DaVinci Code. Very Goddess oriented.

from Amazon:
"The Nazi plunder of Europe's art and antiquities during WWII sets the stage for a thriller spun around a religious coverup so devastating it could topple the Vatican and crush Western religion. A dying, repentant Nazi, Willi Max, calls renowned American art broker/historian Zoe Ridgeway, to Switzerland, where he reveals his cache of looted treasure, hiring her to catalogue and return it to the owners or heirs. Shortly after she tells her husband, Seth--an ex-L.A. cop turned comparative religion professor at UCLA--about the exciting job, she is kidnapped from their Zurich hotel room. The dismissive Swiss police do little to search for Zoe, so Seth takes charge when he reads that Willi Max died when a fire demolished his mansion just hours after Zoe met with him. Seth discovers that the destroyed treasures are only a fraction of the spoils stashed in a booby-trapped salt mine since WWII. One religious relic's very existence was kept secret by the Vatican for centuries: it's a burial shroud clearly showing the image of a young girl, a second messiah. This "daughter of God" was killed, along with her entire village, in the time of Constantine, because her sex and her healing powers threatened the fledgling Christian religion. When the Nazis found out about the shroud, Hitler used the relic to blackmail Pope Pius into silence about Nazi atrocities. Seth has sole access to the salt mine and soon the head of Vatican intelligence, the Russian mafiya and other sinister agents give murderous chase. Perdue's speedy tale of greed and power boasts strong heroes and villains with credible motivation. He steps nimbly between Switzerland and L.A., putting Zoe in peril, but with the wits to save herself. A valiant cadre of aging war survivors add color to the cast."

I've started reading A Midwife's Tale and Book 5 of the Gaurdians of Ga'Hoole: The Shattering (a young adult book.)

#1: Daughter of God
post #30 of 222
#2 Singing Bird by Roisin McAuley.

Mother of adopted girl decides to try to find birth parents of her daughter. Mother too is adopted and waited too long to find her parents and doesn't want same thing to happen to her daughter. Takes place mostly in Ireland. A so-so book - interesting twist of ending but writing not that great.
post #31 of 222
Thank you for starting a new thread about this for 2005! I waded through the old thread once or twice, but it was pretty overwhelming. I'm glad to get in on this one early.

So far this year I have read:
Founding Mothers by Cokie Roberts (started after xmas 2004). Very readable. Focuses on "women worthies" so that we might come to know Eliza Pinkney, Mercy Otis Warren, et al. the way we "know" G. Washington, T. Jefferson, and B. Franklin. Glosses over some vital social history which I think weakens the scholarship of the book, but probably makes it more palatable.

The Rule of Four by Ian Caldwell and ???. A literary who-dun-it being compared favorably to The DaVinci Code. I agree, but then I'm not a big DaV. C. fan.

Happy reading all. P.S. I'm taking notes, so thanks for the all the info!
post #32 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommytoMJM
One thought about this thread becoming unmanageable with the number of books being read and ppl participating is that we could create a Yahoo Group or a board at a place like ezBoards where we could each create our own databases and then just post our new ones, that way we can all go back and see what the others have read without having to sift through a zillion messages. Just a thought....anyway.....
You're right this thread may get pretty overwhelming. I really like having it all here and being able to get recommendations as they are read. Perhaps, we could do a new thread each month to keep the size down . . .
post #33 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe
You're right this thread may get pretty overwhelming. I really like having it all here and being able to get recommendations as they are read. Perhaps, we could do a new thread each month to keep the size down . . .
I like the new-thread-each-month idea. So, that would make this the January 2005 Book Challenge Thread, which will be followed by the February 2005 BC thread, etc. etc. And none of us have to get too terribly hung up on when we start and finish the various books -- we just put them in the current thread (in other words, if I start a book today and don't finish it until March I put it in the March thread).
post #34 of 222
I posted these on the old thread when I picked them up, but I finished the first one New Year's Day and just finished the second one today (so posting here for any "newbies" to the thread) Both highly recommended.


"The Memory of Running" by Ron McLarty
'Smithy Ide is a really nice guy. But he's also an overweight, friendless, womanless, hard-drinking, 43-year-old self-professed loser with a breast fetish and a dead-end job, given to stammering "I just don't know" in life's confusing moments. When Smithy's entire family dies, he embarks on a transcontinental bicycle trip to recover his sister's body and rediscover what it means to live. Along the way, he flashes back to his past and the hardships of his beloved sister's schizophrenia, while his dejection encourages strangers to share their life stories. The road redeems the innocent Smithy: he loses weight; rescues a child from a blizzard; rebuffs the advances of a nubile, "apple-breasted" co-cyclist after seeing a vision of his dead sister; and nurtures a telephone romance with a paraplegic family friend as he processes his rocky past. McLarty, a playwright and television actor, propels the plot with glib mayhem—including three tragic car accidents in 31 pages and a death by lightning bolt—and a lot of bighearted and warm but faintly mournful humor. It's a funny, poignant, slightly gawky debut that aims, like its protagonist, to please—and usually does.'

and

"At Grandmother's Table : women write about food, life, and the enduring bond between grandmothers and granddaughters"
'More than 50 women share their grandmother's touching life stories and favorite family recipes, and comment on how food forms the common bond that connects these women across the generations'
post #35 of 222
Thread Starter 
Sounds like a plan. I will change the title of this thread and then start a new one each month, if I forget please some remind me! I agree that if we don't do that this thread will be unmanagable, this way ppl can also look at each month for recomendations.

Just try to keep track on your own if you want to make the total for the year.
post #36 of 222
#1 The Handmaid's Tale by Margarat Atwood.

Fascinating, disturbing... I couldn't put it down and I can't stop thinking about it!!

It is set in the near future, the US has become Gilead, where women are not allowed to work, read, watch tv, have friends. It is a story told by Offred, a handmaid whose sole purpose under the new social order is to breed. She is "given" to a Wife who cannot have a child and is expected to conceive her a baby or else die. Through the book, she is remembering the time before the changes, when she lived with her husband and child, often wondering what became of them.

I don't want to write more because I don't want to give away the story :LOL
post #37 of 222
I would like to join in, too. I'm setting a very achievable (I think! -- given that dc #2 is on the way in June) goal of 52 books. I guess this means books we actually finish, right? I just started "Reading Lolita in Tehran" and just couldn't get into it -- it went back to the library.

Right now I'm reading "Miserly Moms" -- some good ideas for budgeting, but the author uses a letter from a reader that uses the term "FemiNazis" (as in, "I used to be a FemiNazi") !!! Kind of turned me off the whole thing. :
post #38 of 222
#2- Maggie's Miracle by Karen Kingsbury

This is the second book in the Red Gloves series. I read the first one Gideon's Gift right before Christmas. Not to be cheesy, but they're so touching. In the one I just read, both a little boy named Jordan and his mom Megan need a miracle. Jordan writes a letter to God and it goes from there. A short book.
post #39 of 222
OK, I am in! I will set my goal at 104 books for 2005! I think 2 a week is a realistic goal.
Thanks for posting this, I am off to READ!!!!
post #40 of 222
Thread Starter 
Welcome to all and happy reading!
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