or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Parenting the Gifted Child › Support for Parents of Gifted Children, #3
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Support for Parents of Gifted Children, #3 - Page 2

post #21 of 366
Funny little interaction betw. me and ds (4).

DS: Mom, she [baby sis] is going to knock over that bucket of crayons.
Me: Don't worry about it.
DS: Mom, quick, grab it! (as the bucket falls and spills crayons everywhere)
DS: Ughhh (in exasperation). That's just what I was hoping to avoid.

Sometimes, I love how he uses his words and expressions!
post #22 of 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
Recently, I've heard many people ask if their child might be autistic, and they always say something like "He seems mostly normal but he does x and I read somewhere that kids with Asperger's Syndrom are like that." .........

I'd go so far as to say that everyone I've ever met has something which could be siezed upon as justification for a diagnosis of Asperger's (or anything else, really). I used to play a game-- write down everything you do for a week, and give me the list along with two hours and a DSM, and I'll find something to diagnose you with.

Wow, that sounds a little bit ranty. I don't mean to come across that way, but this is something that's been really getting on my nerves of late. It seems like everywhere I go, someone's thinking their kid is autistic because they heard that kids with Asperger's seem mostly normal. They do-- but they also seem very different. Most of the people I've heard this from need to put down the abnormal psychology books and read "Raising Your Spirited Child" or something along those lines.
Oh gosh, I hear you...I've had it suggested more than once that ds might be "on the spectrum" because he read before he talked (which was late) and wasn't really interested in interacting a whole lot with other kids his age.

I KNOW he's not autistic, but when everyone keeps suggesting it it gets to you after a while. Strange, since we started HSing and he gets to hang out with kids with similar intellectual profiles, he seems a lot more interested in interacting! I wonder why?
post #23 of 366
i'm seriously debating the merits of teaching beanbean how to read in a few months. on one hand, i know he could handle it; on the other, i don't want to push him too hard. there's more, but the point is, i'm really of two minds at this point.

i don't know why i'm so worried about this now.. maybe because i was his age when i read my first book? hmm. i just need to relax, i guess.

but it leads me to another question-- where do you draw the line between encouragement and pushing? for the past 15 years, i've wished that my mother had encouraged me to do just about anything; she never did, though, for fear of "pushing us too hard." so I never had anything to work for. school work was so easy that it may as well have been handed to me already finished and on a silver platter, and i didn't do much outside of school until junior high. even then, there were no challenges in my academic life.

BeanBean is two now, and I'm starting to feel that he should be encouraged to do something. I suppose the fact that I don't know what means that he's not ready, but I'm not sure. Sometimes he does seem ready. I don't want to fight with him, though. I want it to be fun, I want him to enjoy working things out and using his brain.

I suppose I should wonder what he wants out of life. At two, he doesn't want much; to watch the garbage trucks in the morning, to play with his cousins and grandparents, and to color and trace lines on his maps. He plays letter games and shape games and color games. I think he could probably do a lot more... maybe he's too young to be worrying like this. Is it possible for a two year old to stagnate?
post #24 of 366
My son also doesn't fit in with other children because he is so bright. They often don't have a clue what he is talking about. Like yesterday at playgroup he was asking a child about their painting and he said, "Did you intend to blend the colours that way? The contrast nicely?" To which the 3 year old responded, "Painting is fun." Elijah kind of got a look on his face like, "Oh brother," and walked away. I was also given a weird look at the craft table when he informed me that he was making a craft for his friend Andrew and asked if Andrew would be impressed with his work. Didn't seem like a particularly advanced comment to me but they were surprised at his use of the word impressed and also his grasp of the concept of other people being impressed with his efforts. I worry about him because of this. I was the same way and I just did not enjoy being around other children. It was almost like I felt they were too simple to waste my time on.

My daughter is sick right now with a really bad cold so she's not doing much other than being miserable. Oh but of course she still has to assert her independence even in the middle of night and even when she is sick. She kept waking up wanting to nurse or wanting water. The one time I had to go to the bathroom quickly and I knew she would want to nurse so I asked DH to get her some water and I'd be right there. I was in the bathroom and heard a big ruckus and I went in and Olivia was standing in the middle of the floor stomping her feet and yelling, "You do not have to hold me, I can drink my water myself, just leave me alone!" Then I came in and she ran over to me crying and said, "Daddy won't leave me alone!" DH was a bit offended but it was actually pretty funny. He was just trying to cuddle her because he felt bad she is so sick and she did NOT want to be coddled. Of course once I was there she dove in bed as sweet as a newborn lamb and said calmly, "I want to nursie."

Have to run she wants to nursie again.
post #25 of 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
but it leads me to another question-- where do you draw the line between encouragement and pushing? for the past 15 years, i've wished that my mother had encouraged me to do just about anything; she never did, though, for fear of "pushing us too hard." so I never had anything to work for. school work was so easy that it may as well have been handed to me already finished and on a silver platter, and i didn't do much outside of school until junior high. even then, there were no challenges in my academic life.
With my parents, and my ILs, there was never really any direct "Pushing" just the open assumption that all grades would be good and they were very actively involved in our school life. It was just expected of me that I would make all A's and I did. It was just expected that I would play an instrument in Band (I'd heard my talk about how fun band was and my mom talked about how beautiful music was), so I did. And it was absolutely expected that I would go to a four-year-residential college, so I did. My teachers were also great - they recruited me to be on academic teams, to get involved in clubs and stuff, and then to apply for scholarships for colleges. My parents were at every single PTA meeting, school play, science fair, band performance (in fact, they were band chaperones for most away events),academic competition, awards ceremony. They never paid us for grades, becuase it was just expected that we would get good one and we didn't need to be bribed, but we would all go out to eat in celebration when we got our report cards every six weeks, and they made a point of telling us they were really pround of us. The one class I ever made a "C" in during high school, I was so devastated and they were just completely supportive and made me feel so much better, because they knew I'd worked really hard (I have a total block on foreign languages and never got above a B in French). You know, thinking about it now, it probably helped a lot that my parents had both been high school teachers in the past.

I don't how much - if any - these things apply to the homeschooling environment. I never did any preschool, my mom stayed home with us when we were little and we didn't do any formal learning before attending school. Just lots and lots of trips to the library, children's museum, nature centers, parks, and other cool places. I actually started Kindergarten at age four and did well academically.

edited to add - I didn't really make it clear in the post, but I loved all of my experiences! I had a great time in school, loved band, colorguard, science team, debate team, church youth group, governor's school, and I'm glad I went to college, even though it was at times very difficult due to some issues I had with perfectionism and an eating disorder. I just wanted to clarify that my parents didn't encourage me to do things I didn't enjoy!
post #26 of 366

Early Intervention came today....

Well, the speech evaluator came today for Sam's stuttering and all went really well. He's only considered a mild stutterer and she was reassuring that it is most likely due to his verbal precocity. He enjoyed the testing at first (she was using stickers as a reward) but he got tired of it after about a half an hour (plus he was anxious to play with a tiger flashlight she had used to see inside his mouth earlier). Anyway, he topped off at about midway throught the 5 year old level, but that was due mostly to the fact that he was tired of answering questions. Some of the stuff I knew he knew but he would just point to something without looking or give a silly answer and giggle. The tester was great and she could tell this and that he was done. I was surprised by some of his answers because I initially thought they were wrong, then he explained them and it turned out he was right. In one question there were 3 pictures, one of a bycycle that had fallen over, one of a chair with some books open on it and one of a coloring book with some crayons. The evaluator asked "Sally scraped her knees and elbows, how did she do this?". Sam looked at all the pictures and pointed to the chair and books. I thought he didn't understand, then he said "I guess that chair is much to high for jumping off of.". It makes sense since he doesn't ride a bike and we don't know any big kids who do, so he wouldn't know you could hurt yourself on a bike. Anyway, since he's only considered mild he won't qualify for services but she encouraged me to continue on with the rest of the evaluation (they also have a phychologist and a teacher come see him) because she said it will come in handy when he's school age in regards to gifted programs. Honestly, however, having this evaluation and having some confirmation that he's well advanced is only causing me to lean more towards homeschooling. That's all, just wanted to share with you guys!

J
post #27 of 366
Thread Starter 
Rynna, I'm sure what you're doing with BeanBean is fine. If he seems happy and eager to learn then I don't think you need to encourage him on top of what you're already doing.

I understand what you mean, though. We unschool and sometimes I feel like I'm not doing enough with the kids. So if they seem grouchy I'll ask them if they want to do some [structured] learning. Sometimes it's what they need and other times it's not.
post #28 of 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
i'm seriously debating the merits of teaching beanbean how to read in a few months. on one hand, i know he could handle it; on the other, i don't want to push him too hard. there's more, but the point is, i'm really of two minds at this point.
We chose not to teach DD1 after talking with our (very good) local librarian. She said that in her experience, children start to process language differently after they learn to read and are often less likely/able/willing to soak up the spoken word. She isn't one of those folks who have a blanket objection to all early reading, just the direct teaching of very young children in the earliest stages. DD1 taught herself to read at least two months before she turned three; we don't know how many because she didn't come out of the closet until we reassured her that we would always read to her, no matter what.

We had a couple sets of Bob Books, but DD1 was already reading past that level by the time we got around to using them. Besides, she's a sight reader, even of the Bob books. Now that she's reading, we're working our way through the Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading. Strange as it may seem given this choice, I'm not teaching her phonics. We just look at the words and read the passages. One lesson takes about five minutes.

I believe that reading aloud is more important at this age -- even after they can read on their own -- because read-aloud vocabulary is richer and the child will be exposed to more complex sentence structures and stories. Hopefully, they also get the right pronunciation; I've read that gifted readers are more likely than others to mispronouce words because they often read words before they hear them. I've lost count of how many novels we've finished in the past few months. The scary thing is, she has a far better recall of detail than I. I can only push the "mommy-brain" excuse so far, even with the new baby. We used to read each chapter twice (mommy or daddy would have to "catch up"), but that's proven unnecessary.

Quote:
but it leads me to another question-- where do you draw the line between encouragement and pushing?
This is tough. For now, we've chosen exposure and options without any expectation that she do this or that. Instead of encouraging her to try things, we encourage her to keep at it if it gets frustrating. Or take a break an come back later. We also try to model healthy failure whenever possible.

Quote:
school work was so easy that it may as well have been handed to me already finished and on a silver platter, and i didn't do much outside of school until junior high. even then, there were no challenges in my academic life.
I had a similar experience, except that I had a brief shining moment (in the one undergraduate program I did finish -- all others were apparently in anticipation of homeschooling) for which I applied myself and kicked some serious butt. However, I'm thinking that homeschooling will help the girls avoid this. There will be no status quo to live down to, KWIM? No grades. No external validation that becomes the raison d'etre of schooling. I want the girls to grow up feeling good about themselves and their abilities. Sorry, getting off track here.

Quote:
Is it possible for a two year old to stagnate?
Sure it is, but only if there is no opportunity to do anything else. I don't even think giftedness would be much of a factor. IMHO, any child in an enriched environment, with interested parents and plenty of interesting things to stumble across (even just a cool back yard) will not stagnate. If you haven't seen it, I'd highly recommend "Bringing Out the Best" by Saunders and Espeland. It's OOP, but if not in your library doesn't it can still be found remaindered and cheap used copies are available. It's chock full of ideas on how to enrich the environment of young gifted kids without pushing
post #29 of 366
My mom and I are both trained teachers of reading, and we are teaching ds to read now...but he is FOUR, not two. While he generally needs a little bit of a push to do anything at all, he has been "ready" to read, in terms of knowing the letters and sounds, for a very long time, and recently, he began saying things like, "I wish I could read it myself" because I am often busy with the baby. So we have started teaching him with a systematic phonics approach which may seem artificial or boring to some, but which he loves. (I say "we" because my mom is my full-time child care provider and she has been doing some of this work with him during the weekdays.) We are teachng him short vowel words in isolation right now (hand, bust, cat, send...) and as well, he has learned the "sh" blend and the "oo" as in Boo! (from a shirt I wore this Halloween, actually). So he can't read books yet, but he can read lots and lots of words, and he loves it! He sees himself as a reader now, which is really exciting to him. My goal is to keep it fun and not to push if he resists.
post #30 of 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
i'm seriously debating the merits of teaching beanbean how to read in a few months. on one hand, i know he could handle it; on the other, i don't want to push him too hard. there's more, but the point is, i'm really of two minds at this point.

i don't know why i'm so worried about this now.. maybe because i was his age when i read my first book? hmm. i just need to relax, i guess.

but it leads me to another question-- where do you draw the line between encouragement and pushing? for the past 15 years, i've wished that my mother had encouraged me to do just about anything; she never did, though, for fear of "pushing us too hard." so I never had anything to work for. school work was so easy that it may as well have been handed to me already finished and on a silver platter, and i didn't do much outside of school until junior high. even then, there were no challenges in my academic life.

BeanBean is two now, and I'm starting to feel that he should be encouraged to do something. I suppose the fact that I don't know what means that he's not ready, but I'm not sure. Sometimes he does seem ready. I don't want to fight with him, though. I want it to be fun, I want him to enjoy working things out and using his brain.

I suppose I should wonder what he wants out of life. At two, he doesn't want much; to watch the garbage trucks in the morning, to play with his cousins and grandparents, and to color and trace lines on his maps. He plays letter games and shape games and color games. I think he could probably do a lot more... maybe he's too young to be worrying like this. Is it possible for a two year old to stagnate?
Why don't you just try, in a casual kind of way? If he's interested, he'll go for it; if he's not, you can leave it. My ds at 2.5 knew probably 200 sight words but when I casually introduced the idea of each letter having a sound he didn't want to "play", so I just dropped it. 4 months later dh got him "Pooh's Ready to Read" software and apparently he was ready, because he played with it obsessively for 4 days straight (while I was flat on my back with the worst flu I've ever had), by the end of which he had them all down. 6 weeks later he was decoding and reading his books on his own. I guess his brain was just suddenly primed for it at that point. You'll know if BB is ready or not by his reaction.
post #31 of 366
I get such pleasure myself from reading I get excited about kids who learn to read early...like they can experience that joy earlier...never thought there might be a downside to that....

Someone said to me the other day "she's so little for her age" and I said "really, she's the same size as the other little girl and she's a month older"(it was at playgroup and there were other toddlers there, she was playing with a 19 mo old) The lady said "isn't she 2" and I said "she just turned 18 mos" ....her eyes got real big"she seems so much older, I thought she was a tiny 2 year old, she talks so well!"

I get that a lot...and it makes me wonder...will people expect more of her because of this...on the other hand shouldn't we expect more of her in some way?

About teaching reading to BeanBean...I think introduce it gently...if he's ready he will read, if not he won't...I know what you mean about doing more...that's it isn't it? You really can't stop him once he gets it in his head he's ready...LOL...at the rate he is going the choice may be taken out of your hands...he may just decide on his own he wants to learn

Sometimes I feel like I have been given this overwhelming responsibility and I am so scared of messing it up...Sophia will come to me and say "BBC's" when she wants to type letters on the computer and I think about it before I do it...should I, should I not, she's a baby...why am I doing the alphabet...I never offer, she always asks so she is taking the lead...but then there's that little doubt about "am I pushing her" which I don't think I am because that would require work and basically I am a lazy person...LOL

Anyway, cute thing here. Something I have noticed lately is that she is really into "sharing"(at this point I think it' kind of a game rather than really getting it) and I think empathy is developing too...it's like she kinda gets it though...but I have never made her share, she's too young for that concept. but I always give babies toys when they look at hers so I guess she understands that others want toys too.

So at playgroup Friday she went and gave her doll she was playing with to a one year old to play with then gave him a kiss on the cheek(it was real sweet)he had been crying because it was all new and he was shy and she went and gave him her doll, gave him a kiss and got herself another doll...he started playing with the doll and stopped crying...his mom was amazed...I was very proud.

It's a lot of fun with this child...I think I will take her to more playgroups each week..we could go every day...she loves other children...
post #32 of 366
(this was posted elsewhere, but it was suggested that
I come here.)
Hi All this is my first time in this forum and I would like your opinion, if I may!
Little history- have a 2 yr old girl, Sara 1-19-03, and a 3 mo old girl, Sydney 10-09-04.
We are homeschooling. Actually, more like unschooling. Even though Sara is 2 (Jan 19th!!!) my husband and I began her education since birth it seems and go at a very laid back pace.
Sara is extremely receptive. It may seem hard to believe, but she knows her alphabet, can count to twenty, has very good pronounciation and grammar, can read (somewhat from memorization) and has begun to write.
Her abilities astound us. She enjoys learning about the solar system and can tell you all the planets in order. When we ask her where she lives, she says Earth. But her favorite is Saturn because it has pretty rings!
Just too cute actually.
Do we have the makings of a brainiac here? All my sisters (who are anti-homeschooling by the way) say I am not smart enough for my daughter to school her. Meaning she's smart, not that I am stupid.
This kind of concerns me. If she is such a sponge, and so smart, will I have a problem? Am I just overreacting?
I swear I am not here to brag...okay, I am here to brag- she is so flippin smart!!! Its kinda scary actually...
I just don't want to put any hinderance on her brainpower, kwim?
Any suggestions in helping her thrive in her education?
Thanks for your responses.

Warm Regards
post #33 of 366
You're totally right-- I don't feel like I"m doing enough with him. Of course, I don't feel like I'm doing enough of *anything* of late. *sigh* I really worry about him, especially at times like this when I'm feeling so miserable overall (depressed, stomach virus, general ickiness). I feel like my miseries may be making his life more difficult already. I was feeling horrible, and then it occurred to me that I might be turning into my mother and I just burst into tears. I really hope it's not the case, though, and that I can work this crap all out of my system. At any rate, someone made an excellent point: this may well be taken out of my hands in a few months anyway. BeanBean is not terribly visually oriented, but he seems well on his way to reading anyhow. He's got a bunch of books memorized (he has for ages) but when he's actually "reading" he totally makes up words. Sometimes he'll "read" a blank sheet of paper and tell me it says "a b c's, won't you sing with me?" and then sing.

Miss BooBah started cruising a few evenings ago. Crawled out of bed and pulled herself up on a drawer (the first time she's pulled up to standing on something non-human) and then cruised to the end of it. She stood there, rifling through Mike's shirts for a while before she got back on the floor to eat one of BeanBean's toys. :LOL Mike saw her first, he called me "Honey, come see, hurry up!" because he thought she was going to fall, but she stayed up for a good long while.

Which brings me to a question: have you ever seen very tiny socks/footed sleepers with tread? I had this problem with BeanBean when he was 14 months old; he would walk and then fall down and I couldn't figure out why until I changed him and realized that the pajamas he was wearing had no tread on the bottom. It was a 12 month size blanket sleeper, and it fit him beautifully, but it wasn't meant for a walking baby (a newborn XL, as opposed to an infant small). It was very easy to fix at that point; infant sizes (12-36 months) do have tread on the bottoms of the feet, so I just made it a point not to put him in the newborn sized sleepers anymore. I've never seen *anything* in a 6-9 month size with tread on the feet, and it's too cold for BooBah to be barefooted. I don't want her to slide too much when she stands, though, because if she's holding on to something she could hurt herself really badly. She only started cruising this week, but tonight she was doing it one-handed and I think she may attempt to walk soon. : At any rate, if you see teeny tiny (she's about a size 2) socks with tread on the bottom, please let me know where! She doesn't need to fall to hurt her head-- she's got a brother to do that for her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by amyjeans
She enjoys learning about the solar system and can tell you all the planets in order. When we ask her where she lives, she says Earth. But her favorite is Saturn because it has pretty rings!
BeanBean likes Saturn because there's a car called Saturn. When he found out there was a car called "Mercury" he just about flipped his lid. :LOL

I'm not sure what to say about your sisters. My sisters always thought I was wierd for saying I wanted to homeschool, but now one of them's got me teaching her daughter so . The other one is really obnoxious and acts like she knows more about parenting and homeschooling than I possibly could (and she *really* doesn't, she's totally out of her league on both counts) so she's nasty about it, but it doesn't matter. My niece is thriving. Of course, it's never been suggested that I wasn't smarter than my kids... but that's a whole different can of worms.

My mother found a small article in her local paper mentioning a support group, irl, for parents of gifted children! They're doing an 8 week seminar on a book called "Guiding the Gifted Child" and I am so totally going (it's only $30, and they give you a copy of the book). The group is something like the Lancaster Coalition for the Support of Gifted Children. Mom said "I've never heard of these people, but where the hell were they when I needed them?" :LOL I really can't wait to go. I'm totally expecting to encounter some people I've met before (as far as gifted children in my old school district go, I was somewhat... infamous) but not since becoming a parent, and some people I've never met before. Hopefully there will be other parents of very young children, and homeschoolers...I've just got really high hopes.
post #34 of 366
I found babygap has small socks with tread.
http://secure.www.gap.com/asp/Produc...01&wpid=281116
hope this helps.

As far as my sisters go, well, just to let you know, I am the baby, so it is completely within my right, as well as my duty to turn 180 degrees from their methods.
I was the first in my family (of 5 mind you) to breastfeed, to have unmedicated, unmanaged, unassisted homebirth, and of course the first to CD, stay home, and homeschool. Needless to say, they've all got a bug up their "you know what" about my "lifestyle". I think it's not jealousy but more a regret for not making a choice, but doing what everyone else did.
Its actually funny, how mainstream these people are. Almonst "Keeping up with the Jones'" type!
I always thought I was more of a follower, seems I am a leader as well.
I just hope that our "thinking outside the box" rubs off on our children.
post #35 of 366
It is so nice to have found this thread..DS is 12 years old and reading these posts brought back many of the things he did when he was much younger( carrying only matching toys, the lining up of the toys, theability to do puzzles very young..the verbatim memorization.) what a nice trip down memory lane..he is in 7th grade, in all honors clases and bored with school, but teaches himself new things every day. he sat down last night and researced the yellow fever epidemic of 1793 because he heard about the spread of malaria in the tsunami ravaged areas. he is a joy to watch interact with his world...I love the way he is always reading, looking, analzying things, then 2 seconds later , he is off riding bikes with his buds..
post #36 of 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by amyjeans
Do we have the makings of a brainiac here? All my sisters (who are anti-homeschooling by the way) say I am not smart enough for my daughter to school her. Meaning she's smart, not that I am stupid.
This kind of concerns me. If she is such a sponge, and so smart, will I have a problem? Am I just overreacting?
Warm Regards
If she's that smart I would think HSing is the only way to go! And don't worry, your job is not to know everything she needs to know. Your job is to facilitate her learning, and sounds like you're doing fine at that already.
post #37 of 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by catgirl
If she's that smart I would think HSing is the only way to go! And don't worry, your job is not to know everything she needs to know. Your job is to facilitate her learning, and sounds like you're doing fine at that already.
Also, you might find the faciltator role easier than anticipated. In my son's case, he taught himself much of the basics: shapes, numbers, etc. I taught him uppercase letters, back when he was speech-delayed because I wanted to see if he could make the sounds necessary for speech. But he taught himself the lowercase counterparts when he got letter magnets for his second birthday. We had no idea how he figured out that "g" was, "G". I've been reading through Miquon math stuff, reading how to teach children to add and subtract. Imagine my surprise when I discovered that ds1 does add and subtract single-digits. I have no idea how he learned that.

We have found that he is very self-directed. You may notice that about your daughter. I've often heard parents of gifted children say that their children pull them (as opposed to pushing the children). Whether or not mine is gifted, I can vouch for the incredible self-motivation and the rage to master things. You might find your daughter running ahead, with you following behind trying to keep her up in resources. As scary as that initially sounds, I think that it's ultimately easier in the end. From what I've read, gifted kids often teach themselves.
post #38 of 366
Rynna, are you able to find Robees "shoes" for little ones anywhere? My 9.5 month dd started standing, and slipping, around 7 months old. We got her Robeez leather booties to put over her socks; they have suede bottoms and do not slide on our wood floors. She is a tiny girl, and the 6-12 month size was a little big for the first month or so but did not impede her ability to start cruising and definitely helped to keep her on her feet. They are a little on the expensive side (almost $30) but we have 2 pairs, and she wears one or the other every day. The also help to keep the socks on because they have elastic at the ankle.
post #39 of 366
i have looked at robeez, but they are way too expensive; i've also heard that they don't always fit babies with exceptionally wide feet/high insteps, and she's got both. at this point, she's still too small for preschoolians, which are also too expensive. somoene on another thread suggested using puffy paints to make tread on the bottoms of things, and i thought that was brilliant.

I've got pictures of cruising BooBah in my sig! Just click on "BooBah" to see my little lady crawling and trying to walk!
post #40 of 366
Rhynna---awwwww BooBah is getting big! Dylan isn't close to reading (I know she is almost 3 months younger than BeanBean) she can recognize many words by site and spell aloud and on a keyboard, but I don't think I will be teaching her to read for close to another year. But, B seems really receptive to it.

amyjeans- I can't get over how much Sara sounds like DYlan. She loves the solar system too! And she isonly one day younger than your little girl! Wow!

Does anyone's gifted child seem to actually have a short attention span? Or is it just me? She won't focus on anything, it is bounce from one thing to another. She doesn't finish anything. She is just a ball of wired energy! Sometime si can't keep up! I am so glad she has started napping again!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Parenting the Gifted Child
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Parenting the Gifted Child › Support for Parents of Gifted Children, #3